Tag Archives: Net Zero

Affordable Energy Efficiency

Affordable Energy Efficiency

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Affordable Energy Efficiency

Images courtesy of Butterwick Construction & Carpentry Ltd.

Newly built Canadian homes have been steadily increasing in energy efficiency over the years – a code-built home today is 47% more efficient than one from 1985. Still, the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) and its members are hard at work pursuing still greater energy efficiency innovations for voluntary adoption, while at the same time advocating that regulation wait until next levels don’t reduce affordability. But to truly address climate change in the housing sector, it is the existing housing stock that needs to be upgraded. Enter CHBA and its leading members again, as the pursuit of innovation for affordable deep energy retrofits working all the way towards net zero renovations kicks into gear.

Increasing Energy Efficiency in New and Older Homes

In new housing, industry leaders are paving the way to greater energy efficiency through voluntary programs such as the CHBA Net Zero Home Labelling Program. Founded by CHBA’s Net Zero Energy Housing Council, which is now five years old, CHBA’s leading members are providing discerning homeowners with net zero and net zero ready homes today, while working to innovate for greater affordability and increasing market penetration with each year.

But improving new homes alone won’t achieve the national goal, and it won’t help the millions of Canadians who live in older homes and want improved energy efficiency. Canada has 14 million residential residences, and approximately half of the current housing stock was built before 1985. Many of these older buildings are far behind new homes when it comes to energy efficiency. Even if all the new homes built from now until 2030 (say 200,000 per year, or 2 million total) were built to zero emissions, we still wouldn’t hit our environmental target – not even close.

Why Retrofits Are the Future

Renovating the existing housing stock is the only way for Canada to reach its greenhouse gases target in the housing industry. And with the half of our housing consuming twice as much energy as everything built since, that’s a lot of opportunity for renovators.

Canadians want their homes to be energy efficient. Maybe it’s a sense of social responsibility, uncertainty around utilities, simply a desire to reduce increasing energy bills, or a bit of each, but today’s homeowners are looking for improved energy performance. In fact, according to CHBA’s Home Buyer Preference Survey, powered by Avid Ratings Canada, nearly 90% of recent homebuyers indicated that having an energy efficient home was important to them. The survey gathers opinions of thousands of recent new homebuyers each year, and their preferences can easily be applied to renovations as well.

As Canadians seek higher levels of performance and comfort, the industry continues to innovate to strive to meet those desires in the most cost-effective fashion. And that innovation is needed to begin retrofitting older homes, which come with their own unique challenges.

Older renovated homes like this extremely efficient retrofit by Butterwick Construction & Carpentry Ltd. in Edmonton, Alta., are voluntarily paving the way to Net Zero renovations.

Setting the Stage

Drastically improving the energy efficiency of an older home requires an in-depth technical understanding of building science. And the best examples we have of that are by looking at Net Zero Homes.

A Net Zero Energy (NZE) home is one that produces the same amount of energy it uses, on an annualized basis. These homes are extremely well-built: they have very airtight, well insulated building envelopes with high-performance windows and doors. They also use efficient, right-sized mechanical systems in order to reach higher levels of energy performance. In addition to being incredibly efficient, NZE homes have built-in renewable energy generation (mostly solar panels). In some cases, they incorporate energy storage systems which allow homeowners to bank energy for future use. A Net Zero Energy Ready home (NZEr) is built to the same level of performance, but installation of the renewable energy component is left to the occupant at a future date – a popular option among NZE builders and homebuyers.

In both cases, the result is a home that delivers unrivaled levels of occupant comfort, minimum environmental impacts, and utility bills with much lower energy consumption.

CHBA is leading efforts to bring NZE and NZEr homes to market as affordably as possible. As the industry voluntarily learns new efficiencies with the technology and building practices involved, building costs are decreasing. CHBA’s aim is to share efficiencies and innovation among industry-leading CHBA members so that eventually the cost of owning a NZEr home is comparable to one built to conventional standards.

The first step was a demonstration program in 2015, backed by Owens Corning Canada and the federal government, that saw the construction of 26 such homes across Canada by five leading residential builders. Based on this success, CHBA launched its Net Zero Home Labelling Program to ensure that each participating home is qualified by a third party to meet the specified technical requirements. The program also includes training requirements for participating builder members and energy advisors.

