Tag Archives: Neighbourhood Watch

Neighbourhood Watch: Yorkville

Yorkville – High end and priced to match

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Yorkville – High end and priced to match

If location, location, location is the golden rule of real estate, the Yorkville area of Toronto is one of the most shining examples. Indeed, it doesn’t get much more central than this, bounded by Bloor Street, Davenport Road, Yonge Street and Avenue Road. If midtown Toronto is what you want, a neighbourhood pretty much at the intersection of the city’s main subway lines at Yonge and Bloor is it.

Five-star is the perfect descriptor for Yorkville, home to the Mink Mile, one of Canada’s most exclusive shopping districts, along a stretch of Bloor. Upscale names such as Prada, Chanel, Gucci, Boss, Hermes, Louis Vuitton, Holt Renfrew and Harry Rosen operate flagship locations here, and north of Bloor, on Yorkville and Cumberland streets, you’ll find smaller buildings containing art galleries, first-floor retail and high-end restaurants. And of course, being so close to the famous Yonge Street, you’re just steps away from every retail option you can imagine, including the new Nordstrom Rack on the ground floor at 1 Bloor East.

Prized condo destination

As you can imagine, given Toronto’s condo boom, Yorkville is also a prized location for highrise living, with developers introducing several new projects in recent years, reflective of the luxurious character of the area.

“(8 Cumberland) is right on Yonge Street, you can walk to the subway door, it’s right there, and it connects to a path that goes through Yorkville and all the way through to Bloor Street,” Alan Vihant, Great Gulf’s senior vice-president, highrise, told Condo Life last fall at the groundbreaking for the company’s 8 Cumberland. This modern 51-storey condo with a century-old brick Victorian podium is located at the northwest corner of Cumberland Avenue and Yonge.

“8 Cumberland will create a new gateway to the Yorkville District,” says Great Gulf President, Residential, Niall Collins. “Our commitment to the neighbourhood’s revitalization includes a 36-storey condo tower at 18 Yorkville, the iconic 76-storey condo tower at One Bloor East and this 51-storey condo development all within a block radius.”

Award-winning

Nearby, Lanterra Developments is building 50 Scollard, a 41- storey condo at the corner of Bay and Scollard in Yorkville, with 77 exclusive residences. The project, in fact, earned Lanterra Best Highrise Building Design at the 2019 BILD Awards.

Complementing the high end, highrise living and shopping in Yorkville are nearby cultural offerings such as the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art, the Mira Godard Gallery, the Heffel Fine Art Auction House and Gallery 36.

And of course, blessed with a location along major transit arteries, getting to and from Yorkville is a breeze, with three subway stops along this stretch of Bloor.

Location, location, location

Bounded by Bloor Street to the south, Davenport Road to the north, Yonge Street to the east and Avenue Road to the west

Key landmarks

  • Cumberland Terrace
  • Gallery 36
  • Hemingway’s
  • Holt Renfrew Centre
  • Royal Ontario Museum
  • Sassafraz
  • Windsor Arms Hotel

Select condo projects

8 Cumberland by Great Gulf

11 Yorkville by RioCan Living

11 Yorkville by Metropia

11 Yorkville by Capital Developments

50 Scollard by Lanterra Developments

321 Davenport by Alterra Group

625 Yonge Street by Edenshaw Developments


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Neighbourhood Watch: Hamilton

Hamilton is the tech city of the future

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Hamilton is the tech city of the future

Hamilton may be best known as a steel city – a moniker it may never shake, given the industry is still alive and well here. But here’s a more modern nickname for you – tech town.

Yes, really.

The city of 536,917, located at the west end of Lake Ontario in the Niagara Peninsula and along the Niagara Escarpment, was recently ranked as one of the top tech cities in North America for “opportunity.”

Commercial real estate services and investment firm CBRE rated Hamilton number two, citing a tech scene that has grown by 52 per cent over the last five years. This, in addition to naming it Canada’s fastest growing mid-sized city for tech talent in 2018.

“Hamilton’s tech scene is growing rapidly and new spaces, ideas, and collaborations are putting ‘Innovation to Work’ each day,” says Judy Lam, the City’s acting director of economic development. “Requests for brick and beam office space are flooding in to our office and we are working to attract and retain this creative class in Hamilton – which a ranking such as this one will greatly assist in such an endeavour.”

This reputation may be slightly unfamiliar to some, but homebuyers have known the city has been transitioning for years.

City on the highrise

Indeed, a quest for single-detached housing at affordable prices has sent throngs of buyers from the Toronto area to Hamilton over the past decade, ReMax Canada confirmed in a recent report.

