Tag Archives: Dave Wilkes

THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Where did the money go?

THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Where did the money go?

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THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Where did the money go?

by Dave Wilkes
BILD

Parkland dedication fees should be used to build parks in the GTA.

Did you realize that when you sell and buy a new home in the GTA, as much as a quarter of the price consists of fees, taxes and charges imposed by the three levels of government?

Given how much these government levies add to the cost, it makes sense that we want governments to be responsible and transparent about how the funds are spent. Unfortunately, this is not always the case — and new homebuyers may be left wondering: “Where did the money go?”

One example is the parkland dedication fee. Ontario’s Planning Act allows municipalities to require that each new development contribute land for a park, or pay a fee to be used to purchase parkland, or to pay for buildings and machinery for parks or other recreational purposes. The idea behind parkland dedication is that adding new homes and offices applies additional pressures on existing parks, which can be relieved by asking development to contribute new ones.

Our industry supports the expansion of parkland in the GTA to accommodate growth. Parks provide enjoyment and recreation for residents, workers and visitors, as well as habitat for wildlife. But what happens when you pay for a park and don’t get one? We question whether parkland fees are always invested properly.

The City of Toronto, for instance, requires that a residential development in a parkland acquisition priority area — which covers most of the city — contribute 0.4 hectares per 300 units, with a cap of 10 to 20 per cent of the site area, or payment in lieu. Because development sites in the city tend to be small, many developments contribute money instead of land. This parkland fee can add almost $20,000 to the cost of a new highrise condo suite unit in Toronto. And parkland fees are even higher in other municipalities in the GTA.

According to an 2017 report from city staff, Toronto collected $482,930,013 cash-in-lieu-of-parkland payments from residential and industrial development for the 10 years between 2006 and September 2016. As of the end of September 2016, $196,454,624 in the city’s parkland reserve funds remained uncommitted. Shouldn’t this money actually be used for parkland acquisition and development? The city needs a realistic plan for how they are going to spend the money and provide residents with the parks they paid for.

Now there’s a proposal to update the rate of cash-in-lieu-of-parkland in many areas where significant development is happening — including the Yonge and Eglinton neighbourhood, and downtown Toronto. All of the proposed formulas would increase costs for new homeowners, further eroding housing affordability in the city. When you pay for a park, you should get one, or you should at least know how the money will be spent. All government fees imposed on new homeowners should be invested in a transparent and responsible manner. The upcoming municipal elections are a great opportunity to contact your local candidates about this and other housing issues.

Go to buildforgrowth.ca for more information.

David Wilkes is president and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), the voice of the home building, land development and professional renovation industry in the GTA.

For the latest industry news and new home data, follow BILD on Twitter, Facebook, BILD’s official blog, and bildgta.ca.


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New home market sees prices holding steady

New home market sees prices holding steady

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New home market sees prices holding steady

Sales of new homes in the GTA slowed down in July while prices held steady, the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) announced last week.

Total July new home sales of 1,071 units were down 44 per cent from last July and down 55 per cent from the 10-year average, according to Altus Group, BILD’s official source for new home market intelligence. Sales of new condominium apartments in low, medium and highrise buildings, stacked townhouses and loft units, at 855 units sold, were down 52 per cent from July 2017 and down 40 per cent from the 10-year average.

Sales of new single-family homes, including detached, linked and semi-detached houses and townhouses (excluding stacked townhouses), at 216 units sold, were up 85 per cent from last July — a month that saw the lowest single-family home sales in decades, with 117 units sold — but still 77 per cent below the 10-year average.

The benchmark price of new condominium apartments was $774,759, up 16.5 per cent from last July, but virtually unchanged from last month. The benchmark price of new single-family homes was $1,142,574, down 13.2 per cent from last July and just 0.85 per cent above last month.

“New home sales in the GTA typically take a breather in the summer months compared to the spring,” explained Patricia Arsenault, Altus Group’s executive vice president. “This July was no exception, although minimal new project launches in July, along with declining affordability of new condominium apartments due to recent price escalation, amplified the June-to-July decline in sales somewhat this year.”

With only two projects opening in July, the total remaining new home inventory decreased to 14,784 units, comprised of 9,931 condo apartment units and 4,853 single-family units. Remaining inventory includes units in preconstruction projects, in projects currently under construction and in completed buildings.

