Tag Archives: Colour

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Design Expert: Mood Makers

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Design Expert: Mood Makers

How colour and decor styles can change the feeling in a space

A home’s decor affects your mood. Why do you sit up so straight in some rooms and feel like you can put your feet up in others? Some of that has to do with furniture but mainly, colour and lighting create the mood in your home. Dimmers allow you to control and alter the mood in a space.

STRIKE A BALANCE

People often refer to deep colours being “dark,” however, dark really refers to the amount of light in a room vs. the colour on the walls. When the wall colour is deep and rich, it absorbs more light than colours like white or light pastels. The more light absorbed, the more we feel a sense of sonority and sombreness in the room. We refer to moods as “beaming with happiness,” or feeling “bright, up and happy,” all of which use “light” to describe mood. Conversely, we talk of “dark times” feeling “gloomy” or travelling with a “dark cloud.” The combination of paint colour, the quantity of light and the colour of the light can create feelings from danger to productivity, medical sterility to romance, intimacy and safety.

NATURE RULES

Have you ever wondered why most homes have white ceilings, warmer coloured walls and darker hardwood floors? This combination is the one that makes people feel most comfortable. It’s the same combination as the sky, the trees and the earth, as you walk through a forest. Once you know that rule, you can start to play with it by having painted ceilings, light-wood floors, etc. These combinations change the mood of the room because it is different than normal. Very deep colours on the walls also create a feeling of intimacy and sonority because the walls feel closer to you. The deep colours absorb most of the light. Without getting into the physics, the room feels more like “night” and we lose our ability to fully determine the dimensions of the room.

LIGHT CONTROL

In order to play with mood, we adjust the amount of light and the light’s colour temperature. We are all now familiar with the labels on light bulbs that say “warm white, soft white, daylight” etc. These words refer to the colour temperature measured in “degrees Kelvin” All you really need to know is that the lower the number, the “warmer” the colour. 2700-3000 is normal residential light while 5000K is more suited to jewelry stores and museums. The warmer the light the more like a “candle” it is. If the lighting is low, the more intimate the room feels. A kitchen, for example, needs to go from “meal preparation work space” to “romantic dinner date.” This is why most designers insist on dimmers everywhere. The dimmers allow you to alter the mood, by altering the light.

Everyone has a slightly different response to colour and light. It’s important you organize the lighting plan for your home to make sure there is light on every square foot of the floor, and then you can play with the mood to suit the people in the room.

DRAW THE EYE TO ART

The light and wall colour also allow us to feature works of art that adorn the walls. A white wall with white painting is very subtle, while a black painting on a white wall is very dramatic. The lighting plan allows you to feature the art in the room by adding specific “art lights.” Essentially, the lighting plan tells people entering the room where to look first by providing that element with more light. The featured art or sculpture also affects the mood of the room. Think about your mood when you look at art that is bright coloured and “cartoon-like” vs. a battlefield as night falls. Art is an expression of the artist to evoke a feeling or mood.

You can play with colour, art accessories and light level throughout the year and stay in control of the mood your home evokes. If nature is affecting your mood outside, you can control your mood once you come inside!

Extensive experience in residential, commercial and hospitality design. Principal of design firm Grafus Design Build, Glen Peloso is frequently in the media as design expert on the Marilyn Denis Show, and CHCH Morning Live, a contributor to Global Morning News, Breakfast Television Toronto, past series with HGTV and the Food Network, along with Radio and Blogs. Reporting on design trends from around the world, his work has been featured in various print publications throughout North America. Twitter: glenpeloso Instagram: glenpelosodesigner

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Cover Story: Living In Colour

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Cover Story: Living In Colour

Designer Rebecca Hay puts her fail proof colour formula to the test in her own vibrant living room

By Rebecca Hay

Photography By Stephani Buchman

Most of us love a space that has just the right pops of colour, it feels inviting and lively. However, many of us find it intimidating to decorate with colour. Where do you start? How do you ensure you don’t “overdo” it? Decorating with colour can be oh-so-rewarding. After all, life is meant to be lived in technicolour, not in black and white. Here are my tips on how to live and work with colour.

COLOUR PSYCHOLOGY

With every space I design, including my own home, colour is an integral element to creating the right mood. My goals are always to create spaces that are warm, unique and inviting. Colour allows me to do this every time. The psychology behind colour is a fascinating study. There’s no surprise that yellow is a cheerful colour that promotes optimism. Blue, however, is suggested to be the preferred colour for men. Blue is associated with tranquility and reliability, providing a sense of security and stimulates productivity. Before delving into designing any space, think about the mood you want to convey. Is it a cool, relaxing space or a warm, inviting one where dinner parties end in dance parties? You don’t need a degree in psychology to figure out which colours are right for you. Trust your gut and you will never go wrong, but it’s important to be mindful of the mood and energy you are trying to evoke.