While more affordable lowrise homes may have encouraged GTA buyers to head west, it may be the stellar performance of the highrise sector that keeps them here. See, for example, how healthy the price growth in Hamilton is for condos, as compared to that for all housing types.

Developers, meanwhile, are catering to the growing demand for highrise housing in the city. Rosehaven Homes’ KiWi Condos is among the signature projects underway in the city. More are to come, particularly as nearby Burlington is putting the brakes on such development in its downtown area.

It’s not just about homebuying opportunity in Hamilton, however. From educational institutions such as McMaster University and Mohawk College, to exhibits such as the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, to historical landmarks such as Dundurn Castle, there’s plenty to enjoy in and around the city.

City favourites

For sports fans, there’s the city favourite Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League, who play out of the new Tim Hortons Field, as well as the Hamilton Bulldogs of the Ontario Hockey League, playing out of FirstOntario Centre, formerly Copps Coliseum.

Hamilton is also benefiting nicely from the billions being spent on transit and highway infrastructure improvements in the province, allowing residents to live there and easily get around the city or travel into surrounding areas.

All of this further positions Hamilton and its residents to enjoy its rising stature as a tech town, and a place to be now and in the future.

Location, location, location

Located in the Golden Horseshoe at the west end of Lake Ontario; population of 536,917; 68 kms from Toronto, 73 kms to Niagara Falls.

Key landmarks

• Canadian Football Hall of Fame

• Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum

• Dundurn Castle

• FirstOntario Centre

• Hamilton Museum of Steam & Technology

• Tim Hortons Field

Select condo developments

98 James St. Condos by Hue Developments

98 James St. Condos by LCH Developments

CoMo Condos by Homes By DeSantis

Harbour Condos On The Bay by Canlight Group

KiWi Condos by Rosehaven Homes

Odyssey Condos & Towns by Rosehaven Homes

Soho Central Park by Losani Homes


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Neighbourhood Watch: Niagara

In Niagara, the Falls are just part of the appeal

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In Niagara, the Falls are just part of the appeal

When people think Niagara, they often think only of the Falls themselves, those natural wonders to which a visit never seems to grow old.

But beyond the awe-inspiring beauty and power of the Falls and the Niagara River, Niagara Region offers a lot more that’s worthy of just a weekend getaway.

Encompassing towns such as Grimsby, Lincoln, Niagara-on-the-Lake, St. Catharines, Thorold and Welland, the Niagara Region is blessed with a great natural location. It occupies most of the Niagara Peninsula, bounded by the U.S. to the south and on the north by Lake Ontario, and of course the Niagara Escarpment – all of which offers strong potential for business and lifestyle choices.

These natural landscapes and climate make the Niagara Region perfect for agri-business such as winemaking – a key economic sector. The Niagara Wine Route, connecting dozens of wineries, is a growing tourism draw to complement cultural events such as the Shaw Festival.

Indeed, a visit to the area can involve a stop at the Falls, winery tours, the quaint town of Niagara-on-the- Lake, the Botanical Gardens with its Floral Clock and Butterfly Conservatory, several championship golf course and a growing casino industry in downtown Niagara Falls.

But this is all for play. To live and work in the region is another matter.

Economic growth

Again, a blessing of location, Niagara is within 800 km of two provinces, nine states and 130 million people on both sides of the border. This means opportunities for business. The trade that flows across Niagara’s borders totals more than $100 billion annually, and supports hundreds of thousands of jobs across Canada and the U.S. The infrastructure network to support this trade activity comprises five international bridges, multiple railways and the Welland Canal, linking Lake Erie into the St. Lawrence Seaway system.

All of this is conducive to growth potential for the region’s manufacturing and transportation and logistics sectors, to complement the historical strength in agriculture and tourism.

Niagara’s economy has shown steady growth in a number of areas, particularly in job creation and new investment, but still lags slightly behind Ontario averages. The Niagara economic development department confirms the area still has challenges in higher unemployment, lower participation rate and lower household income per capita.

But that’s changing. In 2018 alone, Niagara had $1.7 billion in construction investment. From 2015 to 2018, such investment grew by 56 per cent in Niagara, compared to 19 per cent for Ontario overall.

New home development

As the economy grows and affords people more opportunity to live and work in Niagara – or close by – new-home development is following.

Much of the housing growth is in the lowrise category, as buyers from the GTA find the lot sizes and price points far more appealing and affordable.

According to the latest Royal LePage House Price Survey, aggregate home prices in St. Catharines-Niagara were $418,673 in the second quarter of 2019. This is up 3.2 per cent per cent from the same period last year.

