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Local Focus: Mississauga

Mississauga stands out from the crowd

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Mississauga stands out from the crowd

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots as a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that the community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys. 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

Waterfront recreation

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

More than 288 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario.

Key landmarks

  • Living Arts Centre
  • Mississauga Celebration Square
  • Paramount Fine Foods Centre
  • Sheridan College Business School
  • Square One Shopping Centre
  • University of Toronto Mississauga

Select housing developments

20/Twenty Towns by Consulate Development Group

Eleven 11 Clarkson by Saxon Developments

4Hundred East Mall by Haven Developments

Jewels of the Meadows by Ideal Developments

Lakeview Village by Lakeview Community Partners

Port Credit West Village by Port Credit West Village Partners


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Emblem Developments aims to make its mark in condo development

Emblem Developments aims to make its mark in condo development

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Emblem Developments aims to make its mark in condo development

Walking into Emblem Developments, the first thing that strikes me is the intersecting glass walls of the company’s 42nd floor Bay St. offices, which overlook the most expensive office space in Canada. I think to myself, this is no average builder. A writer in real estate for more than 20 years, I am more than intrigued, and want to learn more.

Emblem Developments aims to make its mark in condo development
Artform co-working lounge

I’m greeted by a background out of the TV show, Billions, a calm white environment, reminiscent of an art gallery, combined with the high energy of a stock trading floor. Incredible original art adorns the walls, set against a myriad of people focused on their computer screens. I can’t help but wonder, who is Emblem Developments and why have I never heard of them?

 

Emblem Developments
Artform condos south of Square One in Mississauga, by Emblem Developments 

As I sit in a comfortable boardroom overlooking the financial district of Canada, in comes the impeccably dressed Kash Pashootan, CEO and brand maven of Emblem Developments. He greets me warmly with a strong handshake and a genuine welcome. At first, I’m taken aback, maybe a little intimidated by his calm demeanour, and direct, let’s-get-to-it attitude.

Kash Pashootan, CEO and brand maven
Kash Pashootan, CEO, Emblem Developments

Pashootan is the visionary and leader of Canada’s fastest growing entrant to the condominium development market. A space for those with a keen sense of what people want and need in an ever-changing landscape. I ask him why condominium developments? He warmly smiles, and with a tone of incredible confidence replies, “We recognized that this industry would be a growth market in Canada for many years to come. As the cost of living rises, the demand for living ‘up’ will become more pronounced. This landscape, combined with $1 billion-plus of capital our investment management arm, First Avenue, manages, means we are able to take advantage of this for the benefit of our clients and firm.

“Investors want and need to be able to pursue growth in their portfolio outside of simply the stock market,” Pashootan adds. “In 2018, the stock market was down double digits and our real estate investments were up double digits. March of 2020 we saw most stocks drop as much as 30 per cent, but our real estate holdings held steady. And that makes a blue-chip investor, like myself and my clients, sleep very well at night.”

First Avenue has been featured in Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Globe and Mail, Maclean’s, Hong Times and Washington Post, to name a few. The company has built its reputation on its long term portfolio performance during good and bad markets.

“Managing stocks will always be a core focus for us, but first and foremost is protecting and growing the wealth of our clients,” says Pashootan. “When one’s portfolio is able to pursue growth and not have it solely reliant on stocks, given our exposure to real estate, it achieves an effective portfolio approach that up until recently only billionaire families were able to access.”

Emblem Developments has sites ongoing across Ontario, with more than 1,600 condominium units currently under construction, pre-sale and planning, in four distinct markets – Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton and Mississauga.

“The expansion is at a rapid pace because, like most pension funds or REITs, we don’t require third party financing to acquire a new development site,” says Pashootan. “With more than $1 billion of permanent capital under our management we are able to move faster than our competitors. Which places us in a very enviable position.”

Emblem Developments has already started construction on Robinson Village in Ottawa, comprising 291 units of purpose built rental living. Style and design are the pillars the Emblem brand is built on.

“Regardless of the market we are building in, you will feel the soul behind our brand when you see the buildings or walk through them. Our brand comes through in our design and our finished product,” says Shamil Jiwani, associate director of real estate for Emblem Developments. “We are obsessed with exceptional design, recognizing that it is the main factor that determines quality of life for a homeowner.”

Shamil Jiwani, director of real estate
Shamil Jiwani, associate director of real estate, Emblem Developments

Emblem’s next project in Mississauga is no exception to this unique philosophy. The new project is aptly named Artform, and located south of Square One. Emblem has spared no expense in its creative design of a timeless, cool and luxury feel in the heart of Mississauga.

The icing on this project is that the new community will be set against the new Dundas Connects transit system, which links Dundas from Oakville to Toronto in one line.

“This is a unique and incredible opportunity for condominium buyers to get in on the ground floor of this change that is happening in Mississauga,” says Hunter Milborne of Milborne Group.