“We are still seeing a shortfall in condo apartment inventory,” said Dave Wilkes, BILD president and CEO. “Given the current pace of sales, we should have nine to 12 months worth of inventory, but we only have five. We expect that more condo apartment product will become available in the fall.”

Wilkes added that affordability remains an issue for many buyers.

“The prices of new homes are affected by, among other factors, the fees, taxes and charges added by all levels of government,” he said. “Municipalities have the most direct influence over affordability and supply of new housing, so leading up to the October 22 municipal elections, we are inviting people to send an email to their local candidates, asking them to make housing a priority. Start by visiting buildforgrowth.ca.”

July New Home Sales by Municipality**:

July 2018 Condominium Apartments Single-family Total
Region 2018 2017 2016 2018 2017 2016 2018 2017 2016
Durham 9 27 162 44 60 376 53 87 538
Halton 40 18 76 21 13 45 61 31 121
Peel 147 148 180 88 0 101 235 148 281
Toronto 568 1,134 1,645 1 9 114 569 1,143 1,759
York 91 471 187 62 35 286 153 506 473
GTA 855 1,798 2,250 216 117 922 1,071 1,915 3,172

Source: Altus Group


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Build For Growth: Help Make Housing A Priority

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Build For Growth: Help Make Housing A Priority

Help Make Housing a Priority in the Municipal Elections

Are you or your loved ones planning to look for a new condo or house in the GTA in the near future? Then you will want to pay special attention to the municipal elections coming up on October 22.

That’s because municipal governments have the most direct influence over new housing — what type will get built, how many units and where they will be located. If we want to be able to find new homes that suit our needs, at prices we can afford, we need municipal leaders who will make housing a priority and take action on increasing housing supply and affordability in our region.

With 115,000 people coming to live in the GTA every year, our region is projected to grow to 9.7 million residents by 2041. We should be building 55,000 new homes every year to keep up with housing demand, yet only 44,000 homes were built last year. A major reason for this shortfall is the sheer amount of regulation, a lot of it out of date, that slows down building and development. As a result, it now takes about 10 years to complete a lowrise or highrise project in the GTA. And because housing is in short supply, it is becoming less and less affordable, with government fees, taxes and charges further adding to the prices of new homes.

In the lead-up to the municipal elections, our Build for Growth campaign is putting forward a four-point plan on how local governments can increase housing affordability and supply. First of all, we are asking GTA municipalities to make sure government fees, taxes and charges applied to new homes are fair and equitable. Currently, fees applied by all levels of government can account for almost a quarter of the cost of a new home; those levied by municipalities typically make up more than half the total burden and are skyrocketing. These costs can price new homebuyers out of the market.

Second, municipalities need to prioritize the funding and building of good, reliable infrastructure, including roads, transit, parks, water and wastewater facilities. Without this crucial infrastructure in place, the building of new homes slows down or stops completely.

Third, local governments should streamline the planning approval process, which unnecessarily slows down development. Municipalities should pre-designate and pre-zone land for development, update local Official Plans and zoning bylaws, simplify the list of conditions for municipal approvals and encourage the province to expedite outstanding environmental assessments.

And finally, we are suggesting that municipalities adopt a Standard of Service Excellence for building permits and inspections. Speeding up these processes will make it quicker and easier for homeowners to renovate their homes or build secondary suites or laneway housing, which can help increase housing supply in established neighbourhoods.

Would you like to help make housing a priority in the municipal elections? We invite you to visit the Build for Growth campaign website, BuildForGrowth.ca, to get more information about the issues and send a letter to your municipal candidate to let him or her know that you care about housing issues.

DAVE WILKES is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

Bild.ca

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INDUSTRY EXPERT: The Waiting Game

INDUSTRY EXPERT: The Waiting Game

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INDUSTRY EXPERT: The Waiting Game

by David Wilkes

Looking to renovate? Getting permits and approval may take longer than the work itself

Your family is growing and you need more space. You have two options. You can sell your house and move into a bigger home, or you can renovate your home and add more living space. You love your neighbourhood and do not want to move, so you decide to renovate.

Your first inclination may be to focus on the latest trends and finishes, but before you do that, your time is much better invested in getting the necessary approvals and permits. In some cities in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), that can take months for a smaller renovation and up to a year for more ambitious projects.

