Tag Archives: GTA

Lindvest

Lindvest is doing it differently across the GTA

Latest News


Lindvest is doing it differently across the GTA

Take a minute to look through the advertising and marketing material of new home developments. How many have similar messaging, look and feel? Happy families, renderings of new homes, beautifully written taglines that use different variations of words such as “life” and “build.” What stands out to you? Probably nothing in particular. The homebuilding industry has a set of norms that companies very rarely step outside of.

At Lindvest, they have seen an opportunity arise out of all of the similarity – the opportunity to stand out, to emerge from the confines of the status quo and do something… different. With more than six decades of building experience, Lindvest’s aim has always been to remain as unique as the customers it serves. This trend will continue with the launch the new marketing campaign in early September.

Do it Differently. This new message, simple and yet provocative, will be seen across billboards, televisions and digital platforms throughout the GTA. This message will weave its way into the Lindvest branding, website, social media platforms and more. The goal is for the voice of Lindvest to stand out from the pack by breaking away from the standards of marketing in the industry. The public will encounter a tone that is as energetic, vibrant and charismatic as the people whose attention it is intended to capture. The imagery will focus on the bold personalities of the customers the company works and interacts with on a daily basis. Gone are the days of the message of blending in, sinking into the sea of similarity.

Do it Differently isn’t performative; it’s prescriptive. Lindvest doesn’t want to claim it’s different just for the sake of being different, but because the company knows that there are people out there who aspire to carve out their own unique path in life. The builder wants to provide a homebuying experience that is as unique and special as it should be. It’s about more than attempting to outperform competitors – the real goal is for the company to better itself. The message that lies deep within the core of this campaign will act as a driving force as Lindvest continues to push to provide a better overall experience for its customers. The message of Do it Differently won’t only represent the campaign and branding, but the company itself. It will become the golden thread that connects every aspect of Lindvest, from advertising to every member of its dedicated and enthusiastic team. This is a company that wants its customers to see and feel that everything is done with pride, consistency and energy – but above all – that Lindvest is doing it differently.

LINDVEST

You can get a sneak peek by visiting the website. Don’t forget to keep your eyes peeled for something different in September.


SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_aug19_condo_market_fi

Condo investor checklist : Location, amenities and low maintenance

Latest News


Condo investor checklist : Location, amenities and low maintenance

Successful condo investors know that there are a number of key considerations to keep in mind when selecting a property that will reap them a solid return on their investment.

Here is a rundown of what investors should be focusing on in their search for a profitable rental property.

Photo courtesy Activa

Affordability

In the GTA’s increasingly expensive housing market, affordability tops the list of considerations for investors. A condo unit should be purchased at a price you can afford to carry, and you’ll need to consider condo fees and property taxes alongside sale price.

Also keep in mind the costs of routine upkeep for the property, particularly as you begin renting it out, and the potential for damage rises (hopefully it’s minor.) Speaking of damage, you will need to cover the cost of insurance for the condo unit; this is required by condo corporations.

Make sure you’re doing a cost benefit analysis of all of this to be certain that the rental income you get not only covers your carrying costs but also provides a bit of profit on top. The goal is to be cash flow positive, but it might take a year or two to get there.

Low-maintenance

Be mindful of a property that will require maintenance outside the routine needs, such as lawn mowing or snow shovelling. Buildings with swimming pools, for example, will have higher maintenance and common element fees down the line, which will cut into the rental income potential for the investor.

Room to grow

Space is a key consideration, especially with more families looking to live in condo properties versus actual houses, which are getting out of most people’s price range — buyers and renters alike. Two-bedroom, two-bathroom rental units with parking and storage will see greater demand from tenants who are willing to pay higher rental rates in order to have more room. If buying close to university or college, larger units can accommodate more residents, which helps students share the monthly rent.

Location

The essential element in the assessment of any condo property’s potential. The condo will have much greater value as a rental unit if it is close to transit, universities and colleges, and retail offerings. It should be noted that many new condo developments — such as the Regent Park revitalization in Toronto — are helping to reshape communities for the better. And the value of condo units in these areas is seeing significant growth as a result.