And now, that scope involves renovations.

Bringing Net Zero Solutions to Renovations

The move to bring NZE homes and renovations to the marketplace is being spearheaded by the residential construction industry itself, through the work of CHBA’s Net Zero Energy Housing Council.

A broad collaboration involving homebuilders, manufacturers, utilities, design experts, government agencies, and service providers, the Council’s primary focus is on how to support innovation in the industry with the goal of creating a market advantage for CHBA builder and renovator members voluntarily pursuing Net Zero Energy.

Currently, they’re working to extend the Net Zero Program to renovations, so that older homes that meet the program requirements can receive the Net Zero/Ready label. To date, more than 100 new homes in Canada have received the label, which includes third-party verification. The program is growing exponentially each year as demand grows for not only energy efficiency at an affordable price point, but the comfort and health benefits that come with NZE homes.

Learn more about the CHBA’s Net Zero Home Labelling Program at CHBA.ca/nze and NetZeroHome.com.

Sonja Winkelmann, CHBA’s Director, Net Zero Energy Housing


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Milton's Bronte West by Howland Green Homes

Milton’s Bronte West is where sustainability is a way of life

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Milton’s Bronte West is where sustainability is a way of life

Howland Green Homes recently introduced the first net positive residential condominium building in Canada – Milton’s Bronte West Condominiums. This development focuses on conservation, ultimately saving money for each homeowner. “We can reduce our consumption greatly and it’s relatively easy to accomplish,” says Dave de Sylva, president of Howland Green Homes. “We need to use much less energy, in general, and start using today’s energy, such as wind and solar, rather than carbon-based options.”

Dollars and sense

The end result of Howland Green’s commitment to sustainability, is that Milton’s Bronte West has some of the lowest condo fees in the country. Traditional condo fees are around .46 cents per square foot. Therefore, a 1,000-square-foot condo would cost an additional $460 per month for maintenance and the like. Here, sustainability equates with dramatically lower condo fees of only .14 cents per square foot, or $140 per month.

Along with advanced construction innovation, Milton’s Bronte West will be powered by the sun and geothermal energy. This net positive community is a consummate combination of ecology, economy and technological advancement. “The building will produce a negative carbon footprint on the global atmosphere,” says de Sylva.

Beautifully designed two- and three- bedroom suites, some with dens, range in size from 1,078 to 1,607 square feet. Open-concept floorplans feature luxury finishes throughout, and the latest in high efficiency appliances. Parking and lockers are also included in the purchase price.

In addition to all the environmental benefits, the community includes professionally landscaped grounds, and a floral garden, with a variety of areas to relax and reflect. The gazebo, barbecues and tables make hosting family events a pleasure. There’s also a playground for the grandchildren, and a fenced-in area for pets. Indoor amenities include a fully equipped fitness facility, a yoga studio, a party room and a games room.

Milton’s Bronte West Condominiums are located just across the street from the Milton District Hospital and minutes from downtown.

Making their mark

Howland Green Homes is committed to reducing their carbon footprint. Beyond Net Zero (BNZ), or net positive, homebuilding helps to produce more energy than is consumed. They design and construct buildings that use approximately 18 per cent of the normal amount of operating energy, when compared with other building techniques. Clean, renewable energy is used on, and off, site, resulting in a reduction of fossil fuel reliance.

Not only will homeowners save on condo fees at Milton’s Bronte West, but they will also save thousands of energy dollars, and leave a cleaner ecological footprint.

CONTACT INFORMATION

The Sales Centre is located at 420 Bronte Street South, Suite 114 in Milton. For more information call (289.851.0701) or visit the website.


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CHBA Connects - Book Smarts

Book smarts – An exclusive sneak peek inside the CHBA’s new renovators’ manual – Apr/May2019

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Book smarts – An exclusive sneak peek inside the CHBA’s new renovators’ manual – Apr/May2019

As you know from previous columns, CHBA has a Renovators’ Manual in the works. Similar to CHBA’s best-selling Builders’ Manual, the Renovators’ version applies building science to renovations. Existing buildings are going to be important as Canada takes steps to limit climate change. This month we offer a small sample of what readers can expect from the new book, when it is released to the public.