Photography: bigstock.com
Photography: bigstock.com

REALITY BITES

Many homeowners are under the mistaken impression that it is as simple as filing your plans and obtaining your permit—a week or two and on to swinging hammers. The reality can be quite different. When planning a major renovation or custom-home build, the approval and permitting times can stretch for months, and may include multiple steps of getting approvals for variances to existing zoning requirements, setback regulations and obtaining approvals from other municipal departments like Urban Forestry. If re-zoning through the Committee of Adjustment is required, the entire process can take well up to a year.

Layered onto this, many municipalities are failing to meet The Ontario Building Code’s timeframes of just issuing a building permit in 10 business days, delaying renovation projects and adding unnecessary costs to projects. In 2017, in the City of Toronto, nearly half of all residential building permits were not issued within the required legislated timeframe.

RENO RED TAPE

The Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) reviewed 6,011 City of Toronto permits and the average timeframe for issuing these permits was 31.4 calendar days. That is two to two-and-a-half times the provincially mandated maximum. It is important to note that this review included thousands of applications from very basic and quick permits, to permits with values of over $100,000; the issuing of these permits took an average of 45 days or six weeks.

Further delays in the process come from a lack of access to inspectors and inspection delays that can tangle homeowners up in even more red tape. Your dream renovation has now become a bureaucratic nightmare. The permit and approval system needs a good renovation itself.

PROPOSED SOLUTIONS

BILD wants to put the customer first so they can enjoy their newly renovated or custom-built home sooner rather than later. Based on our members’ experience, we wrote the Service Standard of Excellence document to provide practical guidance to municipalities on how to speed up approvals and make the process more efficient.

We are asking cities to commit to a reasonable turnaround time for renovation permit applications, we are proposing the implementation of a one-window permitting, web-based portal that makes the application process smoother and transparent, and we are calling for improved service by building inspectors similar to the standards expected for Internet and telephone providers.

As we get closer to the 2018 Municipal Elections this fall, we will be meeting with councillors and mayors across the GTA to ask them to adopt the measures outlined in the Service Standards of Excellence and get them to provide building and renovation approvals and permits in line with the provincially mandated requirements.

David Wilkes is president and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), the voice of the home building, land development and professional renovation industry in the GTA.

For the latest industry news and new home data, follow BILD on Twitter, Facebook, BILD’s official blog, and bildgta.ca.


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Vaughan, Mississauga and Toronto sign Housing Pledge

Vaughan, Mississauga and Toronto sign Housing Pledge

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Vaughan, Mississauga and Toronto sign Housing Pledge

BILD sets out its four-point plan on how municipalities can help make housing more affordable and increase supply.

The Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) held press conferences in Vaughan, Toronto and Mississauga to launch its Build for Growth campaign that coincides with the 2018 municipal election.

The campaign outlines BILD’s four-point plan on how municipalities can help make housing more affordable and increase supply.

“Housing will be a key election issue in the Greater Toronto Area,” said Dave Wilkes, president and CEO of BILD. “Providing housing for the next generation is a challenge that needs to be solved in a partnership between residents, the building industry and municipal governments across the region.”

BILD’s four-point plan shows how municipalities can take a leadership role in increasing the supply of housing and support sustainable, affordable growth and make sure government fees, taxes and charges on new homes are fair and equitable, fund and build critical infrastructure, cut red tape, and adopt a Standard of Service Excellence for building permits and inspections in order to speed up building and renovations. The mayors of Vaughan and Mississauga, as well as Toronto’s deputy mayor, signed a Housing Pledge acknowledging that housing is an issue that must be addressed and that they are committed to engaging in a dialogue with government partners and the development community to expand the amount and types of housing options that are available. They believe that buying a new home should be a time to celebrate a major milestone and join a community. Over the next few months, BILD will be calling on all municipal candidates to sign the pledge.

BILD encourages citizens of the GTA and all municipal candidates to visit BuildForGrowth.ca to sign the Housing Pledge and make their voices heard. With 1,500 members, BILD is the voice of the home building, land development and professional renovation industry in the Greater Toronto Area.

http://www.bildgta.ca/


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Industry Report: New Residential Development Brings New Amenities to GTA Communities

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Industry Report: New Residential Development Brings New Amenities to GTA Communities

Have you noticed that when a community gets a new crop of houses, townhouses and condos, it also acquires a wider selection of shops and restaurants, new public spaces, maybe even a park or a community centre?