Jobs

Nearby employment opportunities should be a key consideration when assessing whether a condo unit will carry greater value as a rental property, such as locations that are close to work nodes. Basically anything in downtown Toronto, where much of the younger talent is flocking nowadays, will generate a stronger rental income.

Amenities

Amenities are definite value-add when it comes to rental properties. Gyms, party rooms with catering kitchens, front desk/ concierge service, bike parking and storage — all of these will translate into higher rental rates. The same is true for community amenities. A building will see far more renter interest if it’s close to parks, trails and libraries, with a variety of nearby shopping, dining and entertainment options. And that increased demand will mean more rental dollars.

DEBBIE COSIC, CEO and founder of In2ition Realty, has worked in all facets of the real estate industry for more than 25 years.

In2ition.ca

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_aug19_industry_report_fi

Lessons from Tokyo

Latest News


Lessons from Tokyo

Exploring how other cities and countries approach housing, planning and development can often provide us with insight to enable us to better meet the housing needs of the residents of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). In early June, a Building and Land Development Association (BILD) delegation visited Tokyo and came away with quite a few impressions.

The population of the city of Tokyo is just shy of 10 million people and the population of the Greater Tokyo Area is approximately 38 million with a population density of 6,158 people per sq. km. This would be compared to Toronto’s three million and the GTA’s 6.4 million with a population density of 4,457 people per sq. km. So, while we have challenges in the GTA you can you can well imagine the magnitude of the task of housing, moving and providing places to work, shop and play for 38 million residents.

One of the first impressions of Tokyo is the transportation infrastructure. It is simply humbling to behold. Thirteen subway lines carry 8.7 million riders daily, by elevated trains and mono-rails, an integrated commuter rail system that fans out from multiple stations to all corners of the region and tripled stacked highways that snake through the heart of the city and bypass sensitive areas with tunnels. It’s enough to leave the average Ontarian with infrastructure envy. Tokyo makes it work. Their transportation system is efficient and it’s amazing.

The second impression is the typical built form for housing. There is literally housing that we refer to as missing middle in the GTA, everywhere in Tokyo. Midrise apartment buildings are the dominant housing type; the average building is about eight stories high and is spread throughout the neighbourhoods and regions of Tokyo. In the GTA, we refer to this type of housing as the “missing middle” because of the almost total absence of this type of housing that includes stacked townhomes and midrise buildings. The key feature of this type of housing is its ability to provide gentle density and increased housing supply when land is at a premium.

The third lesson is how transportation infrastructure and housing work together seamlessly. Homes are built near transit stations that form hubs around neighbourhoods. Everything is within walking distance of rapid transit of one form or another and balances the impact of the movement of people between automobiles and public transportation. While traffic congestion occurs, it’s nowhere near what we experience across the GTA on a daily basis.

Lastly, is the approach of the Japanese toward land use and built forms. At the risk of gross oversimplification, land use is flexed to requirements and when needs change so too do the buildings, torn down and rebuilt to accommodate a differing or changing need. It means there is change in housing stock, urban renewal and the concept of a “stable neighbourhood” like we have in Toronto doesn’t generally exist.

There are many lessons to take from Tokyo, and as our region’s population grows by almost 40 per cent through 2041, these lessons should be kept in mind as the GTA plans to house these people in the future.

DAVE WILKES is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

bild.ca

SHARE  

Featured Products


Del Condominium Rentals

In Conversation With… Shanker Narayanan, General Manager, Del Condominium Rentals

Latest News


In Conversation With… Shanker Narayanan, General Manager, Del Condominium Rentals

Shanker Narayanan, general manager, Del Condominium Rentals
Shanker Narayanan, General Manager, Del Condominium Rentals

Condominiums are booming in the GTA, with an increasing number of owners choosing to rent out their units for investment purposes.