Canada has more than 14 million existing houses. Over half of these were built before 1980. That’s important because these older homes were not built to be anywhere near as energy efficient as houses being constructed today. In fact, a house built today is 47% better in terms of energy efficiency than a house built in 1985.

Building Codes are addressing the energy efficiency of new houses. Current plans are for new houses to reach Net Zero Ready levels of energy efficiency by about 2030. Currently, builders are constructing approximately 200,000 housing units per year. This number has been quite consistent in recent years, although it is expected to slowly drop in the face of an aging population. Some simple math shows us that over the next 10 years, building at the anticipated rate, we can expect between 1.8 and 2 million more houses to be created. While these will be far more efficient than the houses we have now, there is no scenario for reducing the total amount of energy used by homes without addressing the existing housing stock.

The Renovators’ Manual will help with those renovations as renovators are asked to significantly improve the energy efficiency of existing houses. Looking a little deeper, this means that renovators will be asked to “apply” the building science they know to existing houses. This is not as easy as it might seem, since applying building science to the materials and systems that are already installed is quite different than starting with a clean slate when designing a new build. The process also involves combining new materials with the existing structure they are renovating.

Net Zero Ready houses are typically being constructed with R-65 ceilings, R-40 walls, triple-glazed windows, R-35 basement walls, and R-10 under the basement floor slab. They will also have air tightness of less than 1.0 air change per hour at 50 Pa of depressurization (ACH50). Even the most ambitious renovation of an older home would find these performance characteristics difficult to match, but renovators will want to know how close they can come, and how to avoid technical problems in doing so.

The challenge will come from the correct “application” of the building science. The houses that need the most work are expected to be the older ones. Many of these have little to no insulation. Even if these houses have been renovated previously, it is unlikely that the renovation will have added a significant amount of insulation. It will be useful to review the most likely starting condition of the house, for example;

  • 2×4 wood frame or masonry structural exterior walls
  • Little or no insulation in the walls
  • Little insulation in the ceiling
  • Little or no insulation on basement walls or under the basement floor
  • Poor airtightness characteristics (i.e. drafty)
  • Large humidity swings – low in winter and high in summer
  • Large furnace and/or air conditioner
  • No heat recovery ventilator – bathroom fans or windows for ventilation
  • May have a wood-burning fireplace
  • Poor drainage around foundation
  • Double-glazed windows

Other important considerations are the climate where the house is located, and the characteristics of the occupants of the house. A maritime climate has different characteristics than a prairie climate. A house with two seniors has different operational characteristics than a house with young children. As renovators, we can’t change the occupants, so we need to provide a home that suits their specific lifestyle and needs.

In the case of the house described above, lets look at what has been happening over the years since it was built.

  • The house has had little insulation so large amounts of energy has been flowing though the building envelope.
  • The house has numerous holes and air leaks that result in large heat losses, however the benefit of such high air exchange rate is better, if uncontrolled, indoor air quality. If there is a wood-burning fireplace, these typically allow large amounts of house air to exhaust through the open chimney. Even with “tight-fitting doors or flue dampers, the fireplace chimney is generally a huge energy (and air) loss source for the building.
  • Relative humidity in the house is expected to have been low in the winter, due to the high air exchange rate and high in the summer, for the same reason. This would lead to the house being hard to heat and cool, but also uncomfortable.
  • Windows, in particular in the “wet” rooms such as the bathrooms and the kitchen, were likely subject to condensation on the glass in the winter and the shoulder seasons.

When looking at such a typical existing house the first step is to examine the decisions that need to be made. In this case, let’s pick a traditional war-time, Victory Home which are common in many cities across the country.

Blown opportunity: most older homes have little to no insulation in the wall cavities, an obvious first step to improving energy efficiency.
Blown opportunity: most older homes have little to no insulation in the wall cavities, an obvious first step to improving energy efficiency.

General

The renovator will need to decide on the building science features which need to be addressed.