Given the popularity of condominiums as a lifestyle choice, growth in this category is on its way. Homes by DeSantis, for example, has condo projects underway in both Grimsby and Stoney Creek. And Urbane Communities is building Marbella Condominium in Niagara Falls.

Location, location, location

A regional municipality in Southern Ontario comprising 12 municipalities such as Grimsby, Lincoln, Niagara-on-the-Lake, St. Catharines, Thorold and Welland; 130 kms from Toronto; 86 kms from Hamilton.

Key landmarks

  • Botanical Gardens
  • Casino Niagara
  • Clifton Hill
  • Niagara Falls
  • The Niagara Wine Route
  • Welland Canal

Select condo developments

Marbella Condominium by Urbane Communities

Utopia Condominiums by New Horizon Development Group

AquaZul by Homes By DeSantis

Como Condos by Homes By DeSantis


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Etobicoke is development central, literally

Etobicoke is development central, literally

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Etobicoke is development central, literally

In real estate terms, an area in transition is a good thing, since it generally refers to progress, development and things being on the upswing.

Count Etobicoke as just one of those areas.

Really? Etobicoke, that large, narrow north-south swath that stretches from Lake Ontario up to Steeles Ave., and shouldered by Humber River on the east and Etobicoke Creek on the west? With large, well established and affluent neighbourhoods?

Yes, one and the same – the west end locale with the funny name people often mispronounce (FYI the K is silent) – that wasn’t exactly in need of an upgrade.

Blessed with a strong natural location due to its proximity to downtown Toronto, easy access to the QEW and Hwys. 401, 427 and 27, the Bloor subway line and several major TTC and GO Transit hubs, Etobicoke has long been a sought-after residential location.

North Etobicoke, for its easy highway access, plethora of commercial ventures and lower priced real estate. Etobicoke Centre, for its proximity to the Islington-City Centre West central business district, and exclusive neighbourhoods with large, treed properties such as the Kingsway. And South Etobicoke, or Etobicoke Lakeshore, for its prime lakefront location and areas such as Humber Bay and Mystic Pointe.

Do south

But when it comes to new condo development and buying opportunities, it’s all about the south. Well, mostly the south, until very recently.

Etobicoke Lakeshore was the first to transition, with the former motel strip at Lakeshore and Park Lawn giving way over the last several years to dozens of new projects. Today it is one of Toronto’s hottest new condo destinations. Your location here is right on Lake Ontario, with outstanding views of downtown Toronto, along the Martin Goodman Trail for cycling and running, and close to the Gardiner to commute into the city and to the QEW to head west. TTC bus and streetcar service is quite literally at your front door.

Now the condo boom is spreading north, into the central part of Etobicoke with new developments along Dundas St. W. between Islington and the 427, and several more planned for the south side of Dundas just west of Kipling subway. New condos are also springing up along the 427 near Burhamthorpe, appealing to those who prefer highway access over transit.

Under construction

Indeed, in Etobicoke Centre, construction will be the order of the day. For years. Six Points intersection, known locally as “Spaghetti Junction,” is a complicated interchange where Kipling, Bloor and Dundas all intersect. To support future development in the area, the City is spending tens of millions of dollars over the next two years to modernize the road and surrounding infrastructure. Plans include improved pedestrian and cycle access, wider sidewalks, more trees, street furniture and improved access to Kipling subway. The station itself is being expanded into a regional transit hub to link the TTC with GO Transit trains and buses, as well as Mississauga Mi-Way bus lines.

Location, location, location

Bordered on the south by Lake Ontario, on the east by the Humber River, on the west by Etobicoke Creek and Mississauga, and on the north by Steeles Ave. W.; population 365,143.

Key landmarks

• Centennial Park

• Etobicoke Waterfront

• Humber River

• Sherway Gardens

• The Old Mill

Select condo developments

293 The Kingsway by Benvenuto Group

300 The East Mall by KingSett Capital

327 Royal York Rd. by Vandyk Group

689 The Queensway by Parallax Development Corp.

1197 The Queensway by Marlin Spring

Empire Phoenix by Empire Communities

Parkland on Eglinton West by Shannex Inc.

Queensway Park by Urban Capital

Valhalla Town Square by Edilcan Development Corp.

Vita Two on the Lake by Mattamy Homes


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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

And now, literally at the time of writing, the City was hosting a Town Hall on seeking independence from the Region of Peel.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Succession

As for seeking its independence from Peel, Crombie’s office points to the following as motivation:

Population: Mississauga has the population to warrant becoming an independent city similar to other large municipalities such as Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa.