Del Condominium Rentals, setting a standard in suite rental management in the GTA since 1986, offers such owners suite leasing services without having to worry about the day-to-day concerns related to being a landlord. From marketing, tenant screening, leasing, maintenance and repair, accounting, insurance coverage, compliance enforcement and revenue retrieval, the company does it all.

We spoke to Shanker Narayanan, general manager of Del Condominium Rentals to learn a little more about this growing business.

Condo Life: What is the scope of the management services you offer to condo unit owners? Is it a one-size fits all package, or is there a range of services owners can choose from…?

Shanker Narayanan: We provide day-to-day management of the suites, including complete research and marketing for new owners, arranging insurance, utility transfers and other services – all for a fee of six per cent of the monthly rental. We plan to also introduce a tiered system involving additional services, such as rent guarantee, suite inspections and maintenance.

Del Condominium Rentals

CL: How much of a growing business category is this for Tridel? We’re hearing so much about the investor element in condominium ownership these days…

SN: We have 2,550 condos in our portfolio today and are planning to grow to 3,500 by 2024. We were primarily a company that provides leasing services for Tridel suite owners, and about 78 per cent of our business comes from their new builds. We have evolved over the past five years into a leading condo rental management company in the GTA. We are aggressively trying to grow the non-Tridel portfolio. If this happens, we would look at increasing the overall portfolio to hopefully 5,000 suites in five years.

For Tridel new builds, we provide lease-up services from interim occupancy to eventual unit registration. This period might vary from building to building. We are currently leasing about 35 to 40 per cent of the inventory in all new builds.

CL: What is your typical client profile? Investor-owners who want to be completely hands off? First-time investors who really need the help being a landlord…?

SN: About 90 per cent of our owners are first-time homeowners or single unit owners, who don’t have the time to self-manage their units. We do have a lot of seasoned investors who have multiple suites in their portfolio. On average, a homeowner stays in our program for five years. They usually have an investment cycle that culminates in either them selling, -self-occupying or in rare cases self-managing the unit.

Del Condominium Rentals

CL: What are the main benefits of using your services, that perhaps suite owners couldn’t do on their own?

SN: Most owners don’t know that there are a million things that could go wrong when managing a condo unit. We know this from experience and from managing a portfolio of more than 2,500 condos over the past decade. Most owners who self-manage condos have a belief that “this won’t happen to me.” Things get complicated at times, and that’s when expert knowledge comes handy. For example, an owner might have a new condo but there might be a water leak from a unit above and that causes water damage in suites below. There could be resulting claims from owners against this owner even though the problem isn’t with their unit. We manage these complex scenarios with the insurance adjusters and the condo property management.

We are a one-stop shop for homeowners, providing turnkey management and peace of mind.

CL: How do you arrive at the end cost to clients for these services? Does it depend on the unit size, rental rate, specific services they’re using…?

SN: Our management fees are very competitive. We have always been a market leader and have been looked upon as setting the benchmark. We also have preferred rates with vendors for services such as plumbing, electrical, HVAC and handyman work. In addition, we co-ordinate works for window coverings, flooring and window and door installation. We have synergies with Tridel and ensure that we pass on the benefits to suite owners.

CL: And how do you determine the rental rate for units?

SN: We do a thorough market evaluation. We are the rental experts, and as such, Tridel sets the rental benchmark for any community. Our expert team looks at trends on MLS and third-party Internet sites and comes up with the best practices to research and tabulate rentals.

CL: Ideally, suite owners would want to be cash-flow positive when renting out their investment condo. How do you help them achieve this goal?

Del Condominium Rentals

SN: Most suite owners have a set financial cycle that will allow them to realize market potential. We save them costs and the hassles of day-to-day management and they see the benefits over a period of time. While cash flow is key for many owners, they see the merit of us ensuring that the unit is well maintained and the equity grows over time.

CL: And when it comes time that they wanted to sell, how can you assist in that transaction, say, to another potential investor-owner?