These are just some of the benefits that our communities receive when we build new housing for GTA residents.

With more people moving into an area, a larger number and variety of businesses — coffee shops, pizzerias, dentist offices, dry cleaners and fitness studios — can thrive. A great example is the Yonge St. and Eglinton Ave. neighbourhood. Along with condos, the area has lately added a renovated shopping centre, a major grocery store, a wider selection of unique restaurants and fun venues like board game cafes. Neighbourhood amenities like these don’t just make life more convenient and enjoyable, they also provide expanded employment opportunities in the area.

The rose garden at the Four Seasons Hotel in Yorkville.

Residential development also brings new parks to communities in the GTA and helps expand and maintain existing ones. The City of Toronto, for instance, asks builders and developers to set aside a certain amount of land on development sites for parkland or pay a fee to be used to purchase land for new parks or improve existing ones. The 3.1- hectare Canoe Landing Park in the CityPlace neighbourhood in Toronto, with its sports fields, walking paths and art by Douglas Coupland, is an example of a new park created through a parkland dedication agreement.

Other open spaces become available to the public when developers provide landscaped courtyards, walkways and plazas as community benefits. These privately owned, publicly-accessible places may be smaller than traditional parks, but they still provide much-needed retreats from the bustle of urban life.

For example, residents and visitors alike enjoy the rose garden next to the Four Seasons Hotel in Yorkville, and office workers soak up the sun on their lunch hour in the many landscaped parkettes that dot the Financial District.

Another benefit that residential development brings to communities is improvements to infrastructure such as roads, transit, sewers, libraries and community centres. Whether you are seeing work crews resurfacing roads in your neighbourhood or you are enjoying the new community centre in Markham, you can be sure that a significant portion of the funds for this infrastructure work came from development charges levied by municipal governments.

There is no doubt, however, that the central benefit of our industry’s work is bringing to market a supply of new houses, townhouses and condominium suites so that people who want to live in the GTA can find housing options at prices they can afford. As the municipal elections approach this fall, we will be encouraging GTA residents to ask their local candidates to commit to taking action on increasing housing supply. That way, we can all reap the many benefits of housing development.

DAVE WILKES is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD). Bildgta.ca

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THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Housing policies must focus on supply

THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Housing policies must focus on supply

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THE INDUSTRY LEADER: Housing policies must focus on supply

Not enough new housing is being built for sale or rent and this results in higher prices, higher rents and long waits lists.

by Dave Wilkes
BILD

The other day I was listening to pundits on talk radio debating the issue of housing affordability — and what can be done to address the high cost of putting a roof over your head.

It sounded like the experts were talking right past each other, apparently discussing completely different issues. I realized it was because their definitions of housing affordability were different.

It seems to me, though, that some of the solutions can be the same. Housing affordability is a complex subject. At the risk of oversimplifying, there are really three different definitions. The first is housing — houses and condos — that the average family can afford to buy. The second definition is housing that the average person can afford to rent. And the third is not-for-profit rental housing, where collective ownership (co-op) or a degree of social assistance (subsidized housing) helps ensure that the cost of housing can be borne within the income of the resident.

All of these definitions of housing affordability are valid and all come with specific issues to address if affordability is to be tackled as an issue. Unfortunately, as is often the case with highly political topics, it is the differences that get debated — winners and losers get picked and opportunities get missed.

What is common to all three definitions is lack of supply. Not enough new housing is being built for sale or rent, and there is not enough not-for-profit rental housing to meet the need. This results in higher prices, higher rents and long wait lists. A number of factors affect the supply of all three forms of housing. All are subject to the same lengthy bureaucratic approvals process prior to being built. All three require land that is adequately serviced with existing infrastructure that can accommodate the increased usage (for infill projects) or new infrastructure if it is an entirely new development. Lastly, all three forms of housing are subject to layers of regulation, reliance on community acceptance and the political will that exerts influence on building projects around the GTA.

Any one of these factors can add cost, impact the number of new units that come to market, delay new housing from being built or halt construction entirely.

