Tag Archives: Tarion

Tarion Warranty Corp.

Tarion issues plan for new warranty program

Latest News


Tarion issues plan for new warranty program

Tarion Warranty Corp. has released its Implementation Plan to address the recommendations received from Auditor General of Ontario. Tarion is also seeking public input on 10 consumer protection initiatives to improve service delivery and help build a more transparent, fair and accountable new home warranty and protection program.

Tarion Warranty Corp.

“We are looking for input from the public and consumers as we modernize our processes, improve our services and conduct our business in a more responsive and transparent way,” says Peter Balasubramanian, president and CEO of Tarion. “We are confident the changes we have made, and are currently implementing, will create a stronger new home warranty and protection program for all Ontarians.”

Since the release of the Auditor General’s report, Tarion has been implementing improvements such as:

  • Strengthened corporate governance by protecting the New Home Ombudsperson’s independence, reducing executive compensation, and revising corporate by-laws.
  • Improved customer service by ensuring service targets are met, developing clear customer standards and enhancing quality assurance measures.
  • Enhanced consumer protection by eliminating the backlog of investigations into illegal building and homeowner complaints, establishing a new process to complete investigations in a timely manner, and increased Ontario Building Code training of staff.
  • Increased homeowner access to timely and cost-effective ways to appeal Tarion decisions including piloting an independent, third-party mediation program.
  • Created greater transparency by publicly reporting on outstanding issues raised by the New Home Ombudsperson, and adding past convictions and information about exceptions to displaying the dollars in claims paid to the Ontario Builder Directory.
  • Stronger oversight of builders by ensuring past performance is considered, requiring better evidence of financial means to complete projects, and investigating all reasons leading to the cancellation of projects.

Of the 25 recommendations directed to Tarion in the report, 11 have been completed, with eight more to be completed by the end of this year. Tarion says it has committed to complete the remaining six items in 2021.

tarion.com


SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_may20_industry_report_fi

New-home building and renovation industry acts to protect workers, customers

Latest News


New-home building and renovation industry acts to protect workers, customers

In times like these, people’s health and well-being are of the utmost importance. This extends to workers in Ontario’s new-home building and renovation industry and to our industry’s customers. For many residents of the GTA, this is a period of heightened anxiety and concern, so I want to take the opportunity to let readers know how our industry is striving to be part of the solution.

I have been in regular contact with our members to understand what actions they are taking and to co-ordinate responses with provincial and municipal authorities. Without fail, BILD members are taking action to help meet community needs and respond to the health crisis, guided by the best information available, that is, information from the public health authorities in the municipalities and regions where they operate.

Individual company actions may vary based on their own unique situations. Companies are enabling social distancing through remote work where possible. Many are opening sales centres by appointment only, or closing them entirely for now. They are taking steps to ensure increased hygiene, sanitation and cleaning for locations that remain operational.

We all know that the current situation is not normal and that as we all work to address and overcome this global pandemic, there will be impacts. Global supply chains, movement of goods and productivity are all affected. Our industry is working diligently to ensure that we continue to fulfill our responsibilities to our customers. We also recognize that eventually the effects of the current situation will extend to the delivery of new homes and completion of renovations, as well as any warranty work that might be required under builder warranties and Ontario’s New Home Warranties program.

In this regard, Tarion, Ontario’s body for consumer protection and administration of the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act and regulations, has recently issued an advisory for home builders and new-home buyers on what to expect during the COVID-19 situation. This material can be accessed at tarion.com. It provides solid guidance, but should not replace direct dialogue with your builder.

The GTA’s new-home building industry, professional renovators and land developers are doing their best to continue to meet the housing needs of residents, while at the same time doing their part to reduce the spread of COVID-19. At times like these, we must all pull together by working collaboratively and taking care of each other. That is our industry’s commitment to our colleagues, our customers and each other.

Dave Wilkes is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

bild.ca

SHARE  

Featured Products


BILD report April 20 issue

New-home building and renovation industry acts to protect workers, customers

Latest News


New-home building and renovation industry acts to protect workers, customers

In times like these, people’s health and well-being are of the utmost importance. This extends to workers in Ontario’s new-home building and renovation industry and to our industry’s customers. For many residents of the GTA, this is a period of heightened anxiety and concern, so I want to take the opportunity to let readers know how our industry is striving to be part of the solution.