SN: We typically refer owners back to their agent when they consider selling. This is our partnership with our realtor colleagues. We do, however, ensure the transaction and unit transition go smoothly. For example, we make sure all necessary restorations are completed and that things are co-ordinated with residents and property management.

CL: Any other key pieces of information potential clients should know about your services?

SN: We are leaders in the rental business. What sets us apart from others is that we are part of Tridel. We bring synergies from other group companies such as Del Property Management, DelSuites, Tridel Customer Care and Deltera (construction). This is invaluable and often beneficial for homeowners.

For more information, contact Del Condominium Rentals at the website, 4800 Dufferin St., Toronto, or call 416.296.RENT (7368).

 

 

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_jun19_insider_report_fi

TCS Marketing Systems

Latest News


TCS Marketing Systems

With decades of experience, the people behind this company provide keen insights

In the fast-changing Toronto area real estate market, the team at TCS Marketing Systems always has their fingers on the pulse. The people behind this innovative sales and marketing consulting agency excel at anticipating coming trends, due to their three decades of experience, keen insight and extensive market data.

TCS Marketing Systems has been involved in numerous projects across the GTA and Ontario, including mid- and high-rise condos, townhomes, single-detached homes and master-planned communities. The company has a single guiding principle – integrity – and has set itself apart by being the first consultants in and last out on every project.

Mark Cohen (centre back row) and his TCS Marketing Systems management team.

Wealth of experience

Managing partner of TCSMS is Mark Cohen, a highly respected and well known expert in the industry. His wealth of experience includes key roles with powerhouse developers, including Bramalea Ltd., Menkes Developments, Concord Adex and Tribute Communities. Throughout his career, Cohen has pioneered many of the sales and marketing strategies that are now common in today’s marketplace and is always on the lookout for the next breakthrough.

“When Mark is in the room with the architects, he thinks about what people do after they come home and throw their keys on the table,” says Onkar Dhillon, vice-president of operations and one of The Condo Store’s founding members. “He thinks about how they live. We are designing with consumers in mind. For example, Amazon delivery is the way people get parcels, so we’re adding automated parcel delivery rooms. That’s the kind of thoughtfulness required in design.”

Dhillon has been working with Cohen for 20 years, since they met when Cohen was vice-president of sales and marketing for Concord Adex’s Cityplace, the largest residential highrise development in Toronto history.

Better projects, better designs

Condos used to be subordinate to lowrise homes, Dhillon says, but condos are a lifestyle choice and the challenge is to create better projects and design better spaces to serve consumers.

“Our philosophy is there is a condo for every person, and there’s a purchaser for every condo,” says Glen Buttigieg, vice-president of sales. “We make a case for every condo, whether it’s to take in the morning sun, to see the lake, or the advantage of being near the rooftop terrace. We painstakingly comb over every suite, trying to find the advantage and tailor it for each buyer. Our agents are listening to buyers and determining what suite would serve them best.”

For TCSMS’s developer clients, Cohen and company get in early, sitting in on all of a project’s marketing and design meetings and then create a rationale. They continue working with the same care and commitment until the last unit is sold, understanding the importance of making the projects profitable for their clients.

“What I influence is the design, marketing, sales and customer relationships for different projects,” says Cohen. “Instead of working on 12 projects for one person like I used to, I work on 12 for 12 different builders.”

Bungalow on Mercer Street in downtown Toronto.

TCSMS is equally well-versed in selling and marketing high-, mid-, and lowrise developments. Buyers’ expectations are changing. Due to constraints on land available for building and affordability, people are realizing they don’t have to aspire to 4,500-sq.-ft. houses in rural settings and can live well in smaller homes.

“The market doesn’t want space for space’s sake,” adds Serena Quaglia, vice-president of marketing. “People want common space, a study nook… that’s the challenge for the lowrise market. It’s not going anywhere, but the designs are not what they used to be.”

Quaglia brings more than a decade’s experience in the design, marketing and sales of master-planned communities and believes today’s buyers are more sophisticated and knowledgeable when it comes to evaluating properties. “The most important role we play when working with developers is our ability to accurately represent the needs and desires of each and every buyer. And that starts with being great listeners.”

