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Local Focus: Mississauga

Standing out from the crowd in Mississauga

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Standing out from the crowd in Mississauga

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots as a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that the community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys. 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

Waterfront recreation

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

• More than 288.42 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

• Living Arts Centre

• Mississauga Celebration Square

• Paramount Fine Foods Centre

• Sheridan College Business School

• Square One Shopping Centre

• University of Toronto Mississauga

Select housing developments

20/Twenty Towns by Consulate Development Group

Eleven 11 Clarkson by Saxon Developments

Jewels of the Meadows by Ideal Developments

Lakeview Village by Lakeview Community Partners

Parc Towns by The Daniels Corporation

The Clarkson Urban Towns by Haven Developments

Tuxedo Park by Maple Valley Development Corp.


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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

And now, literally at the time of writing, the City was hosting a Town Hall on seeking independence from the Region of Peel.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Succession

As for seeking its independence from Peel, Crombie’s office points to the following as motivation:

Population: Mississauga has the population to warrant becoming an independent city similar to other large municipalities such as Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa.

Stability: Mississauga is fiscally strong, has strong resident support and has the necessary capacity and experience to operate as an independent city.

Municipal service: A number of duplications, barriers and complexities in municipal service delivery could be eliminated if Mississauga became an independent city.

Future city building: As an independent City, Mississauga would have full autonomy to focus on City initiatives related to its future growth and development.

Cost: Mississauga pays 60 per cent of the overall property tax levy, yet owns only 29 per cent of regional roads.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to well, Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

More than 288.42 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

• Square One Shopping Centre

• Mississauga Celebration Square

• Living Arts Centre

• Paramount Fine Foods Centre

• University of Toronto Mississauga

• Sheridan College Business School

Select condo projects

Aspire Condominiums by Conservatory Group

Daniels City Centre by The Daniels Corporation

Edge Towers by Solmar Development Corp.

Exchange District by Camrost Felcorp

Pinnacle Grand Park 2 by Pinnacle International

TANU Condos by Edenshaw Developments


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EDITOR'S CHOICE: Dunpar Homes

EDITOR’S CHOICE: Dunpar Homes

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EDITOR’S CHOICE: Dunpar Homes

Streetsville Centre is like a village within a village

Canada’s sixth largest city has a long and varied history starting with Mississauga First Nations who lived in the Credit River valley — about 2,000 sites have so far been excavated in the area. Europeans came as early as the 1600s, but settlement didn’t start until 1805, when the British government entered trade talks with the Mississaugas. Through the 1800s, settlers took up residence along the major water systems – especially at the wide Credit River where it was relatively easy to transport essential goods such as lumber – and established the settlements of Clarkson, Cooksville, Erindale, Malton, Meadowvale, Port Credit and Streetsville.

Like Toronto with its neighbourhoods, Mississauga has distinct areas; the 13-kilometre Lake Ontario shoreline, bustling shopping centres and thriving commercial areas, highrise condo towers, dense lowrise neighbourhoods and quaint historic villages like Streetsville, with intact main streets and charming heritage storefronts.

The population of Streetsville has grown from 5,000 in the 1960s to about 50,000, with over half holding university or college degrees, 85 per cent owning their homes and an average household income of $124,255. And it’s young – the average age is 38, with a third of the population between 25 and 44.

Thanks to its thriving facilities – shops and restaurants, community facilities, entertainment, schools, parks and great housing – Streetsville is known as a community node within the city of Mississauga, which means it will be a focus of infrastructure growth in future.

Nestled on the Credit River, with parks and hiking trails, this hidden gem has excellent elementary and high schools in walking distance, community centres, and the village’s main street has all the services you need. Major shopping is a few minutes drive away at Erin Mills Town Centre, Square One, Dixie Outlet Mall and Sherway Gardens.

An integrated community with this kind of access is the foundation of quality living. According to Jay Walljasper, author of The Great Neighbourhood Book, one of the worst trends after World War II was to segregate houses from retail shops and places of work, leading to greater reliance on cars, which isolated people from each other. But modernism seemed to pass Streetsville by, and its charming main street vibe remains. Neighbourhoods like this are sought after because they’re more enjoyable and tend to encourage community building.

That sentiment resonates with John Zanini, president of Dunpar Homes, who actively seeks out land in existing neighbourhoods. He lives in a Dunpar home himself, appreciating the advantages of being close to coffee shops, bookstores and local parks where people tend to meet and gather.