“Emblem Developments is a full-service condominium developer,” adds Raki Raoufi, vice-president of construction, Emblem Developments. “We will design, build and service all of our units, which makes us care a little more, give a little more and hope you come back for a lot more.”

Raki Raoufi, vice-president of construction
Raki Raoufi, vice-president of construction, Emblem Developments

Raoufi brings with her more than 20 years of highrise building expertise to the Emblem brand.

“The Mark of Exceptional Design” is the Emblem mantra, and it seems to be spot-on. It becomes evident very quickly that no corners are being cut with any facet of the company’s business, most noticeably the quality and commitment of the experienced professionals I spoke to.

“I love design,” says Pashootan. “There is no substitute for great design. I am passionate about Emblem creating spaces that give you that intangible feeling of you don’t know why, but ‘it feels right.’ That feeling is not achieved by what kind of floors you have or the colour of cabinets. It is achieved by how all parts of the design interact, behave and work together. Exceptional design is not just our slogan, it’s our belief as an organization.”

I leave this interview with the conclusion that: Stocks and real estate can mix well together, not all Bay Street professionals are only number crunchers, and most interestingly, that Kash is a killer but more humble than most with a fraction of his success.

With more than $1.1 billion in real estate assets, Emblem’s mindset, and the strength of an award-winning team, the developer is truly making a mark in this industry.

Cooksville - BEFORE
Artform in Cooksville, today
Cooksville - AFTER
Artform in Cooksville, tomorrow

Click here to view video.

emblemdevcorp.com

This story previously appeared in Toronto Life magazine. 


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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga – standing out from the crowd

Latest News


Mississauga – standing out from the crowd

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots as a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that the community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys. 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

Waterfront recreation

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

More than 288 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

  • Living Arts Centre
  • Mississauga Celebration Square
  • Paramount Fine Foods Centre
  • Sheridan College Business School
  • Square One Shopping Centre
  • University of Toronto Mississauga

Select housing developments

20/Twenty Towns by Consulate Development Group

Amber at Pinnacle Uptown & Perla Towers at Pinnacle Uptown by Pinnacle International

Brightwater by DiamondCorp.

Brightwater by Dream

Brightwater by Fram+Slokker

Brightwater by Kilmer Group

Canopy Towers by Liberty Development Corp.

Condominiums at Square One District by The Daniels Corporation

Exchange District by Camrost Felcorp

Lakeview Village by Lakeview Community Partners

Oro at Edge Towers by Solmar Development Corp.

Tanu Condos by Edenshaw Developments

Westport Condos By Edenshaw Developments


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Local Focus: Mississauga

Standing out from the crowd in Mississauga

Latest News


Standing out from the crowd in Mississauga

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots as a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that the community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys. 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

Waterfront recreation

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

• More than 288.42 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

• Living Arts Centre

• Mississauga Celebration Square

• Paramount Fine Foods Centre

• Sheridan College Business School

• Square One Shopping Centre

• University of Toronto Mississauga

Select housing developments

20/Twenty Towns by Consulate Development Group

Eleven 11 Clarkson by Saxon Developments

Jewels of the Meadows by Ideal Developments

Lakeview Village by Lakeview Community Partners

• Parc Towns by The Daniels Corporation

• The Clarkson Urban Towns by Haven Developments

Tuxedo Park by Maple Valley Development Corp.


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Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Latest News


Mississauga is standing out from the crowd

Mississauga has always been a city of noteworthy accomplishments, from its inception as a city in 1974 combining the former townships of Lakeview, Cooksville, Lorne Park, Clarkson, Erindale, Sheridan, Dixie, Meadowvale Village, Malton, Port Credit and Streetsville; to being home to Canada’s longest-serving mayor, Hazel McCallion, from 1978 to 2014.

And now, literally at the time of writing, the City was hosting a Town Hall on seeking independence from the Region of Peel.

You might expect such a track record of ambition from one of the most populous – and fastest-growing – municipalities in Canada.

Covering a huge swath of land – 288 square kms, 13 km of which front Lake Ontario – Mississauga comprises many distinct neighbourhoods and communities. The former town of Port Credit, for example, once a sleepy little industrial locale, home to the iconic – and smelly – St. Lawrence Starch Co. plant from 1890 to 1990, today is a much sought-after residential area, thanks to its prized waterfront location.

Local histories

Many of these areas host annual festivals that pay respect to local histories. Streetsville, for example, holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival, paying homage to the area’s roots a mill town. And Port Credit’s Mississauga Waterfront Festival and the Southside Shuffle blues and jazz festival display everything that community has to offer.

With McCallion running the show over 12 consecutive terms, until she stepped aside and Bonnie Crombie won the election in 2014, Mississauga was known as a city of growth. McCallion consistently boasted she oversaw among the lowest taxes in Canada and made it easy for companies to do business there. Today, the area is home to more than 60 Fortune 500 companies, including Laura Secord Chocolates, Honeywell Aerospace, Walmart Canada and Kellogg’s Canada.