BILD report April 20 issue

I have been in regular contact with our members to understand what actions they are taking and to co-ordinate responses with provincial and municipal authorities. Without fail, BILD members are taking action to help meet community needs and respond to the health crisis, guided by the best information available, that is, information from the public health authorities in the municipali- ties and regions where they operate.

Individual company actions may vary based on their own unique situations. Companies are enabling work where possible. Many are opening sales centres by appointment only, or closing them entirely for now. They are taking steps to ensure increased hygiene, sanitation and cleaning for locations that remain operational.

Working diligently

We all know that the current situation is not normal and that as we all work to address and overcome this global pandemic, there will be impacts. Global supply chains, movement of goods and productivity are all affected. Our industry is working diligently to ensure that we continue to fulfil our responsibilities to our customers. We also recognize that eventually the effects of the current situation will extend to the delivery of new homes and completion of renovations, as well as any warranty work that might be required under builder warranties and Ontario’s New Home Warranties program.

In this regard, Tarion, Ontario’s body for consumer protection and administration of the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act and regulations, has recently issued an advisory for home builders and new-home buyers on what to expect during the COVID-19 situation. This material can be accessed at tarion.com. It provides solid guidance, but should not replace direct dialogue with your builder.

The GTA’s new-home building industry, professional renovators and land developers are doing their best to continue to meet the housing needs of residents, while at the same time doing their part to reduce the spread of COVID-19. At times like these, we must all pull together by working collaboratively and taking care of each other. That is our industry’s commitment to our colleagues, our customers and each other.

h_mar20_industry_report_1

Dave Wilkes is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

bild.ca

RELATED READING

At the crest of the busy renovation season, here is a guide to planning a successful one

 

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_nov19_consumer_prot_fi

What you need to know about Radon – even in new homes

Latest News


What you need to know about Radon – even in new homes

You can’t see it, smell it or taste it, but radon – a naturally occurring radioactive gas – may be present in your home. Radon can be found virtually everywhere. It is created by the breakdown of uranium found in rock and soil, and when it escapes from the ground and mixes with the air, it is diluted to very low levels. The problem occurs when radon seeps into a home, often through cracks in basement floors and foundations, and gets trapped in enclosed spaces such as basements or crawlspaces.

Since November is National Radon Action Month, let’s share discuss some important facts about radon. Let’s start with the fact that almost every house in Canada has some radon. Concentration levels can vary widely from area to area, and even among different homes in the same neighbourhood. Radon is not the result of a defect in the way a home is constructed, and there is no way to determine if radon is going to be a problem before a home is built.

With proper ventilation, however, radon will dissipate, causing no problems at all. Unfortunately, enclosed spaces without good airflow can develop dangerously high radon levels. Long term exposure to excessive radon can increase the risk of lung cancer.

Similar to carbon monoxide, radon can be detected and measured. Radon is measured in units called becquerels, and Health Canada has set 200 becquerels per cubic metre as the safe limit for radon in a home. The only way to determine levels of radon is to test the levels using either a do-it-yourself radon test kit or by hiring a radon measurement or mitigation professional.

It’s important to note that radon levels can change from year to year, and even throughout the year due to a number of factors. This is something that should be taken into consideration when determining when and how often radon testing should be conducted. For example, seasonal changes can cause radon concentration levels to vary within your home. Health Canada recommends testing for radon between October and April, and using the three-month test. With the changing temperature levels, the weather and air pressure can produce different readings during certain periods.

Major renovations that affect your ventilation or the soil beneath your home can also create new opportunities and routes for radon to enter your home, so if you are planning any structural modifications, such as turning your basement into a living space, it is important to test for radon before beginning renovations. You should also have your home retested after the renovations are complete to determine whether the levels have changed.

If you’re an owner of a new home and you have excessive levels of radon, the good news is that your statutory warranty includes coverage for a full seven years. In fact, Ontario is the only Canadian jurisdiction that covers radon remediation under the new home warranty. To be eligible for coverage, radon levels must be tested over a three month period and whether you use a radon professional or a do-it-yourself test kit, both must be certified through the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program. Test results showing levels in excess of 200 becquerels should be submitted to Tarion along with the applicable warranty form.