Stability: Mississauga is fiscally strong, has strong resident support and has the necessary capacity and experience to operate as an independent city.

Municipal service: A number of duplications, barriers and complexities in municipal service delivery could be eliminated if Mississauga became an independent city.

Future city building: As an independent City, Mississauga would have full autonomy to focus on City initiatives related to its future growth and development.

Cost: Mississauga pays 60 per cent of the overall property tax levy, yet owns only 29 per cent of regional roads.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to well, Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

More than 288.42 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

• Square One Shopping Centre

• Mississauga Celebration Square

• Living Arts Centre

• Paramount Fine Foods Centre

• University of Toronto Mississauga

• Sheridan College Business School

Select condo projects

Aspire Condominiums by Conservatory Group

Daniels City Centre by The Daniels Corporation

Edge Towers by Solmar Development Corp.

Exchange District by Camrost Felcorp

Pinnacle Grand Park 2 by Pinnacle International

TANU Condos by Edenshaw Developments


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Midtown Toronto

Midtown Toronto – where exactly is that?

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Midtown Toronto – where exactly is that?

Mention the neighbourhood Midtown Toronto, and people generally react in one of two ways. “Where exactly is that?? – the inference being that in a growing city of this size, pinpointing where the centre is, well… difficult, to say the least.

And once realizing “Midtown” is roughly defined by Bloor Street to the south, Eglinton Avenue to the north, Bayview to the east and around Dufferin Street to the west, people often think “Old Toronto.”

And in the context of real estate, that means high-priced.

Increasingly accessible

Indeed, with neighbourhoods such as Rosedale, Forest Hill, Deer Park, Summerhill and Yonge & Eglinton, Midtown is generally affluent and exclusive. Signature detached homes in any of these areas can easily run into the multi-million-dollar range.

However, new developments coming on the scene, particularly some landmark highrise condominiums, are making the area increasingly accessible to a variety of residents.

Once commonly known as “Yonge & Eligible,” due to its popularity among young single professionals, Yonge and Eglinton is quickly becoming one of Toronto’s most desirable neighbourhoods, appealing to a variety of lifestyles.

Boasting five-star restaurants, boutiques, diverse retail services, schools and corporate head offices, residents have plenty of options for work and play right out their front door.

Crosstown traffic

If a great midtown location isn’t enough, proximity to transit is also a significant appeal of this area, being right on the Yonge Street subway line. And come 2021, moving about the city will get even easier, with the expected opening of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.

Slightly off the beaten trail, wander over to nearby Davisville Village, Mount Pleasant Village and Forest Hill Village for a taste of what that Old Toronto was like, still with small, independent shops and nice little parkettes.

Select condo projects

The Eglinton by Menkes Developments

Y&S Condos by Tribute Communities

625 Yonge St. by Edenshaw Developments

e2 Condos by RioCan Living

2128 Yonge St. by Reserve Properties

1 Eglinton East by Davpart Inc.

Line 5 South by Reserve Properties

Location, location, location

Bloor Street to the south, Eglinton Avenue to the north, Bayview Avenue to the east and around Dufferin Street to the west

Key landmarks

  • Yonge Eglinton Centre
  • Casa Loma
  • Spadina Park
  • Forest Hill Village
  • Davisville Village
  • Mount Pleasant Village

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NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH: Markham

Markham: The city has grown up

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Markham: The city has grown up

by Gale Beeby

Housing Options

What was once considered a suburb of Toronto, Markham’s housing options were primarily single-family detached homes, both in new subdivisions and heritage villages. But the city has grown up and is now offering any number of condominium and townhouse developments.

The revitalization of Downtown Markham has been spearheaded by The Remington Group’s multi-use development along Main Street, which includes expansive retail shops, a Marriott Hotel, a Cineplex, as well as a variety of condo buildings and townhomes.

Click here to see a list of condo developments for sale.

Leisure Pursuits

The Markham Museum offers a variety of buildings representing the continued growth of the city, including mills, businesses and family homes. There are 30 buildings on the 25-acre site, including the James Maxwell Log Cabin (1850), the Ninth Line Baptist Church (1848), the Wilson Variety Hall (1875), the Locust Hill Train Station (1936), the Acadian Train Car (1921), the Blacksmith Shop (1862) and the Cider Milll and the Saw Mill.

The Flato Markham Theatre offers over 300 live performances each year, showcasing the wide cultural diversity of the city.

The Varley Art Gallery encompasses the historic Kathleen McKay house (1840), which was the home of Group of Seven member Frederick Horsman Varley for the last 12 years of his life. Now measuring 15,000 square feet, the gallery is the second most popular tourist attraction in York Region.