  • If the drainage is poor, this needs to be fixed, regardless of what the house is made of.
  • The basement floor is uninsulated. This will not be a comfortable floor without insulation. It is unlikely that removing the basement floor, adding insulation, and then re-installing a concrete floor makes sense unless the existing floor is in poor condition. Therefore, insulation can only be added to the top of the floor. This will be limited by the basement ceiling height.
  • New triple-glazed windows will be needed to improve the envelope.
  • The wall thickness will need to be increased to accommodate the increased insulation.
  • The key building science features needed:
    • Weather barrier
    • Rain screen
    • Thermal barrier
    • Air barrier
    • Vapour barrier
Historic victory: across the country, many WWII-era victory homes, originally built as temporary housing for industrial workers, are still standing as permanent but inefficient homes.
Historic victory: across the country, many WWII-era victory homes, originally built as temporary housing for industrial workers, are still standing as permanent but inefficient homes.

Victory Home

This house will be wood-frame. It is unlikely that the exterior of the house is historically significant, and therefore the renovator has options. The insulation can be added to the interior or the exterior of the building. While working on the inside of the home is easier, the Victory Home is a modest size and the owners may be reluctant to reduce their floor area. To accommodate this, the decision may be made to add thickness to the exterior. The method of increasing the thickness of the wall studs will be the most problematic decision. This can be done in a number of ways and an architect should be consulted for a suitable solution. Typically, the frame of the existing house is structurally sufficient enough to allow the extensions to be “hung” from the existing walls. If that decision is made, then several items fall into place.

The weather barrier is the exterior cladding. Unless an air space is incorporated into the cladding by the nature of the cladding itself, it needs to be installed on strapping to provide an air space.

The rain screen is the air space between the cladding and the house wrap or the insulation installed over top of the studs.

The thermal barrier could be selected to do “double-duty” by selecting foam insulation which also has air barrier properties.

The selection of the vapour barrier is required. Keep in mind that vapour diffusion is a relatively weak process for moving moisture and is dependent on the surface area covered. If 90% of the surface is covered, then 90% of the vapour diffusion is prevented. Moving air is the primary transport mechanism for moving moisture. If the air barrier feature is being handled by another material, the vapour barrier can be a vapour retardant paint (if the interior drywall was not removed, the vapour barrier may already be in place with the existing, multiple coats of paint). If the walls were opened, there is an opportunity to install a sheet-type vapour barrier. This can be polyethylene, or it can be one of the materials where the vapour permeance changes with humidity. This will allow any moisture which happens to get into the wall due to poor flashing details or poor window installation to dry.

The ceiling can be sealed by removing the existing ceiling insulation and applying two or three inches of spray foam insulation to provide the air barrier properties. The desired amount of insulation can then be blown in on top of this to provide the thermal barrier function.

The basement walls and rim joist space decisions will generally be based on the type of foundation present. The most likely options are concrete block or poured concrete. Poured concrete is considered an air barrier, while concrete block is not. If poured concrete, spray foam insulation may be the best solution for connecting the air barrier in the walls, the rim joists, and the basement wall. If concrete block was used, an alternative such as airtight drywall, a vapour permeable, air barrier sheet material or spray foam insulation against the concrete block wall. Typically, drainage is poor in these older houses so a mechanism to allow these walls to dry to the inside is preferred. A provision must be made to ensure that the air barrier is connected to the concrete floor as well. How to do this detail will depend on the method chosen to provide the air barrier for the basement wall.

Now, with the house better insulated, with better windows and more airtight, the air conditioning and heating systems will be over-sized. If left as-is, oversizing will lead to short cycling and this may lead to inadequate distribution of heat and cooling in the house. Also be aware that with the improved air tightness, mechanical ventilation will be required to eliminate cooking odours and to control humidity levels. Therefore, the renovation should include an upgrade to the heating and cooling equipment as well as adding a heat recovery ventilator.

Hopefully this example highlights some of the challenges that renovators might expect and demonstrates the role the new CHBA Renovators’ Manual will play in helping renovators with the decisions they will be making to improve the energy efficiency of housing across the country.