On the cost side, newly built homes that fall under the first two definitions are also subject to government fees and charges that increase purchase price or impact rental costs. BILD recently published a study on the government fees, taxes and charges applied to new homes in the GTA. It demonstrated that the layers of tax-on-top-of-tax added almost 25 per cent, or $186,500, to the price of an average single-family home in the GTA.

In the lead-up to this year’s municipal election, we need our governments not to pick winners and losers, but to focus on housing policies and reforms that can have broad benefits and increase housing supply.

David Wilkes is president and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

He can be found on Twitter, Facebook, and BILD’s official blog.


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In His Own Words: Paying More Than Our Fair Share

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In His Own Words: Paying More Than Our Fair Share

By Dave Wilkes

What goes into the cost of building a new home, condo building or office development is more than meets the eye. It is not only the cost of the land, the excavation of the site, the materials and labour, but also the fees that municipalities across the region charge homebuilders and developers to construct the infrastructure required to service new development.

Infrastructure includes parks, libraries, roads, transit, sewers and emergency services. Investing in infrastructure benefits existing and new homeowners and those working in offices throughout the region. This investment is paid for by fees, known as development charges, which are charged to builders and developers by local governments across the GTA.

But ultimately, development fees are paid for by the new homeowners and businesses. The fees vary depending on infrastructure needs in specific areas as well as the type of unit being built and the number of people who are expected to live in or utilize the space.

For example, a new one-bedroom condo in the City of Toronto currently is assessed a development charge of $17,138. A non-residential non-industrial building is assessed a development charge of $207.52 per square metre. Current proposals being considered by Toronto would approximately double those charges.

Our members recognize and accept their responsibility for supporting the infrastructure that is required to service new neighbourhoods. But as municipalities across the region look to replace aging existing infrastructure, we are concerned that new neighbourhoods will be asked to absorb the costs disproportionately.

There is no doubt we need to reinvest in our cities, but these costs should be the responsibility of all of us, not just shifted onto those buying new properties.

Transit City, a development project in Vaughan, won the People’s Choice Award at the recent BILD Awards.

The numbers back up our concerns. Altus Group, a leading provider of data solutions to the real estate industry, indicated in a recent report provided to BILD that in Toronto, residential property taxes rose 2 per cent on average annually, between 2009 and 2016, while development charges increased 14.3 per cent on average annually between 2009 and 2018.

Our industry is committed to working with our partners in municipalities to fund growth. But we must ask the tough questions about how we pay for infrastructure in an equitable, transparent manner — and how we ensure that these costs are shared fairly between development charges that are paid by new development and property taxes that are paid by all. We all are responsible for ensuring that we build the type of cities we want.

How we answer the question of who pays for what, and the share of the costs between new and existing tax bases, will define the types of cities we build and the costs of the homes and offices in our cities. We need to find the right balance so that new homes are affordable and not priced beyond the reach of all but the wealthy.

On behalf of those who purchase new homes and offices, BILD intends to ask these questions this year as part of the fall municipal elections.

DAVE WILKES is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD).

Bild.ca

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In Conversation With: Dave Wilkes

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In Conversation With: Dave Wilkes

The new President and CEO of BILD

By Gale Beeby

Dave Wilkes has the municipal election at the top of his mind.

The new president and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) believes that it is imperative for his industry to inform the candidates and the public about the main issues surrounding housing. And he wants to remind everyone that the GTA is growing, and growing fast.

“There are two numbers everybody should remember: 9.7 million and 2041.

“Those numbers represent the population of the GTA in 2041. All that growth is good for the economy, but the municipalities in the GTA have got to start thinking about rezoning for all that growth and make sure that we can live, play and work in communities that work.

“I am impatient to do more,” said Wilkes, who grew up in Scarborough and was most recently the senior VP of the government relations and the grocery division at the Retail Council of Canada.

Needless to say, Wilkes has a passion for government relations.

“We’re going to be very aggressive in the coming municipal election, which will be held on October 22. We want to make sure each candidate is educated on housing issues. We’re going to ask them to sign a ‘Housing Pledge’ and hold all-candidates meetings and virtual town halls so the public knows where each candidate stands on the issues of affordable housing.”

BILD has 1,500 members, including builders and developers, renovators, manufacturers, suppliers, trade contractors, service and professional companies as well as financial and legal providers.

Q: What are some of the things BILD is going to undertake in the upcoming election?