Altered approach

For example, Bungalow is an ultraluxury condo project by Kalovida Canada Inc. in the heart of the Entertainment and Financial Districts, with just 13 units, just one per floor. Cohen recognized that buyers spending $2.5 million for a suite – hedge fund managers, athletes, entertainment industry types – would likely not be using them as primary residences, but as places to entertain and relax when they were in town. This type of clientele wants a certain type of wine cellar, concierge and modest, rather than overthe- top luxury.

In another example, construction is starting soon at 293 The Kingsway, a luxury condominium by the Benvenuto Group. The Kingsway is a classic Toronto neighbourhood with lush, green streets and good schools, and 293 reflects the prestigious area, with large units, a park-like setting and stylish contemporary design.

And for Wycliffe Homes’ Promenade luxury townhouse development in Thornhill, TCSMS largely focused marketing around the developer, wellknown for its white-glove treatment, first-class finishes, exceptional locations and the opportunity it gives buyers to customize. Staying true to the prestigious Thornhill neighbourhood, Promenade’s townhomes are classy and tasteful, with top-notch features and finishes.

Whether it’s dealing with super luxury projects or condos geared to first-time buyers or investors, TCS Marketing Systems brings the same level of dedication to each one and works until the last unit is sold.

“Real estate is one service that hasn’t been greatly altered by technology,” says Cohen. “Homes are still sold by people, not machines. The quality of renderings is better, the ways to communicate more extensive, but at the end of the day, whether you are selling something to a client or to a customer or pushing a consultant to do something, most of it involves eye-to-eye contact. People move people to move mountains, and that hasn’t changed.”

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_jun19_icw_fi

In Conversation With… Benjamin Bakst, CEO, Marlin Spring

Latest News


In Conversation With… Benjamin Bakst, CEO, Marlin Spring

Creative and innovative housing is the order of the day in the GTA these days, with land availability, housing supply and affordability all an increasing focus for industry and consumers. For developers, this means making the most of prized locations, and bringing forward-thinking and imaginative housing options to market. Marlin Spring, with a portfolio of low- and midrise and mixed-use projects in west end Toronto, Oshawa and other locales, is one such company. CEO and Co-Principal Benjamin Bakst explains.

HOMES Magazine: How are things progressing at your Symphony Towns in Oshawa these days?

Benjamin Bakst: Our team has developed a fantastic relationship with City staff and our neighbours. The plans were created with much of their feedback and we are thankful beneficiaries of that input. What started with the concept of a blank canvas populated with townhomes has now become a plan for a vibrant, unique parkside village. Our sales and marketing teams felt the name Symphony would express more than just a tie-in to Harmony Drive; it would also give the feel of a development that blends well into the neighbourhood while maintaining its individuality.

We’ll be revealing more about the project in the coming weeks with sales starting very soon.

HM: The city received some challenging news last year, with the planned closure of the GM assembly plant. What new opportunities does the city have to grow beyond this long-time focus?

BB: We aim to look forward and assess opportunity, and the City of Oshawa has long been focused on diversifying its economy and providing knowledge-based employment training and options. Manufacturing may have been the centre of all things Oshawa in the past and in the minds of those not living there, but what’s really happening is growth in many sectors, including health, educational services and other emerging areas which now represent more than a quarter of Oshawa’s total employment base – and growing. GM was great, Oshawa is greater.

HM: What are some of the things about Oshawa, and about Symphony specifically, that will contribute to the city’s continued reshaping?

BB: Symphony is taking a piece of Oshawa that is near and dear to a lot of residents’ hearts. It sits on the site of an old school, Dr. F.J. Donevan Collegiate Institute, that was there for many years. We’re building well thought-out prairie-modern style townhomes that complement the existing homes as well as speak to current trends in exterior materials and colours. We’re also creating a big open park which will be gifted to the city for everyone to enjoy. This unique feature will be visible from Taylor Rd. and sure to be enjoyed by our homeowners as well as the broader community.