The 201-unit development of Streetsville Centre is like a village within a village; streets are closed off from main thoroughfares, making it safe for children to play and go in and out of each other’s homes. People are comfortable being out and about, walking to the store, or strolling through the park, making it a safe place to live, and fostering a sense of community spirit.

Steps to the GO Transit station, it’s the perfect location for a commute to Toronto, and a five-minute walk will get you to the main street for retail shopping, dining and entertainment.

The exclusive community offers three-bedroom, spacious townhome designs that range from 1,500 to 1,875 square feet. Each one features a 240-square-foot rooftop patio, two-car garages, unmatched landscaping and a ton of standard luxury finishes like gourmet kitchens, luxury appliances, high quality construction, technology conservation and four levels of guarantees including two from Tarion. Prices start at $869,990.

DUNPAR HOMES

Located at 80 Thomas Street, the Sales Centre is open by appointment only.

416.318.9112

DunparHomes.com


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LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

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LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

by Gale Beeby

The sixth largest city in Canada continues to grow

HOUSING OPTIONS

Initially a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga’s growth has given it a unique identity. In 1935, the first suburban developments – corresponding with the opening of the QEW from Highway 27 to Highway 10 – popped up in the area south of the Dixie Road and QEW interchange. Over time, development moved north and west and large-scale developments started to happen in the 1960s and ’70s. Mississauga saw a condo boom starting in the 1990s and the area around Square One is now full of highrise buildings. Click here to see a list of homes for sale.

LEISURE PURSUITS

There is a lot to do in Mississauga, including a visit to the Art Gallery of Mississauga and the Living Arts Centre, which offers a number of musical performances, plays and children’s activities. The city’s largest festival happens on Canada Day and the Tree-Lighting Ceremony and New Year’s Eve bash at Celebration Square at City Hall are always popular.

Streetsville holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival the first weekend of June and Port Credit holds multiple festivals throughout the year, including Buskerfest, the Waterfront Festival, and the Southside Shuffle Blues & Jazz Fastival. In Malton, the Sikh community holds its annual Khalsa Day Parade, which attracts more than 100,000 people.

PARKS & REC

Mississauga boasts more than 522 parks and 225 kilometres of trails and woodlands. Some parks provide serenity, while others boast a variety of active recreational facilities, including indoor and outdoor skating rinks, cricket and soccer pitches, baseball and softball diamonds, football fields, tennis courts and childrens’ play areas and splash pads.

There are many golf courses in the city, including Derrydale, Credit Valley, Toronto Golf, Streetsville Glen, Lionhead, Grand Highland, Mississuaga Golf, BraeBen and Lakeview.

RETAIL THERAPY

Each of the villages that now make up Mississauga have lovely boutique-style shopping with cafés and restaurants to suit every taste and budget. Square One Shopping Centre, located at the City Centre, has over 350 stores and services and is surrounded by several bars and restaurants, a multi-screen movie theatre, City Hall, the Central Library and Playdium. The Erin Mills Town Centre is the second-largest mall in the city and is notable for its clock tower, mini-golf course and daycare centre.

EASY ACCESS

Mississauga is served by seven major highways, including the QEW, Highways 401, 403, 409, 410, 427 and 407. Mississauga Transit is the third-largest municipal transit system in Ontario, servicing about 43 million riders per year, and connecting with the TTC, Brampton Transit, Oakville Transit and GO Transit.

BY THE NUMBERS

Population: 722,000

Motto: Pride in our past, faith in our future

Walk scores:

City Centre: 91

Port Credit: 88

Erin Mills: 74

Cooksville: 68

Clarkson: 55

Applewood Heights: 52

Streetsville: 45

Sheridan Homeland: 44

Lakeview: 42

Lorne Park: 15

Mississauga.ca


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Streetsville Centre

Streetsville Centre

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Streetsville Centre

It’s All About the Location

Location, location, location is still the real estate mantra when buying, but these days that desired location could actually be somewhere quite different. For the modern down-sizer, a good location is anywhere that offers a better quality of life, so that more time can be spent doing the things that they want to do.

In the northwest corner of Mississauga is the quaint, historic community of Streetsville. It’s here that Dunpar Homes introduced Streetsville Centre – a new development right in the middle of it, at 80 Thomas Street.

This 200-unit enclave of luxury custom towns and semis is within walking distance to everything you could possibly need, and only a quick, 30-second jaunt to the GO Station across the road. A two-minute stroll puts you on the main street, where you’ll find charming shops and restaurants. Another five minutes and you’re at Streetsville Memorial Park, with its soccer field, baseball diamond, community centre, outdoor pool, hiking trail and 100-seat picnic grounds. Highways 401, 403 and the QEW are close by, and Toronto Pearson International Airport is a 10-minute drive.