Gary Sharp, CHBA

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EnerQuality Housing Innovation Awards announced

EnerQuality Housing Innovation Awards announced

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EnerQuality Housing Innovation Awards announced

Leading companies in sustainable housing recognized for their contributions and advancements in Ontario’s Green Building category

Ontario’s best Green Builders were celebrated at the EnerQuality Awards Gala (EQ Awards) at the Universal Eventspace in Vaughan. Hosted by Breakfast Television’s Kevin Frankish, more than 200 industry peers gathered to share concepts and accolades as together they help to move towards a more energy conscious future.

“Advancing energy-efficient techniques and tools are huge priorities in the building sector to continue to improve healthy living conditions, fight climate change and minimize unnecessary spending,” said Corey McBurney, president of EnerQuality. “The EnerQuality Housing Innovation Forum and Awards help to connect builders with the innovations they need to meet their design goals as well as spotlight the change-makers who are effecting policies and driving standards towards a shared goal of Net Zero housing.”

Among the biggest attractions of the Innovation Forum, which took place during the day, was the keynote from MaRS, Tom Rand, who offered tangible solutions to combat climate change, including his stance on pricing carbon and how sharing a new story of clean energy abundance has the power to engage the public and inspire action.

The highly competitive Innovation Gauntlet rounded out the day before the official award ceremony began, with IBC Technologies Inc. being named the winner for their Newest Innovation – IBC DC Series Dual Condensing Appliance. “The IBC Better Boiler product is a forward thinking, adaptable technology with integration to smart homes. This is a truly unique product and was a clear leader in this year’s submissions,” said Shaun Joffe, executive director of sustainability and building sciences at Great Gulf and judge of the Innovation Gauntlet participants.

The EQ Awards were enjoyed by all and featured special designations to highlight the outstanding contributions of industry leaders.

Larry Brydon, VP business development with Cricket Energy, was the 2017 Hall of Fame nominee. Brydon has been in the HVAC distribution and energy services market for more than 25 years. A past chair of Sustainable Buildings Canada and the Toronto chapter of the Canada Green Building Council, he currently serves on the board of directors for the Canadian Efficiency Alliance, the International Initiative for a Sustainable Built Environment (iiSBE), Sustainable Buildings Canada (SBC) and EnerQuality. Among his many achievements, Brydon led the Enbridge and Union Gas’s Savings by Design program. This initiative has participated in over 200 lowrise, and 50 highrise developer-design charrettes where they shared energy-efficient design alternatives resulting in 15 to 25 per cent energy improvement over the Ontario Building Code.

Doug Tarry of Doug Tarry Custom Homes was named Leader of the Year. It was a banner year Doug Tarry Custom Homes. Fresh off winning the inaugural Net Zero Builder Award from the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, his Project Hope, a fundraising event that was the first time a Net Zero home was built in just three days, raised funds for the family of the late Johnny Nooren, a building inspector from St. Thomas. The project won the 2017 Prestige Award from the Ontario Home Builders’ Association for Project of the Year Lowrise, and the trailer for the accompanying documentary was seen by more than 10,000 in movie theatres in Ontario.

Doug Tarry led his team of builders to receive the 2016 EQ Builder Achievement Award and now holds the 2017 title of Leader of the Year for propelling the company’s holistic Net Zero housing concepts with simple controls designed to allow homeowners to save money while living in a healthy environment.

Arista Homes was awarded the Impact Award, which was introduced in 2016 to recognize a builder’s significant voluntary progress in reducing carbon emission and outstanding achievements through energy efficient and sustainability practices. “Green initiatives and Energy Star participation have become staples of our building practices and we remain committed to continuing to improve our building practices and to lead by example,” said Franco Crispino, VP of sales and marketing. Arista Homes has proudly enrolled more than 1,200 Energy Star homes since the construction of its first multi-phase Energy Star community in 2009.