HM: The Stockyards District Residences in Toronto’s west end is another exciting project you have on the go. How is it progressing?

BB: The Stockyards District Residences is one of my favourite projects at the moment, and our team is working diligently toward the start of construction this summer, as sales have proceeded extremely well. It’s an exciting project for us in a fantastic neighbourhood full of hidden gems. The more I learn about it and get feedback from our clients, the more excited I am to see the finished product. Not long ago, some didn’t understand the vision. No one questions it now.

HM: That area is really on the upswing, with lots of new commercial and residential development connecting with local history. How do you see the neighbourhood progressing or changing in the foreseeable future?

BB: There’s a lot on the horizon in this area. The upcoming closure of the space currently occupied by Maple Leaf Foods and a number of other developments (including another one yet to be announced by Marlin Spring, just east of the Stockyards District Residences) over the next while will mean significant population increase and a continued growth and vibrancy to the existing streetscape and retail along the St. Clair West corridor. Another fascinating phenomenon is the transformation of older buildings in the area. The Symes Event Space and Rainhard are great examples – that building was originally a Toronto waste incinerator – fast forward to today, and it perfectly demonstrates the potential in this city. Both our partners and clients entrust and rely on us to always be looking forward.

HM: How do the Stockyards District Residences reflect the history of the area? Are there any specific design elements, for example, that speak to the Stockyards heritage?

BB: Our joint development and marketing teams, along with the award-winning team at Graziani & Corazza Architects, did an amazing job utilizing the industrial aesthetic of the area as inspiration for the architectural elements of the building. It carries a lot of (expensive) brick and black metal on the exterior, and has very interesting step backs and shape that not only give the building character, but also allowed us to design a lot of unique suites. Many of our owners will have a one-of-a-kind suite, which we are thrilled to be able to offer.

HM: Affordability is a key challenge for housing in the GTA these days. What is Marlin Spring doing to address the issue – in either of these projects or elsewhere?

BB: Our multi-family residential property division is intently focused on this need, and to this end have purchased and currently asset-manage many thousands of apartments across Canada and the US. We see this as one of the greatest challenges facing our city, and have prioritized purchasing units in the GTA, investing time, effort and resources into these buildings to bring them up to 2019 standards and beyond. This generally allows us to maintain lower rental rates than purpose-built rentals. In addition, on our development side, we have multiple projects within which we are building affordable homes. These include our Canvas Condominium project, currently under construction, as well as our Lakeshore project, which is in the development stage.

HM: What’s next for Marlin Spring?

BB: What I am most excited about at the moment, is the upcoming formal launch of our Marlin Spring Foundation. I cannot share details at the moment, but our internal team is aware of our plans and is so supportive and excited!

marlinspring.com

Portfolio

  • Canvas Condominiums Danforth Ave. and Woodbine Ave. Under construction
  • Citron Towns in Richmond Hill Leslie St. and 19th Ave. Registrations only
  • Stockyard District Residences St. Clair Ave. W. and Jane St. Now selling
  • Symphony Parkside Towns in Oshawa Taylor Rd. and Harmony Rd. S. Registrations only
  • The Mack, Parkside Towns Major Mackenzie Dr. W. and Hwy. 400, Vaughan Final release
  • WestBeach Queen St. E. and Coxwell Ave. Under construction

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_jun19_real_insight_fi

Condos continue to provide affordable option for new-home buyers

Latest News


Condos continue to provide affordable option for new-home buyers

Greater Toronto Area realtors reported 4,731 condominium apartment sales through TREB’s MLS System in the first quarter of 2019. This means results were down by 6.8 per cent compared to Q1 of 2018.

As for new condominium apartment, listings were up by 2.4 per cent compared to Q1 2018, with 8,222 listings added in 2019 versus 8,029 listings added in the first three months of 2018.

I’d like to say that while we experienced a slightly better-supplied condo market in the first quarter of 2019, the market segment remained tight enough to retain the highest year-over-year rate of price growth compared to other major home types. Condos continue to provide prospective buyers with a relatively affordable housing option in the GTA, especially given the impact of the OSFI-mandated mortgage stress test.