Succession

As for seeking its independence from Peel, Crombie’s office points to the following as motivation:

Population: Mississauga has the population to warrant becoming an independent city similar to other large municipalities such as Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa.

Stability: Mississauga is fiscally strong, has strong resident support and has the necessary capacity and experience to operate as an independent city.

Municipal service: A number of duplications, barriers and complexities in municipal service delivery could be eliminated if Mississauga became an independent city.

Future city building: As an independent City, Mississauga would have full autonomy to focus on City initiatives related to its future growth and development.

Cost: Mississauga pays 60 per cent of the overall property tax levy, yet owns only 29 per cent of regional roads.

Getting around Mississauga is, well, you are travelling over a vast area, and traffic these days… But Hwys 401, 403, 410 and the QEW all run for stretches through the city, and there’s no shortage of GO Transit and Mississauga MiWay Transit options.

For sports and recreation, again Mississauga is blessed with numerous recreational winter and summer sports leagues with decades of local history. Using the Streetsville example again, the Vic Johnston Community Centre dates back to 1961, and sits adjacent to Memorial Park and the Credit River.

And, following the Credit River down to well, Port Credit, Memorial Arena is another beautiful old barn, sitting adjacent to Memorial Park and facing Lake Ontario. The park itself serves as host location for some of the area’s largest festivals.

Then there’s the Paramount Fine Foods Centre (formerly Hershey Centre), where the Ontario Hockey League’s Mississauga Steelheads play, and which also is home to a number of community rinks.

Location, location, location

More than 288.42 square kms, 13 kms fronting Lake Ontario; bounded by Oakville, Milton, Brampton, Toronto and Lake Ontario

Key landmarks

• Square One Shopping Centre

• Mississauga Celebration Square

• Living Arts Centre

• Paramount Fine Foods Centre

• University of Toronto Mississauga

• Sheridan College Business School

Select condo projects

Aspire Condominiums by Conservatory Group

• Daniels City Centre by The Daniels Corporation

Edge Towers by Solmar Development Corp.

Exchange District by Camrost Felcorp

• Pinnacle Grand Park 2 by Pinnacle International

TANU Condos by Edenshaw Developments


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LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

Latest News


LOCAL FOCUS: Mississauga

by Gale Beeby

The sixth largest city in Canada continues to grow

HOUSING OPTIONS

Initially a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga’s growth has given it a unique identity. In 1935, the first suburban developments – corresponding with the opening of the QEW from Highway 27 to Highway 10 – popped up in the area south of the Dixie Road and QEW interchange. Over time, development moved north and west and large-scale developments started to happen in the 1960s and ’70s. Mississauga saw a condo boom starting in the 1990s and the area around Square One is now full of highrise buildings. Click here to see a list of homes for sale.

LEISURE PURSUITS

There is a lot to do in Mississauga, including a visit to the Art Gallery of Mississauga and the Living Arts Centre, which offers a number of musical performances, plays and children’s activities. The city’s largest festival happens on Canada Day and the Tree-Lighting Ceremony and New Year’s Eve bash at Celebration Square at City Hall are always popular.

Streetsville holds its annual Bread and Honey Festival the first weekend of June and Port Credit holds multiple festivals throughout the year, including Buskerfest, the Waterfront Festival, and the Southside Shuffle Blues & Jazz Fastival. In Malton, the Sikh community holds its annual Khalsa Day Parade, which attracts more than 100,000 people.

PARKS & REC

Mississauga boasts more than 522 parks and 225 kilometres of trails and woodlands. Some parks provide serenity, while others boast a variety of active recreational facilities, including indoor and outdoor skating rinks, cricket and soccer pitches, baseball and softball diamonds, football fields, tennis courts and childrens’ play areas and splash pads.

There are many golf courses in the city, including Derrydale, Credit Valley, Toronto Golf, Streetsville Glen, Lionhead, Grand Highland, Mississuaga Golf, BraeBen and Lakeview.

RETAIL THERAPY

Each of the villages that now make up Mississauga have lovely boutique-style shopping with cafés and restaurants to suit every taste and budget. Square One Shopping Centre, located at the City Centre, has over 350 stores and services and is surrounded by several bars and restaurants, a multi-screen movie theatre, City Hall, the Central Library and Playdium. The Erin Mills Town Centre is the second-largest mall in the city and is notable for its clock tower, mini-golf course and daycare centre.

EASY ACCESS

Mississauga is served by seven major highways, including the QEW, Highways 401, 403, 409, 410, 427 and 407. Mississauga Transit is the third-largest municipal transit system in Ontario, servicing about 43 million riders per year, and connecting with the TTC, Brampton Transit, Oakville Transit and GO Transit.

BY THE NUMBERS

Population: 722,000

Motto: Pride in our past, faith in our future

Walk scores:

City Centre: 91

Port Credit: 88

Erin Mills: 74

Cooksville: 68

Clarkson: 55

Applewood Heights: 52

Streetsville: 45

Sheridan Homeland: 44

Lakeview: 42

Lorne Park: 15

Mississauga.ca


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