When Jane Jacobs penned her now famous The Rise and Fall of American Cities, she noted how urban renewal usually led to the loss of neighbourhoods and an elimination of local experiences. As a result, Jacobs lobbied to save old buildings – those familiar landmarks that create a sense of place.

The sleepy village of Streetsville escaped the demolition policies of the 70s and 80s, leaving many of the old buildings intact. The relatively small population keeps the town centre accessible.

Dunpar Homes follows similar planning principles and looks for desirable infill properties that are close to existing amenities, like services, retail and transportation routes. Such locations are coveted for their organic growth, while creating that solid sense of place that Jacobs found to be so important.

Originally founded in 1818 on a 648,000-acre tract of land (the last on the Credit River), Streetsville was named after a Niagara surveyor – Timothy Street. In exchange for his services he was granted 1,000 acres on the fast flowing river, where he built his own home in 1825.

Off the beaten track, Streetsville’s architecture and cultural diversity grew at a slow pace over two centuries. Jacobs believed that adding a few buildings every year created a healthy urban fabric, with structures of all ages, and styles, represented.

The spacious homes at Streetsville Centre range in size from 1,500 to 2,600 square feet, with roof-top decks and balconies off the kitchen. Prices start in the mid $800,000s for three-bedroom designs that have well-proportioned principal rooms and two-car garages. Interior features include, granite countertops in the kitchen and bathrooms, an under-mount kitchen sink and a frameless glass ensuite shower, as well as smooth ceilings and stainless appliances.

CONTACT INFORMATION

The Information Centre is located at 80 Thomas Street in Mississauga.

416.236.9800

dunparhomes.com


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Neighbourhood Watch: Mississauga

Neighbourhood Watch: Mississauga

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Neighbourhood Watch: Mississauga

by Gale Beeby

Housing Options

Initially a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga’s growth has given it a unique identity. In 1935, the first suburban developments – corresponding with the opening of the QEW from Highway 27 to Highway 10 – popped up in the area south of the Dixie Road and QEW interchange. Over time, development moved north and west and large-scale developments started, to happen in the 1960s and ’70s. Mississauga saw a condo boom starting in the 1990s and the area around Square One is now full of highrise buildings.

Click here for a list of condos for sale in the Mississauga area.

Leisure Pursuits

There is a lot to do in Mississauga, including a visit to the Art Gallery of Mississauga and the Living Arts Centre, which offers a number of musical performances, plays and children’s activities. The city’s largest festival happens on Canada Day and the Tree-Lighting Ceremony and New Year’s Eve bash at Celebration Square at City Hall are always popular. Carassauga, The Festival of Cultures, happens during May and is the second-largest cultural festival in Canada. Many cultural events are held throughout the year in Celebration Square. Streetsville holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival the first weekend of June and Port Credit holds multiple festivals throughout the year, including Buskerfest, the Waterfront Festival, and the Southside Shuffle Blues & Jazz Fastival.

The Mississauga Steelheads of the Ontario Hockey League play at the Hershey Centre and the Chargers of the Ontario Junior A Hockey League play at Port Credit Arena.

Parks & Rec

Mississauga boasts more than 522 parks and 225 kilometres of trails and woodlands. Some parks provide serenity, while others boast a variety of active recreational facilities, including indoor and outdoor skating rinks, cricket and soccer pitches, baseball and softball diamonds, football fields, tennis courts and childrens’ play areas and splash pads. Mississauga boasts world-class synchronized swimming and rowing clubs, in addition to canoeing, soccer and figure skating clubs. There are many golf courses in the city, including Derrydale, Credit Valley, Toronto Golf, Streetsville Glen, Lionhead, Grand Highland, Mississuaga Golf, BraeBen and Lakeview.

Retail Therapy

Each of the villages that now make up Mississauga have lovely boutique-style shopping with cafés and restaurants to suit every taste and budget. Square One Shopping Centre, located at the City Centre, has more than 350 stores and services and is surrounded by several bars and restaurants, a multi-screen movie theatre, City Hall, the Central Library and Playdium. The Erin Mills Town Centre is the second-largest mall in the city and is notable for its clock tower, mini-golf course and daycare centre. The Dixie Outlet Mall – the city’s first indoor shopping centre – is home to premium brand outlets and the Fantastic Flea Market.