The average price of a condominium apartment increased by 4.5 per cent from $533,520 in Q1 2018 to $557,377 in Q1 2019. Year-over-year price growth in the city of Toronto, which accounted for 69 per cent of transactions, was slightly higher at 5.4 per cent, resulting in an average price of $603,243.

The completion of new condominium apartment projects can certainly influence both the ownership and rental segments when it comes to the condo market. According to CMHC, condo apartment completions were up substantially year-over-year in the fourth quarter of 2018, which could account for an uptick in condo ownership and rental listings in Q1 2019. Conversely, condo apartment completions were down year-over-year in Q1 2019, which could arguably impact listings in the opposite manner over the next three months.

The condominium apartment rental market remained very tight through the first three months of 2019. Average one- and two-bedroom rents were up well above the rate of inflation on a year-over-year basis in the first quarter. However, the condo rental market also benefited from an increase in the number of units listed, resulting in more choice for prospective renters. However, we would need to see a number of quarters with listings growth outstripping rental transaction growth in order for the market to become more balanced.

As a consumer, it’s easy to stay up to date about the GTA real estate market by following us on social, or if you want to search GTA Listings, updated in real time, visit trebhome.com.

Garry Bhaura is president of the Toronto Real Estate Board, a professional association that represents 48,000 professional realtor members in the Greater Toronto Area. You can contact him At Trebpres@trebnet.com. For updates on the real estate market, visit Trebhome.com. If commercial property is what interests you, contact a TREB realtor by visiting trebcommercial.com.

SHARE  

Featured Products


CL June 19 News BILD

GTA new home market shows encouraging signs in March

Latest News


GTA new home market shows encouraging signs in March

CL June 19 News BILD

The GTA new home market continued to show some encouraging signs in March, according to the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

Total new home sales, with 2,314 new homes sold, were up 20 per cent from last year, though still 36 per cent below the 10-year average, according to Altus Group, BILD’s official source for new home market intelligence. There were 886 new single-family homes sold in March, including detached, linked and semi-detached houses and townhouses, up from last March’s low of 295, but still 38 per cent below the 10-year average. This is the fifth month in a row that new single-family home sales have increased year-over-year.Sales of new condominium units in low-, medium- and highrise buildings, stacked townhouses and loft units, with 1,428 units sold, were down 13 per cent from March 2018 and 34 per cent below the 10-year average.

Broader availability

“The desire to own a new single-family home never went away, but many would-be buyers have been taking a wait-and-see approach in the past two years,” says Patricia Arsenault, Altus Group’s executive vice-president, Data Solutions. “While the affordability of single-family homes in general remains a challenge, the broader range of product at more favourable price points that is starting to emerge has attracted some of these buyers into the market.”

The benchmark prices of both single-family homes and condominium apartments moderated slightly compared to the previous month. The benchmark price of new single-family homes was $1.12 million, down 7.6 per cent over the last 12 months, while the benchmark price of new condominium units was $780,839, up 5.1 per cent over the last 12 months.

Affordability still an issue

“Despite the recent slight moderation in new home prices, affordability is an issue for many people in the GTA, as we have learned from our Building Answers campaign, which encourages residents to ask questions about development,” says David Wilkes, BILD president and CEO. “Affordability will continue to be a challenge until structural remedies are introduced to fix the GTA’s housing supply shortage. It is clear that we all – industry, government and public – need to look for ways to build more housing faster and to mitigate unnecessary delays and costs on new housing.”

Remaining inventory in March included 11,744 condominium units and 5,054 single-family homes. Remaining inventory includes units in preconstruction projects, in projects currently under construction and in completed buildings.