I chose this fun contemporary Jonathan Adler Kravet fabric to add further colour and life to the space. The contemporary chevron contrasts nicely with the traditional moldings and historic features of the home.

YIN-YANG

In our living room, it was essential that it appeal to both men and women. I wanted it to be bright and energizing as this is the main sitting and socializing area of the home. The drapery fabric was our inspiration and starting point. I knew we wanted to energize the space with yellow and we already had the retro navy chairs to work with, so I chose to balance the navy of the chairs with bright-yellow custom drapery. The yellow creates a wow-factor and sets the tone for a playful and cheery mood.

BALANCING ACT

Finding the right balance of colour is also key in achieving a cohesive design. It’s important to balance any bold colours with lots of neutrals. A little trick that I like to use is the 60-30-10 rule. When decorating a particular room, divide the colors into percentages: 60 per cent of a dominant colour, 30 per cent of a secondary colour, 10 per cent of an accent colour, and you will never go wrong. The neutral walls, sofa and rug make up the largest percentage, followed by the yellow of the drapery, pillows and art, which provide visual interest. Finally, the navy chairs and small pops of blue throughout round out the 10 per cent, creating a little extra pop. When the right balance is achieved, the design feels harmonious and comfortable.

THAT EXTRA OOMPH

We also added a little extra pop. In addition to the three dominant colours, we chose to complement the blues with hints of orange. Adding a few “bonus” colours adds a little extra interest and variety. I found an old traditional wingback armchair in desperate need of TLC, and recovered it with this bold contemporary Jonathan Adler orange fabric. It’s cosy, warm and inviting while adding some traditional sophistication to the space. To add cohesiveness, we repeated the orange hue in the custom toss cushions by using a modern ikat fabric that has a blend of yellow and orange.

Paint PICK: Gray Mist 962, Benjamin Moore

THE POWER OF REPETITION

The last key to decorating with colour is repetition. Repetition is key to creating a cohesive design. By repeating a colour multiple times in a space, it feels purposeful and comforting. The warm wood of the vintage teak coffee table and the bamboo roman blind add warmth, and layer in another shade of orange to the space. It’s not enough to have a large amount of colour in one piece of furniture or on accessories. It’s the repetition of this colour throughout the space in varying quantities that unifies the design and makes it feel purposeful.

In our living room we have found a comforting and beautiful balance of colour. It’s a family space that feels modern and sophisticated. Contemporary fabrics and traditional bones make it an inviting and fun place for social gatherings or curling up by the fire with a book. It’s proof that by taking the plunge and designing with colour, you can create a space that is visually beautiful, intriguing, and at times surprising.

SOURCES FABRIC- Kravet; PAINT- Gray Mist 962, Benjamin Moore; CARPET IN LIVING ROOM West Elm; CARPET IN DINING ROOM Dominion Rug & Home; DINING TABLE – custom by RHD; CHAIR – clients re-purposed; ARTWORK – clients

Designer Rebecca Hay, Principal Designer of Rebecca Hay Designs Inc., is a Toronto-based boutique design firm offering complete design & renovation services for residential, commercial and vacation properties for over a decade. Known and celebrated for her design work and appearances on various acclaimed HGTV shows, Rebecca and her team design classic, livable spaces that reflect the homeowner’s personality. Servicing clientele throughout Toronto, the GTA and Canada. rebeccahaydesigns.com

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Style Stamps

Style Stamps

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Style Stamps

by Samantha Sannella

It’s all in the details

Finishing touches emphasize the style and design of a home. From practical to the whimsical, consider some of these options.

Doors and Hardware

Interior doors are a major component of interior design and convey the style of the home. Take time to explore the hundreds of options that are available. For the best in quality, choose solid core or solid wood doors. They may be more expensive, but well worth the investment. Glass inserts in doors promote an elegant look. Check out doorsforbuilders.com.

Choosing the right hardware to go with the doors is just as important. If the home is traditional, consider oil-rubbed bronze or copper. Brushed nickel works well in transitional or eclectic homes. For a contemporary look, stainless-steel lever handles make a modern statement. Don’t forget to match the hinges to the door handles.

Trim, Moulding and Baseboards

Trim, moulding and baseboards also accentuate the style of the home. A contemporary look can be achieved with the simplicity of straight moulding, which is also much easier to dust and keep clean. For rooms with high ceilings, consider deep baseboards and large crown mouldings to make the space more luxurious. Moulding can also be used for decorative detailing such as coffered ceilings.

Window Treatments

Drapes help to soften the interior of the home with warmth and texture. Finials on drapery rods add another decorative element. Drapes work well with traditional and transitional interiors, and the type of rods and finials you choose reinforce the style. Visit worldmarket.com for a set of whitewashed bird finials, plus other fun options.