To learn more about radon and your warranty coverage, visit tarion.com or watch our video on YouTube. If you are looking for do-it-yourself radon test kits or for a radon measurement or mitigation professional, contact the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program at c-nrpp.ca. If you have questions about how to make a warranty claim, you can contact us at 1.877.9TARION or email customerservice@tarion.com.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corp. tarion.com Facebook.com/TarionWarrantyCorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


Downtown Toronto

When you can live in, but not own, your new condo

Latest News


When you can live in, but not own, your new condo

What you should know about interim occupancy fees, title transfer and your warranty

When you buy a pre-construction condominium, you’re prepared for the fact that it will be months – or even up to three years – before you can expect to move in. But what you may not realize is that once your condo unit is built, it still may not be officially yours. In fact, you may have to pay a monthly fee to the builder until the time that the title of your unit can be transferred to you.

“Interim occupancy” is the period between when you can move into your condo and when you officially own it. The move-in date is set by your builder, with permission by your local municipality, once your unit is declared fit for occupancy. This is the point at which your interim occupancy period begins and it will typically last between two to three months. It could, however, stretch much longer, especially if your unit is on a lower floor of a highrise and the upper floors still have to be finished.

During interim occupancy, you have to pay a monthly fee, as determined by the Condominium Act, that covers three things: The interest on the unpaid balance of the purchase price of your condominium unit; municipal taxes estimated for your unit; and common expenses to keep the building running. While you are paying this interim occupancy fee, you won’t be making mortgage payments. Those will start once you have official ownership of your unit, and at that point you will no longer have to pay the interim occupancy fee.

So, the reality is that you might be living in what could feel like a construction zone as the rest of the units and the common elements (lobby, lounge, pool) are completed. Once they are, the project will be registered with the municipality and the individual units will be transferred to the owners. This is when the builder will set your final closing date – when you take full ownership.

What’s important to know is that your new home warranty actually begins as soon as you are granted occupancy of your unit. However, the warranty on amenities or common elements that you’re eagerly waiting to be finished doesn’t begin until the condominium corporation is registered.

To figure out what’s covered by which warranty, you need to start by determining the boundaries of your own unit. You can find this information in the Disclosure document that is attached to your purchase agreement or the registered Declaration and Description filed once the condominium corporation has been registered. This will tell you the unit and common element boundaries and responsibilities for repair and maintenance.

For issues with parts of your unit, it is your responsibility to submit the appropriate warranty form to Tarion. So even if you don’t legally own your unit yet, you should be aware of the warranty form submission deadlines and make sure you submit on time. If you notice defects in the common elements, these should be reported to your condominium corporation representative (sometimes this is the property manager) for them to report to Tarion within their warranty timelines.

Your journey to condo ownership is finally complete on final closing. This is when the completed building is registered and you pay the balance remaining on your final purchase price in addition to any adjustments. When you do, you will receive the title to your new home, your mortgage will be registered on your title and your interim occupancy agreement will end. At this point, your condo is all yours.

While interim occupancy might feel like an exercise in delayed gratification, the final result – a new condo to call your own – should be worth the wait.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders. tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_sep2019_cons_prot_fi

Common elements aren’t a common responsibility

Latest News


Common elements aren’t a common responsibility

Purchasing a condominium is a bit of a two-for-one deal. While you’re buying a unit that has specific physical boundaries, you’re also becoming part owner of amenities that could range from fitness facilities, rooftop terraces and party rooms to less glamourous elements such as heating systems, parking garages and elevators. These are the ‘common elements’ of your condo project. While you are entitled to use them (or at least benefit from them), management of the common elements – and their warranty – is the responsibility of the condominium corporation.

The warranty on your unit begins when your unit is ready for occupancy. The common elements warranty coverage doesn’t begin until the building is finished and the declaration and description for the project is registered by the developer at the local land registry office.

So, what are the declaration and description? They are documents that outline important details for condo owners, such as the boundaries, designated use and proportion of common expenses allocated to the unit, as well as repair and maintenance obligations. If you want to know exactly where your unit ends and the common elements begin, check the declaration.