Parks & Rec

Markham has dozens of parks with baseball diamonds, soccer pitches and children’s play areas and splash pads. The city also boasts over 22 kilometres of scenic pathways with 12 bridges that provide recreational activity for joggers and cyclists.

The largest park in Markham is the Milne Dam Conservation Park. Measuring 305 acres, it is bordered by thick forest on the south and east and the Rouge River runs through the middle. The park is a stop-off point for many migratory birds. Mount Joy Park is over 16 acres and has an outdoor ice skating rink adjacent to a community centre.

Toogood Pond is an 82-acre park that features a partially naturalized pond and marsh. The pond recently underwent revitalization, including sediment removal, restoration of the shoreline and the planting of native trees, shrubs and wildflowers.

Retail Therapy

Downtown Markham offers some of the best shopping in the GTA, with great little restaurants, cafés and boutique stores.

Markville Shopping Centre is currently the largest mall in Markham with over 160 shops and services. But the Pacific Mall – the largest Chinese indoor mall in North America – is a must for anybody looking for a bargain, with over 500 shops and services. It incorporates a traditional Asian-style market with over 450 mini shops selling everything from herbs, Asian fashions, flowers, accessories, cellphones, eyeglasses and computers.

Easy Access

Public transit in Markham is provided by York Region Transit/Viva, which connects with all nine York Region municipalities, as well as connecting with transit services in Toronto and the Region of Peel. GO Transit also serves Markham with train and bus service, taking riders to a variety of locations in the GTA and beyond.

Markham also has easy access to Highways 404 and 407 and the DVP.

BY THE NUMBERS

Walk Score: 47

Population: 329,000

Motto: Leading While Remembering


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NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH: Hamilton

NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH: Hamilton

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NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH: Hamilton

by Gale Beeby

Housing Options

Hamilton is no stranger to historic housing or large estates, but also has a large selection of housing at any price, including an influx of new condominiums. Click here to see a full list of new homes/condos for sale.

Leisure Pursuits

The award-winning Royal Botanical Gardens is a 2,422-acre nature sanctuary considered the plant biodiversity hotspot of Canada. It is also a part of the Niagara Escarpment World Biosphere Reserve. The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum houses over 40 historical aircraft and an extensive aviation gift shop and gallery.

Also located in Hamilton is the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, the Hamilton Military Museum, the Museum of Steam and Technology, and the Whitehern Historic House and Gardens. Dundurn Castle is an 18,000-square-foot neoclassical mansion that was completed in 1835 by architect Robert Charles Wetherell.

Hamilton is also home to the Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League and the Bulldogs of the Ontario Hockey League; their main rivals are the Toronto Marlies.

Parks & Rec

If you are an active hiker, this is the area for you. The Bruce Trail, Canada’s oldest and longest marked footpath and a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, runs 890 kilometres along the Escarpment from Tobermory in the north to Niagara in the south. The section of the trail from Milton to Grimsby runs along the ancient shoreline of Lake Iroquois.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority operates several parks, including Westfield Heritage Village, Dundas Valley (home to the Hermitage Ruins), Fifty Point on Lake Ontario, Spencer Gorge/ Webster’s Falls, Christie Lake, Confederation Park, Eramosa Karst (filled with underground caves and streams) and Valens Lake campground.

Retail Therapy

Hamilton has a lively downtown with a large selection of boutiques, restaurants, cafés and salons. Jackson Square is Hamilton’s largest downtown shopping mall, which is also connected to FirstOntario Centre (formerly Copps Coliseum). The City Centre Mall and Lime Ridge Mall, Hamilton’s largest shopping destination with over 200 shops and services, round out the large shopping districts. And, of course, big box outlets are handily located.

Easy Access

Transit is a viable option in Hamilton. The HSR (Hamilton Street Railway) runs throughout the city and connects with Burlington. Its name is a legacy of the days when most of public transit vehicles were streetcars. The area is served well by highways, including the QEW and Highways 403, 6, 8 and 20, the Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway and the Red Hill Valley Parkway, making commutes into the Niagara Region or the GTA simple. GO Transit also goes in and out of Hamilton daily.

BY THE NUMBERS

Population: 537,000

Known as: The Waterfall Capital of the World

WALK SCORES

Westdale Hamilton: 90

West Hamilton: 88

Dundas: 83

Hamilton Mountain: 82

Ancaster: 75

Upper Wentworth: 73

Stoney Creek Downtown: 75

Hamilton.ca


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