Easy Access

Mississauga is served by seven major highways, including the QEW, Highways 401, 403, 409, 410, 427 and 407. Mississauga Transit is the third-largest municipal transit system in Ontario, servicing about 43 million riders per year. There are more than 80 routes through the city connecting with the TTC, Brampton Transit, Oakville Transit and GO Transit. Mississauga Transit operates express service from the Islington subway station to Mississauga City Centre, the Airport Corporate, Gateway and Meadowvale business districts.

BY THE NUMBERS

Population: 782,000

Nickname: Sauga

Average walk score: 59

Most walkable area: Port Credit, 90

Mississauga.ca


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Streetsville Centre

Streetsville Centre

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Streetsville Centre

Making luxury more affordable

Dunpar Homes has made buying a new townhome in the heart of Streetsville a whole lot easier. Streetsville Centre is a 200-unit enclave of luxury towns and semis starting from the mid-$800s.

Home ownership is becoming out of reach for new purchasers in the GTA. While still a great investment, affordability and debt loads are of great concern. In addition, commuting and traffic congestion are getting worse, and finding the perfect (affordable) location is harder to find.

With the Ontario government’s Fair Housing Plan unveiled last April, the real estate market slowdown is no secret. Intended to bring stability and affordability to renters and homebuyers, the plan included a 15 per cent foreign buyer tax, and stricter regulations on real estate agents.

To help offset any further deterrents, Dunpar Homes is offering a three-year mortgage, for qualified buyers, at an interest rate of 1.99 per cent. New home buyers will also receive $25,000 off the purchase price, or $30,000 in design credits for upgrades.

The well-established community of Streetsville was founded in 1818, and still maintains its historic charm. With easy access to the GO train and major thoroughfares, getting to where you need to go is comfortable and convenient. Located within the city of Mississauga, Streetsville also benefits from a plethora of amenities, medical services, shopping and entertainment – many within walking distance. Streetsville Memorial Park includes a soccer field, baseball diamond, community centre, outdoor pool, picnic grounds and hiking trails. The Ontario Racquet Club is a 150,000-square-foot facility with indoor, and outdoor, tennis courts, squash courts and hot yoga classes, as well as pilates and spinning studios. Rattray Marsh Conservation Area and the Riverwood Conservancy are located close by.

With plenty of green space, there’s room to breathe, along with a wide variety of outdoor activities like cycling, rollerblading and hiking. The nearby Credit River offers canoeing and kayaking opportunities. The river is also well-stocked thanks to the stewardship of the Credit River Anglers Association (CRAA). Migrating birds tend to like this area, as well, making it popular with bird watchers.

Streetsville Centre showcases a selection of well-designed homes, with the one thing that is often lacking – lots of storage. All models include three bedrooms and two-car garages, and range in size from 1,500 to 2,600 square feet.

Downsizing baby boomers, who are active and want to remain so, are on a quest to find the perfect home that satisfies their desire for a (somewhat) slower pace, while remaining vital and engaged. Dunpar Homes has come up with the perfect new home community at Streetsville Centre.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Call or register online to book an appointment.

(416) 318-9112
dunparhomes.com



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Local Focus: Mississauga

Local Focus: Mississauga

Latest News


Local Focus: Mississauga

by Gale Beeby

HOUSING OPTIONS

Initially a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga’s growth has given it a unique identity. In 1935, the first suburban developments – corresponding with the opening of the QEW from Highway 27 to Highway 10 – popped up in the area south of the Dixie Road and QEW interchange. Over time, development moved north and west and large-scale developments started to happen in the 1960s and ’70s. Mississauga saw a condo boom starting in the 1990s and the area around Square One is now full of highrise buildings. Click here to see a list of homes for sale.

LEISURE PURSUITS

There is a lot to do in Mississauga, including a visit to the Art Gallery of Mississauga and the Living Arts Centre, which offers a number of musical performances, plays and children’s activities.

The city’s largest festival happens on Canada Day and the Tree-Lighting Ceremony and New Year’s Eve bash at Celebration Square at City Hall are always popular.

Carassauga, The Festival of Cultures, happens during May and is the second-largest cultural festival in Canada.

Streetsville holds its annual Breaf and Honey Festival the first weekend of June and Port Credit holds multiple festivals throughout the year, including Buskerfest, the Waterfront Festival, and the Southside Shuffle Blues & Jazz Fastival. In Malton, the Sikh community holds its annual Khalsa Day Parade, which attracts more than 100,000 people.

RETAIL THERAPY

Each of the villages that now make up Mississauga have lovely boutique-style shopping with cafés and restaurants to suit every taste and budget. Square One Shopping Centre, located at the City Centre, has 350 stores and services and is surrounded by several bars and restaurants, a multi-screen movie theatre, City Hall, the Central Library and Playdium. The Erin Mills Town Centre is the second-largest mall in the city and is notable for its clock tower, mini-golf course and daycare centre.