Although common elements often provide a lot of marketing flash to help drive sales, they can be some of the last things finished in your project. If, for example, you’ve bought a condo on a lower floor in a highrise, you might be among the first to move in – before the common elements have been completed. This means that you might have to wait a while to use that chic party room or luxurious pool that helped sell you on the project in the first place.

Under the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act, the condominium corporation is the ‘owner’ of the common elements of the project. This includes “exclusive use” common elements – things such as your balcony or your backyard – that no one but you gets to use. Unlike unit owners who fill out and submit their own warranty forms for issues in their units, the Condominium Act requires that the condo corporation hire a consultant to prepare a performance audit identifying any deficiencies in the common elements, such as defects in workmanship or Ontario Building Code violations. The performance audit generally includes surveys in which unit owners can report issues they’ve observed in the common elements. The condo corporation will submit the performance audit to Tarion as a warranty claim for the common elements.

The condo corporation will also appoint a designate — often the condominium manager — to work with Tarion and the vendor to resolve deficiencies reported in the audit.

While you as a unit owner do not get involved in the warranty claims process for common elements, you do have a role to play in protecting these shared amenities and ensuring that the warranty coverage on them stays intact. Here are a few examples of what’s not covered by the warranty:

  • Damage caused by unit owners or visitors;
  • Alterations, deletions or additions made by a unit owner or the condo corporation;
  • Damage resulting from improper maintenance by unit owners or the condo corporation.

So if you’re inviting the high school rugby team over for a post-championship celebration, make sure the party room doesn’t become a casualty. Or if you’re planning to do work on any of your exclusive-use common elements – adding a garden to your balcony, for example – notify your condo corporation and obtain permission from them to undertake it.

Common elements are for the common benefit of all. If there are issues, be sure to report them to your condominium manager for them to report to Tarion within their warranty timelines. And if you have any questions about common elements coverage, contact Tarion at 1.877.9TARION or email customerservice@tarion.com.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders. tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_aug19_consum_prot_fi

From industrial to lofty condo conversions

Latest News


From industrial to lofty condo conversions

Condos come in all shapes and sizes. Some buyers prefer slick, modern, multi-storey towers, while others are looking for buildings with more character and maybe a little history. If the latter is what you’re in the market for, there is good news for you.

In many urban areas, warehouses and other old industrial structures are often converted into condos that incorporate some of the building’s more interesting features (large windows, framing, brick walls) into the design. The industry term for these types of developments is “residential condominium conversion projects” or RCCPs. The features of a structure incorporated into an RCCP are called “pre-existing elements.”

Thanks to changes that took effect in January 2018, all of the warranties (One-, two- and seven year) included in the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act (ONHWPA) now apply to these types of condos with one exception: Any pre-existing elements – which, for example, might include an exposed brick interior wall – would not have the one-year warranty regarding the home being constructed in a workmanlike manner and free from defects in material.

Prior to 2018, RCCPs did not come with new home warranty coverage under ONHWPA because they weren’t entirely new buildings. But there’s still more good news. If you’re putting down a deposit on a condo unit that is part of an RCCP, you’ll be happy to know that you’re entitled to the same deposit protection and delayed occupancy coverage as other condo buyers. This means that your deposit, and any amounts paid for upgrades and extras, must be placed in trust and refunded in full if the project does not proceed. This should give you some added confidence that your money is protected if the unexpected happens.

Researching your builder is also easier. Under the new regulations, builders of RCCPs and vendors who wish to sell units in these projects must be registered with Tarion. This means that you are able to look them up on the Ontario Builder Directory on tarion.com.

So what happens if your rental apartment building is being converted into condos? These condos would not be eligible for coverage because the existing building was already built for residential living and converting the building doesn’t involve major changes. Most of the original components remain, with only minor changes made to the building.

This ONHWPA warranty coverage for RCCPs applies to projects where the first purchase agreement in the project is signed on or after Jan. 1, 2018.