A: Well, I have a column in a number of GTA-area media outlets (including this magazine), so they will be focused on the issues surrounding the election as they pertain to housing. It’s not just about development charges and the various land transfer taxes, it’s also about the types of housing that we need to build in order to house the 100,000-plus migrants into the GTA every year.

Q: Beyond the election, what else do you have planned?

A: I want to tell the story of the GTA. BILD can certainly take a leadership role in telling the civic building story. We have already produced one video and plan on making many more. (You can see “Creating a Community – The Challenge” on BILD’s YouTube). It’s not just about creating housing, but also healthcare, road, greenspace, education and parks.

We need to speak louder — I need to speak louder — and use every opportunity to get our voice out there and make an impact on consumers and come up with real world solutions.

Q: What is going to be the focus of that messaging?

A: Well, first we have to determine what we should own; everything can’t be a priority. Land availability, the cost of developments and proper infrastructure are our priorities. And we need to align those policies across the regions so that we can have smart growth into 2041.

BILDGTA.ca

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INDUSTRY EXPERT: Smart & Selective

INDUSTRY EXPERT: Smart & Selective

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INDUSTRY EXPERT: Smart & Selective

by David Wilkes

Partner with a Pro for your Reno

I am a proud Torontonian who is fiercely connected to my neighbourhood. I’ve lived in this great region my entire life and, for the last 25 years, raised my family in the east-end of Toronto. We’ve done more than one renovation to our house, which added value and made it our home. Like many Torontonians, my neighbourhood is a part of my identity.

In the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), we celebrate the diversity and uniqueness of our neighbourhoods. They are what make our region great. We value them and recognize the importance of creating livable communities through their development and revitalization.

Increasingly, GTA homeowners are choosing to stay in their neighbourhoods because, like me, they love them. They are renovating rather than selling and creating the home they want in the area they want to live.

Photography: BigStock.com
Photography: BigStock.com

REPUTABLE RESOURCE

There are more than 200 RenoMark renovators in the GTA. All of them agree to abide by the BILD Code of Ethics and a renovation-specific RenoMark Code of Conduct. They understand the value of customer service, provide warranties and continually educate themselves on trends, materials and new regulations.

UNDERGROUND ECONOMY SPIKE

Unfortunately, the introduction of the HST in 2010 accelerated the growth of an underground economy in the renovation industry. A report released by the Ontario Home Builders’ Association (OHBA) in November 2017, shows the amount of residential renovation spending through contractors that leaked underground fluctuated between 38 and 40 percent between 2010 and 2016.

The underground “cash” economy in home renovation and repair poses significant risks, including worker safety liability risks for the homeowner if workers are not covered by the WSIB, no warranties, unfair competition with reputable contractors and loss of tax revenues.

This underground industry also undermines the integrity of the HST system. The report suggested that provincial and federal governments lost $16 billion in potential tax revenues through residential renovations undertaken by illicit contractors in Ontario during the same period.

FINDING CONSUMER-FAVOURED SOLUTIONS

Instead of fostering an underground economy, which encourages the avoidance of paying taxes, the OHBA has recommended the Ontario government consider introducing a tax rebate that would incent homeowners to document properly, and report their contractor renovation projects as well as a Home Renovation Tax Credit for energy-efficient upgrades.

Our colleagues at the Canadian Home Builders’ Association are also active partners with the Minister’s Underground Economy Advisory Committee, sharing industry information and recommendations with the Canada Revenue Agency on how to best address the impact of working around the system.

BILD has written its own renovation Service Standard of Excellence that was presented to the City of Toronto, outlining a practical system that would put the consumer first. The Service Standard of Excellence would speed up approvals and make Toronto City Hall more efficient. This would ease consumer frustrations and steer them away from using the underground economy.

So, what can you do to protect yourself? If you’re considering a renovation, your first step is to go to renomark.ca. There you will find the RenoGuide (Five Steps to a Worry-Free Renovation), the RenoMark Code of Conduct and you can use the Find a Renovator tool to find a participating renovator near you. If you’re a renovator in the GTA looking to get involved with the RenoMark program, email us at membership@bildgta.ca.

David Wilkes is president and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), the voice of the home building, land development and professional renovation industry in the GTA.

For the latest industry news and new home data, follow BILD on Twitter, Facebook, BILD’s official blog, and bildgta.ca.


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