EASY ACCESS

Mississauga is served by seven major highways, including the QEW, Highways 401, 403, 409, 410, 427 and 407 ETR. Mississauga Transit is the third-largest municipal transit system in Ontario, servicing about 43 million riders per year, and connecting with the TTC, Brampton Transit, Oakville Transit and GO Transit.

PARKS & REC

Mississauga boasts more than 522 parks and 225 kilometres of trails and woodlands. Some parks provide serenity, while others boast a variety of active recreational facilities, including indoor and outdoor skating rinks, cricket and soccer pitches, baseball and softball diamonds, football fields, tennis courts and childrens’ play areas.

Mississauga is also home to successful athletes and boasts world-class synchronized swimming and rowing clubs, in addition to canoeing, soccer and figure skating clubs.

There are many golf courses in the city, including Derrydale, Credit Valley, Toronto Golf, Streetsville Glen, Lionhead, and Grand Highland.

BY THE NUMBERS

Population: 761,000

Incorporated: 1974

Motto: Pride in our past, faith in our future

Walk Scores:

  • City Centre: 91
  • Port Credit: 88
  • Erin Mills: 74
  • Cooksville: 68
  • Clarkson: 55
  • Applewood Heights: 52
  • Streetsville: 45
  • Sheridan Homeland: 44
  • Lakeview: 42
  • Lorne Park: 15

Mississauga.ca



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Editor's Choice: Dunpar Homes

Editor’s Choice: Dunpar Homes

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Editor’s Choice: Dunpar Homes

Streetsville Centre is a great spot for young urban couples and families

Location, location, location is still the real estate mantra when buying, but it probably means something a little different these days. For the modern urbanite, a good location is anywhere that gives them more time for living and less time spent in a car.

Who’d have thought quaint historic Streetsville — in the northwest corner of Mississauga — would ever become a destination spot for young urban couples or families? But it’s become just that, and Dunpar Homes is about to launch a new townhome development, Streetsville Centre, right in the middle of it at 80 Thomas St.

The 200-unit enclave of executive back-to-back townhomes is walking distance to everything; 30 seconds to the GO Transit station across the road, two minutes to the main street retail and restaurants, and five minutes to Streetsville Memorial Park with its soccer field, baseball diamond, community centre, outdoor pool, hiking trail and 100-seat picnic grounds.

The homes are spacious, ranging from 1,500 to 1,875 square feet with rooftop decks or balconies off the kitchen. All have three bedrooms, two-car garages, and well-proportioned principal rooms, with prices starting in the mid-$800,000s.

Interior standard features include granite counters in kitchen and baths, undermount kitchen sink, frameless glass shower door in ensuite, smooth ceilings and stainless steel kitchen appliances. The space extends outdoors with a lovely 240-square-foot private rooftop patio on the back-to-back townhomes.

When Jane Jacobs penned her now famous book, The Rise and Fall of American Cities, she noted how urban renewal usually meant the loss of neighbourhoods and an elimination of local people’s experiences. It led Jacobs to lobby hard to save old buildings that were part of a community’s tradition, those familiar landmarks that stuck in people’s memories and create a sense of place.

Thanks to being such a sleepy village until after the 1970s and ’80s demolition policies, most of Streetsville’s old buildings remain standing, its population relatively small and town centre walkable.

Those same good urban planning principles have led Dunpar Homes to consistently build close to centres with existing amenities – transit, retail and transportation routes. Such centres present great potential for organic and healthy growth, while creating that solid sense of place that Jacobs celebrated.

Originally founded in 1818 on a 648,000-acre tract of land, the last on the Credit River, Streetsville was named for Timothy Street, the Niagara-area surveyor who charted this huge tract. In exchange for his services, he was granted 1,000 acres on the fast-flowing Credit River where he built his home in 1825.

Being off the beaten track, Streetsville has been able to grow slowly over two centuries, developing an architectural and cultural diversity over time. This is what Jacobs believed made for a healthy urban fabric – adding a few projects a year so that the town has buildings of all ages and architectural types.

Streetsville has continued this tradition with a few new developments added each year. And Dunpar’s more traditional townhome style blends well with both the heritage homes and some of the more recent modern condo developments. Thanks to extremely high construction values, these townhomes will be there for a very long time, contributing to the town’s architectural fabric.

DUNPAR HOMES
Streetsville Centre

By appointment only.

(416) 318-9112
DunparHomes.com


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