If you have your eye on a new loft with a little more history to it, these changes will help you buy with confidence knowing that you now have a safety net. To learn more about this warranty coverage, you can visit Tarion.com or if you have questions, you can email customerservice@tarion.com.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new-home builders.

tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_jun19_cons_prot_fi

Homeowners’ Choice Award winners

Latest News


Homeowners’ Choice Award winners

Anyone buying a new home wants to make sure they’re choosing a great builder; one with experience, integrity, commitment and professionalism. One of the best ways to find that builder is by checking their references. If you hear great things from homebuyers who’ve had a terrific experience with a particular builder, then it’s reasonable to expect you’ll also have a positive experience.

The Homeowners Choice Awards are the ultimate reference check. They’re based on feedback from thousands of new-home buyers in Ontario who shared details of their customer service experience during the homebuying process on everything from signing the Agreement of Purchase and Sale through construction to after-sales service.

This year more than 54,500 newhome owners, who took possession between Oct. 1, 2017 and Sept. 30, 2018, were invited to participate. The third-party research firm that manages the survey and tabulation process received more than 11,300 responses.

The survey results determined the 2019 Homeowners’ Choice Award winners, who are recognized for outstanding customer service in four builder categories: Small, Medium, Large Volume and Highrise.

There has to be enough data available to provide a full picture of a builder’s success in providing top-notch customer service. Builders need at least five new home possessions during the survey timeframe and they must be named in a minimum number of completed surveys in order to qualify for consideration.

When all the surveys were tabulated and the numbers crunched, there were 24 finalists for the four awards. Each of the 24 builders were cited for their responsive, positive approach to customer service. However, the award winners in each category were the builders, large and small, who were identified as consistently striving to create a positive, memorable home buying experience.

Let me tell you about our winners: The Small Volume category covers builders with between five and 20 possessions per year. This year’s winner is Chris King & Sons Construction of Kingsville.

Timberland Homes in Lasalle was named the winner in the Medium Volume category, which includes builders with 21 to 100 possessions per year.

In the Large Volume category (100- plus possessions each year) the winner is Hayhoe Homes in St. Thomas.

Finally, the winner of the Highrise category (100-plus possessions each year) is Brookfield Residential in Markham.

I’d like to thank the many thousands of new-home owners who took the time to tell us about their customer experience with Ontario’s builders.

In the best cases, buyers and builders have forged positive, enduring relationships through the buying, building and after-care process. And just as you’re happy to share a good experience when a friend asks for advice, more than 11,300 homeowners have been kind enough to share their good experience with you.

We’re grateful for their advice. This year, Tarion’s Board of Directors also chose a winner for the Ernest Assaly Award. This prestigious award, which a builder can only receive once in their career, is named after the first Chair of Tarion’s Board of Directors.

It’s intended to honour builders who stand head and shoulders above the crowd; those with a long record of accomplishment in customer service, social responsibility, workmanship, innovation and employee development.

Expectations are so high, in fact, that only a handful of builders are even considered for the award. I’d like to think that Ernest Assaly would be proud to know that this year’s winner of the award named for him is The Daniels Corporation.

In a world of Pinterest boards and online communities, it can sometimes be difficult to get the kind of dependable advice we all want when we’re making one of the biggest purchases of our life. The Homeowners’ Choice Awards represent a solid source of advice from the real experts: Ontario’s new homeowners.

Congratulations to all of our winners!

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corp. tarion.com Facebook.com/TarionWarrantyCorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_may19_home_builder_fi

Inspecting your new home before it’s your home, the pre-delivery inspection

Latest News


Inspecting your new home before it’s your home, the pre-delivery inspection

When you buy a new car, one of the last steps before you drive it off the lot involves the salesperson showing you all the features of your vehicle and how they work. It’s the same with a new home. Before you get the keys, you and your builder will do a Pre-Delivery Inspection or PDI. This is an important step – not only does it familiarize you with your new home but it also helps you protect your warranty rights.

The PDI usually takes place a week or two before closing and involves a formal walk-through of the finished home with your builder. During this inspection, any defects, missing or non-functional items need to be noted on a PDI form. This form serves as a record of the state of the home when it was turned over.

Keep in mind however that this is not a warranty form.

Once you take possession, any issues that your builder has not resolved from your PDI – or any new issues that you’ve identified in your first month of ownership – should be recorded on a 30-Day warranty form and submitted to Tarion.

