Tag Archives: healthy lifestyle

Boost your immune system through exercise

Boost your immune system through exercise

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Boost your immune system through exercise

We are living in a new world where terms such as social distancing, lockdown, shelter in place and flattening the curve are all part of our lexicon. COVID-19 is global, effecting all races, socioeconomic status and mostly all ages. However, the aging population is at higher risk for developing serious complications.

Photo: bigstockphoto.com
Photo: bigstockphoto.com

Your first line of defense

The immune system is an intricate response system that even science is continually studying, as it is not fully understood. Your first line of defense is to follow a healthy lifestyle.

  • Do not smoke
  • Diet high in fruits and vegetables
  • Exercise regularly
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you drink alcohol, drink in moderation
  • Get adequate sleep
  • Wash hands frequently
  • Minimize stress

We are living in a stressful time where many of our most common de-stressors have been removed – time with family and community, traditional forms of exercise and spiritual venues. Stay connected through technology or your phone. Schedule regular calls or video chats with loved ones. If you are struggling with anxiety or depression, please go to camh.ca for great advice and resources.

Current challenges at the time of writing are that gyms and some outdoor spaces are closed. Even when they reopen, some of us may be understandably nervous to go back to the social life we lived before.

The benefits of exercise

One of the best ways to combat stress is through exercise, as it:

  • Lowers your body’s stress hormones and blood pressure
  • Improves sleep quality, mood, and feelings of well being
  • Increases strength to perform tasks of daily life, thereby increasing confidence and safety
  • Studies support increasing circulation through exercise the immune system functions more readily

When exercising at home, motivation is a challenge:

  • Set a schedule, same time every day
  • List your goals and follow up
  • Have a workout calendar
  • Play upbeat music, no TV
  • Vary between cardiovascular and resistance training
  • Download an app specifically for a mature population or explore YouTube for follow-along videos such as Pocket Yoga, Pilates-Lumowell, Tai Chi for Seniors or Workout Trainer.

Exercise routine

All exercises should be reviewed online for proper form. Never start a new workout routine against your doctor’s advice.

DAY ONE: Cardiovascular focus (go at a pace that gets the heart rate up but allows for you to speak): 20 repetitions x 4 cycles through:

  • Alternating side reaches with squat between
  • Alternating knee to elbow
  • Squat floor-to-ceiling reach
  • High knee standing march
  • Air boxing

DAY TWO: Resistance training focus: Series of the following, 8 to 12 repetitions x 4 cycles

  • Chair squat
  • Wall pushup or floor knee pushup
  • Crunches (not full sit up)
  • Lying hip bridges
  • Side plank
  • Bird dogs
Agnes Ramsay is a Registered Nurse, Personal Trainer and Wellness Coach who specializes in Electric Muscle Stimulation Training.

agnes.ramsay@xbodyworld.com


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Ban food and drink ads to fight childhood obesity, report suggests

Ban food and drink ads to fight childhood obesity, report suggests

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Ban food and drink ads to fight childhood obesity, report suggests

Toronto Star

In an effort to combat the rising tide of childhood obesity and promote healthier eating, the Heart and Stroke Foundation is calling on the federal government to pass legislation restricting food and beverage marketing to children.

“Given experts’ prediction that today’s children may be the first generation to have poorer health and shorter lifespans than their parents, we need to be bold,” writes Diego Marchese, interim CEO and executive vice president of Heart and Stroke, in the 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians released Wednesday.

https://www.thestar.com/life/health_wellness/2017/02/01/ban-food-and-drink-ads-to-fight-childhood-obesity-report-suggests.html


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Body & Soul: House Calls - Aging in Place

Aging in Place

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Aging in Place

Photography: (interior) courtesy of Evergreen Retirement Community; (bottom) bigstockphoto.com

HOUSE CALLS – Where experts answer questions on beauty, health and wellness.

In this issue, Barbara Perinot, RPN and General Manager of Evergreen Retirement Community (verveseniorliving.com), discusses…

Aging in Place

Q – I am an active sixty-eight-year-old woman and my husband, seventy-two, has just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. We have decided to sell our house and move to a retirement residence that will give me the independence that I need, and the assistance that my husband might require in the future. Do you have any suggestions as to what to look for?


A – When searching for your future home in a retirement living community, it’s important that the home tries to incorporate your personal, spiritual, physical, social, intellectual and emotional needs through their daily programming.

A retirement home should allow you to live in a comfortable home environment, while enjoying its various amenities and services. A supportive life enrichment program will keep you as busy as you choose to be, while maintaining your independence.

The key to a healthy lifestyle

Quality food is important to a healthy lifestyle, as good food triggers positive memories that are associated with happiness and social interaction. When choosing a retirement home, it’s important to sample the food from the menu.

Aging in place

Supportive care options are very important, and will allow you the freedom to know that your loved one is cared for within the retirement home while you participate in quality programs inside, and outside, of the community. A retirement home that has the option of an assisted living floor will allow for an easier transition when medical, or cognitive, needs change. Aging in place is what retirement homes should strive for, and it’s imperative that wellness initiatives focus on keeping the mind stimulated and engaged.

Healthy mind and body

Physical programs promote a healthy mind and body. Move long and live strong – there’s much to be said for being as active as possible for as long as possible. Physical programs should be able to accommodate people of all abilities and provide a variety of focused programs.

Email questions or concerns for our beauty, health and wellness specialists to jayne@homesmag.com


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