Simple roller blinds emphasize a modern aesthetic appeal. You can’t go wrong with a light-filtering neutral fabric, but certain types of shades, like vertical blinds, tend to date a space. For some great ideas visit theshadestore.com.

Wall Coverings and Paint

Wall coverings are making a huge comeback — and they add style, beauty and dimension to a room. Choose from an endless array of colours, patterns and shimmers. Custom patterns can also be created.

A fresh coat of paint goes a long way to define a space. Paint manufacturers make life easier by creating pre-determined palettes of neutrals and colours. Check out the 2015 Colour Forecast in this issue of Ontario Design.

Lighting

One of the most dramatic additions to the interior of a home is lighting. Chooses fixtures that complement the door hardware and the overall style of the home. Also pay attention to the bulb type and colour rendition, so that the home is consistent. ‘Cleanability’ is an important factor to consider when choosing lighting.

Switch Plate Covers

For added pizzazz, install new switch plate covers. This is a super easy, and economical way, to add style to a home. For trendy decor, consider switch plates with hidden screws. Or for the ultimate in a contemporary statement, check out Le Grand line (legrand.ca), available at Lowes.

SAMANTHA SANNELLA, BFA ID, M ARCH,

is an internationally renowned expert in the field of design and architecture.


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Paint Forecast - 2015

2015 Paint Forecast

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2015 Paint Forecast

by Catherine Daley

Neutral is OUT and Colour is IN

When it comes to paint colours for 2015, it’s all about self expression. Paint companies have introduced some bold and sassy colours for the coming year, reflecting a heightened confidence level amongst Canadians.

Photos courtesy of Benjamin Moore®, PPG Pittsburgh Paints®, DULUX®, Sico® and Beauti-Tone.

SICO®

SICO® Paint highlights a blue theme with shades ranging from aqua to deep slate, along with fruity reds and jewel tones.

 

BENJAMIN MOORE®

BENJAMIN MOORE® has taken their cue from the environment, and introduces Guilford Green as their signature colour. It’s a silvery green hue like the underside of leaves blowing in the wind, which complements both modern and traditional styles. Their 2015 colour palette includes green, blue, blush and berry shades.

“We chose Guilford Green as our 2015 Colour of the Year, because it can be the hero or the highlight in any room, enhancing the architectural identity of a space,” says Ellen O’Neill, creative director at Benjamin Moore. “Guilford Green is the perfect thread to connect nature, spaces and interiors with colour schemes that signify fresh energy and growth.”

A sense of optimism prevails in Benjamin Moore’s balanced palettes, which also include Seahorse, Cinnamon Slate and Radicchio. Using warm, cool, dark and light layers of the same hue injects a fresh, cohesive approach when designing a home. Additional layers of texture are created by using various sheens of paint.

 

BEAUTI-TONE

BEAUTI-TONE’S trending colour is a blue-jeans-inspired shade called Fishing for Compliments. “Next year, beautiful blues will surround us, in fashion and at home, “says Bev Bell, creative director, Beauti-Tone Paint and Home Products Division, Home Hardware Stores Limited.

 

DULUX®

DULUX® unveils a colour palette reminiscent of exotic global destinations with rich, diverse colours. They announced Tropic Night as their 2015 colour of the year, a vibrant blue that evokes images of a sparkling Caribbean Sea.

 

PPG PITTSBURGH PAINTS®

PPG PITTSBURGH PAINTS® brings it all home with an in-store colour workstation. Available at dealers of PPG Pittsburgh Paints across Canada, integrated digital touch screens allow consumers to virtually choose a paint chip and paint the walls of a room setting of their choice. By scanning the chip into the computer, they can view different colour schemes to best suit their decor. “The new PPG Colour Work Station is designed to provide added ease and inspiration in the colour selection process,” says Dee Schlotter, North American colour marketing manager, PPG Architectural Coatings.

Consider the following tips from PPG Pittsburgh Paints when dealing with challenging spaces.

  • Small rooms can appear larger by using a unified colour. Paint the trim in the same shade as the walls. This technique fades defining lines, while making the room feel more spacious.
  • To avoid the tunnel effect of a long hallway, paint the two parallel walls different colours. Select a mid-tone for the one wall and then choose a hue two shades lighter on the same colour strip. This will make the hall appear wider. To add interest, choose a standout colour for the end wall.
  • To help distract from clutter and showcase collectibles, consider using a bold tone on the back of shelves or glass-faced cabinets.
  • And contrary to popular belief, most designers agree that ceilings don’t have to be painted white. In fact, a white ceiling can be a distraction. Again, opt for a creamier shade to complement the wall colour, or use a dark, matte finish to highlight a beautiful light fixture and add drama to a room.
PPG Pittsburgh Paints’ THE VOICE OF COLOR® program introduces a collection of four new colour palettes, which includes Blue Paisley – one of the featured colours of the year.

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