Other Award Winners

Partner Award: Enbridge Gas Distribution, Union Gas, Owens Corning

Enbridge Savings By Design: Remington Homes

Building Innovation Lowrise: Great Gulf Homes

Building Innovation Mid/Highrise: Times Group

Energy Star for New Homes Builder of the Year (small volume): sean.ca (Sean Mason Homes)

Energy Star for New Homes Builder of the Year (mid volume): Remington Homes

Energy Star for New Homes Builder of the Year (large volume): The Minto Group

Energy Star Champion of the Year: Jacqueline Collier, Tamarack Homes

Best Green Marketing Campaign: Doug Tarry Custom Homes

R-2000 Home Builder of the Year: RND Construction

Net Zero Home Builder of the Year: Reid’s Heritage Homes

Evaluator of the Year: Angela Bustamante, Building Knowledge

Builder Achievement Award: Shaun Joffe, Great Gulf Homes

Ontario Green Builder of the Year: Sifton Properties Ltd.

EnerQuality is Canada’s No. 1 certifier of energy efficient homes and the market leader in delivering award-winning residential green building programs. Founded in 1998 by the Ontario Home Builders’ Association (OHBA) and the Canadian Energy Efficiency Alliance (CEEA), EnerQuality’s mission is to accelerate housing innovation to improve building performance.


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Builder Profile: Lucchetta Homes takes home top awards

Builder Profile: Lucchetta Homes takes home top awards

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Builder Profile: Lucchetta Homes takes home top awards

by Catherine Daley

Number One in Canada

It’s been quite the year for Lucchetta Homes and it’s not even over yet. On May 2nd, they were named Builder of the Year by the Niagara Home Builders’ Association (NHBA) 2017 Awards of Excellence. And on May 12th they received the top award for the Best Community Development of the Year from the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) for their development called the Residences of Hunters Pointe.

Director of sales and marketing, Kim Kopyl, expressed her enthusiasm prior to the CHBA win simply because Lucchetta Homes had been nominated. As a result of a new program, CHBA received a record number of entries for the 39th National Awards for Housing Excellence, and had to pare down thousands of entries to 700. This, alone, was an unexpected victory for Lucchetta. Over a two-week period, 80 judges evaluated all of the entries. “To have been selected as a national finalist was already an immense accomplishment,” said Kopyl.

NHBA Awards: Kim Kopyl (director of sales & marketing); Robert Lucchetta (co-principal); Dora Lucchetta; Brenda Lucchetta, Ed Lucchetta (co-principal).
NHBA Awards: Kim Kopyl (director of sales & marketing); Robert Lucchetta (co-principal); Dora Lucchetta; Brenda Lucchetta, Ed Lucchetta (co-principal).

CHBA Awards: Eric DenOuden (president CHBA); Kim Kopyl (director of sales & marketing); Brenda Lucchetta; Ed Lucchetta (co-principal); Robert Lucchetta (co-principal); Dora Lucchetta; Wendi Pelfri (designer).
CHBA Awards: Eric DenOuden (president CHBA); Kim Kopyl (director of sales & marketing); Brenda Lucchetta; Ed Lucchetta (co-principal); Robert Lucchetta (co-principal); Dora Lucchetta; Wendi Pelfri (designer).

Often referred to as the ‘Oscars’ of housing, 39 awards recognized the best in the industry. With stiff competition from builders across Canada, representatives from Lucchetta Homes made their way to St. John’s, Newfoundland to attend the coveted awards. “We are beyond humbled and ecstatic over our recent accomplishment at the CHBA awards,” said Kopyl. “It’s a tribute to all of our purchasers who entrusted us as their preferred builder.”

The Residences of Hunters Pointe not only captured the imagination of the homeowners who have chosen to live there, but also the judges as well. Resortstyle living is part of the community’s appeal. An impressive 14,000-squarefoot, amenity-filled community centre offers a state-of-the-art gym with a personal trainer, a registered massage therapist, fitness classes, a hot tub, a library and more.

The Residences Of Hunters Pointe, Bristol Model
The Residences Of Hunters Pointe, Bristol Model

Located in the heart of the Niagara Region, The Residences at Hunters Pointe benefit from a truly unique setting, overlooking the Welland Canal. Depending upon the home’s location, residents can relax in their yard and watch ships slowly cruise by, and all can enjoy strolling along the canal hiking trails.