By far, the most common defects we see reported on the 30-Day forms are what are called ‘fit and finish’ issues. That can include scratches or scuffs on cabinetry or floors, cracked millwork, poorly-applied paint or uneven floor tiles.

These are all issues that can – and should – be identified during the PDI. If for example, you report gouges in your hardwood on your 30-Day form but it wasn’t on your PDI form, it may be hard to prove that they existed before you moved in. So here are a few tips to help you with your PDI:

  • Open and close all windows to be sure the latches work, screens are in place and windows slide freely on their tracks.
  • Make sure all doors are painted and that their locks work properly.
  • Look at the walls in each room to make sure there are no nail pops or visible seams. Check out the baseboard and woodwork around the doors to see if there are gaps that still need to be filled with caulking. Do all the light switches work? You should be checking each one. Check outlets with a small lamp or nightlight.
  • Test for squeaky floors as you walk around.
  • Check the bathtubs and sinks to make sure there are no scratches or chips.
  • Take photos of missing or damaged items. These will help with any future warranty claims.
  • If there’s construction debris, tarps or other things obstructing your view of areas of the home, it should be recorded on the form that you weren’t able to inspect that particular area.
  • Take your time, take a good look at everything and don’t let yourself be rushed. This is the time when a builder should be explaining how the appliances work, where you’ll find the water cut-off and how to operate your home’s mechanical and HVAC systems. We recommend that builders spend about one hour per 1,000 square feet on the PDI.

While your PDI is an opportunity to document the state of your home before you move in, once you take possession, your one-year, two-year and seven year warranties kick in. This warranty coverage is outlined in your Homeowner Information Package – something that your builder should provide you with either at the time of your PDI or when you receive the keys to your new home.

If they don’t, you can download a copy from tarion.com. If you have questions about the PDI or how to get the issues you may identify resolved, you can contact Tarion at 1.877.9TARION or email customerservice@tarion.com and our customer service team will be happy to help.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corp.
tarion.com
Facebook.com/TarionWarrantyCorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


Mattamy Homes

There’s never been a better time to buy new – at Mattamy Homes

Latest News


There’s never been a better time to buy new – at Mattamy Homes

Since 1978 Mattamy has been making the dream of homeownership a reality, having built more than 90,000 new homes and more than 11,000 condo suites across hundreds of communities. Today, Mattamy is proudly the largest privately-owned home builder in North America.

With a 40-year history of building new homes and communities people love to live in, Mattamy has amassed an incredible list of reasons to buy new. From the choice to personalize your floorplan through Mattamy’s Architect’s Choice Options Program, to beautiful master-planned communities designed with living a fuller, happier life in mind.

Mattamy offers a full range of trendy condos, thoughtfully designed townhomes and detached homes. Mattamy has the GTA covered from east to west and south to north. Take a drive around the company’s GTA neighbourhoods this spring to discover a home and community exactly where you want to live. In all communities across Canada, Mattamy is offering your dream home at your dream price. The time has never been better than now to buy a new Mattamy home to get a head start on creating new family memories.

More great reasons to buy new from Mattamy;

Unleash your inner designer. Mattamy’s Design Studio lets you choose from a huge variety of modern and traditional finishes including hardwood, granite, quartz and so much more.

Enjoy peace of mind. Mattamy and Tarion offer a seven-year structural warranty on all new homes, giving you peace of mind when purchasing your new home.

Move into a great neighbourhood. Mattamy meticulously selects the areas in which it builds. Ensuring homeowners have access to schools, recreation centres, convenient shopping, dining and entertainment is paramount.

Have everything at your fingertips. Mattamy condos have thoughtfully designed suites, modern features and finishes, and life enhancing amenities like fitness facilities, rooftop terraces and stylish common areas.

Move in and start enjoying. No renovations required, sit back and enjoy your new home.

Brand new amenities. Park, recreation and nature trails outside your front door.

Master-planned communities. Curved streets and homes closer to the street create an inviting, family friendly neighbourhood.

MATTAMY HOMES

With great advantages like these, and amazing new home and condo prices and incentives, there’s never been a better time to buy new from Mattamy. Visit the web site to learn more about all their communities.


SHARE  

Featured Products