 

March new home sales by municipality

Condominium units Single-family homes Total
Region 2019 2018 2017 2019 2018 2017 2019 2018 2017
Durham 35 14 188 173 66 209 208 80 397
Halton 70 64 110 107 59 296 177 123 406
Peel 84 99 197 307 126 366 391 225 563
Toronto 953 1,081 3,628 88 5 93 1,041 1,086 3,721
York 286 382 442 211 39 372 497 421 814
GTA 1,428 1,640 4,565 886 295 1,336 2,314 1,935 5,901

Source: Altus Group

RELATED READING

GTA builders launch public awareness campaign

New single-family home sales in the GTA jump in February

Development in the GTA

 

 

 

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_may19_industry_report_fi

Development in the GTA

Latest News


Development in the GTA

Recently I completed 16 months as the President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association of the Greater Toronto Area (BILD). With 1,500 member companies, BILD GTA is amongst the largest local home building associations in Canada, and with the level of residential and commercial construction occurring across the region, the time has flown by. A consistent occurrence during this period, however, has been the number of questions I get from members of the public about development and homebuilding in the region. Residential and commercial construction is highly visible, cranes dot the skyline from Mississauga to Pickering, and so it’s only natural that residents want to know what’s happening in their communities and why change is occurring. They have questions, such as “Is all this development necessary?” (Yes, we have a housing shortage in the GTA), “Who decides what gets built where?,” “Why in my neighbourhood?,” and perennially “Why is new development so dense?”

After all, that is a primary role of an industry association, to act as conduit between media, the public and the industry. Invariably, two things come out of these interactions. The first is that we get a better understanding and appreciation of the perspectives, concerns and questions of the nearly seven million residents of the region. We use this to inform our communications, columns, and interviews, as chances are the perspectives and questions are more broadly shared. In fact, we often reflect these perspectives in our interactions with municipal and provincial governments. The second is, in our responses we are able to provide answers and information. The development and construction process is complex, lengthy and highly regulated, and more often than not these inquiries are informed by perceptions and information people have gathered through the “grapevine.” Following our interactions, BILD GTA frequently receives a follow-up thanking us for the response, indicating we provided information that was not previously known. While the interaction may not change the concerns that gave rise to the inquiry in the first place, it always leads to a more informed discussion and debate.

The reality is that while the pace of development will ebb and flow year to year with economic cycles and other factors, the long-term trajectory will be for more residential and commercial development across the region. With the population of the GTA expected to grow 40 per cent by 2041 or approximately 115,000 new residents every year, providing places for all these new residents to live, work and play will require a concerted and prolonged development effort. This will require unprecedented levels of co-ordination and partnership between all levels of government, the industry and residents, and key to that is informed discussion and debate. The past 16 months have gone by in the blink of an eye, and I look forward to continuing to work with this dynamic industry for many years to come. Please keep asking us your questions and we will continue to answer them to the best of our ability. Together, we can have constructive dialogue that ultimately helps to inform and shape our region as it assumes its rightful place as a world class city.

DAVE WILKES is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD). Bild.ca

SHARE  

Featured Products


home_inspection_azari_fi

Yes, you do need a home inspection

Latest News


Yes, you do need a home inspection

With the surge in home prices in Ontario over the last few years, buyers have often opted to forego the inspection part of the process in order to make their offer more appealing to the seller. Once all the papers are squared away, though, the home will be yours to take care of – including all the good and bad.

Having an inspection will ensure that there are no unseen damages that will end up costing you in repairs in the future. When buying an older home, it’s easy for a standard renovation to turn into a costly one when you find out what’s behind your walls is no longer up to code. This will also make sure your family is living in a safe home that is up to current standards right when you move in.

An inspection will also include checking the roof and the foundation for any leaks or repairs that need to be made. This includes the attic and any exterior damage that you may not notice for years. Electrical, heating and cooling will be checked for efficiency as well, so you know what you might need to change in order to lower annual costs.

You can then make an informed decision on your purchase, and whether you decide to go with it. This knowledge could then allow you to lower the offer and save money for future renovations, if needed.

Vahid Azari is the founder of All Season Inspection, a full-service property inspection and energy auditing service organization.

SHARE  

Featured Products