The community is rich with activities and amenities – whether it’s swimming in the saltwater pool, playing tennis, unwinding in the fitness centre, or simply gardening in the backyard, residents have the choice to be as busy as they want to be.

The freehold environment is ideal for snowbirds and staycationers, as homeowners don’t have to worry about security features, cutting the lawn or shovelling the snow.

Ugo Lucchetta started the company more than 50 years ago. Lucchetta Homes quickly became known for their quality construction, craftsmanship and unparalleled customer service. Sons, Robert and Ed Lucchetta, are now at the helm and carry on the traditions started by their father, while upping the ante to be one of the best. Their hard work has paid off. “We are very honoured and proud to be a CHBA National Awards winner, and we sincerely congratulate all nominees and winners from the event.” said Ed Lucchetta. “Our attention to detail, along with our goal to exceed our clients’ expectations, has culminated in a luxury home and a resort-style community, exuding both class and functionality.”

The Residences Of Hunters Pointe
The Residences Of Hunters Pointe

The CHBA distinction is the latest in an impressive collection of awards garnered by Lucchetta Homes. In addition to receiving high, local praise from the NHBA as Builder of the Year, they were also awarded for Most Outstanding Production Home Over 1,800 square feet, Excellence in Green, and Best Website. Lucchetta Homes has also been recognized as the R-2000 Builder of the Year, the Energy Star Builder of the Year, and received national recognition for building Canada’s first Net Zero Ready Qualified Home under the CHBA guidelines.

Lucchetta Homes continually raises the bar. This commitment to excellence is reflected in the high ratings that they receive from Tarion Warranty Corporation, surpassing customer satisfaction levels with astounding referral rates. “Not only do we share this award [Best Community Development of the Year] with the proud owners who call Hunters Point home.” said Rob Lucchetta. “But we are also honoured to share this extraordinary acknowledgment with our tremendously talented team, trades, suppliers and purchasers.”

LucchettaHomes.com


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Subhi Alsayed

Mattamy Homes welcomes new VP sustainable development

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Mattamy Homes welcomes new VP sustainable development

(CNW) — Mattamy Homes, North America’s largest privately owned homebuilder, is pleased to announce that Subhi Alsayed has joined the company as vice president, sustainable development. In this newly created role, Alsayed will be responsible for working with Mattamy’s leadership team and others to investigate and implement strategies that will make the company a leader in this area.

Subhi Alsayed, Mattamy Homes - VP Sustainable Development
Subhi Alsayed, Mattamy Homes – VP Sustainable Development

Alsayed has more than 20 years of experience in Canada and internationally, and is known in the industry as an expert in sustainable, Net Zero, resilient buildings, and as a driver of innovation in technology adoption, marketing strategy and finance models.

“Throughout his career, Subhi has focused on building strong business cases for change, and finding innovative ways of introducing and ‘de-risking’ new methods and technologies,” said Peter Gilgan, founder and CEO of Mattamy Homes. “His extensive technical and business skills and varied background will serve Mattamy well as we embark on an exciting journey to position ourselves as an innovator and industry leader in sustainable development.”

Most recently Alsayed was the innovation manager with Tridel Corporation, one of the largest highrise residential real estate groups in Canada. He was also the director of projects with Tower Labs @ MaRS, Tridel’s non-profit for accelerating the adoption of green-building technologies and practices, where he initiated and led pilot and demonstration projects in highrise buildings. Alsayed also co-founded netZED, net zero energy dwelling, the first branded net zero energy concept in highrise living. Before Tridel, he held a variety of roles with engineering and construction firms in Canada and internationally.

Alsayed is a professional engineer, LEED accredited professional and a certified energy manager. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Jordan and an MBA from the Ivey Business School.

“I am excited to join Mattamy Homes, the North American leader in developing quality homes and communities,” said Alsayed. “What’s unique about this opportunity is it allows me to work under supportive, dedicated leadership with the vision and determination to transform the industry while keeping customers’ best interests at heart.”

Mattamy Homes is the largest privately owned homebuilder in North America, with operations across the United States and Canada. Mattamy has sold more than 75,000 homes in hundreds of communities.

http://mattamyhomes.com/


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