Tag Archives: Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA)

CHBA names winners of 2020 National Awards for Housing Excellence

CHBA names winners of 2020 National Awards for Housing Excellence

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CHBA names winners of 2020 National Awards for Housing Excellence

The Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) has announced the winners of the 2020 CHBA National Awards for Housing Excellence, celebrating the best of the best from across Canada.

Rosehaven Homes' The Randall Residences in Oakville
Rosehaven Homes’ The Randall Residences in Oakville

Rosehaven Homes of Oakville, Ont. won the Marketing Excellence Award for overall success in marketing categories. Rosehaven also took home the marketing awards for Digital Media Campaign – Mid- to Highrise, and Print Ad, for The Randall Residences in Oakville. Rosehaven’s marketing was created with McOuat Partnership of Markham, Ont.

Minto Communities, another GTA builder, won the Net Zero Home Award, Mid- to Highrise Condo or Apartment Project (planned) for its Toronto development The Saint, Brochure/ Kit for 123 Portland, also in Toronto, and the Net Zero Home Award for the 2019 Minto Dream Home in support of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario.

Located at Church and Adelaide, The Saint is designed to honour the preserved historic buildings of the neighbourhood, including the nearby St. James Cathedral. Inside, Japanese minimalism inspired design with biophilic elements combine to create a serene environment, and 10,000 sq. ft. of amenity space focused on health and wellness provides residents with a home where they can “find their centre.”

For a complete list of winners, visit chba.ca.


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Building Codes

Proposed ‘Alterations to Existing Buildings’ will change the way building codes apply to renovations

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Proposed ‘Alterations to Existing Buildings’ will change the way building codes apply to renovations

In some parts of Canada, renovation work is required to follow the current building code that’s in effect. In other parts of the country, renovations only need to meet the “code of the day” – the requirements that were in effect when the house was originally built. This could all change with a new policy coming from the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes on “Alterations to Existing Buildings,” which could spell new requirements for renovations to existing homes.

Renovating for the Future

Canada has committed to significantly reducing its greenhouse gases (GHGs) by 2030. The target is to achieve levels 30% lower than what we had in 2005 – a substantial undertaking. Canada has 14 million residential residences, and approximately 49% of the current housing stock was built before 1980. Most of these older buildings are far behind new homes when it comes to energy efficiency. Even if all the new homes built from now until 2030 (about 180,000 per year, or 1.8 million total) were built to “net-zero” energy efficiency, we still wouldn’t hit our target.

The only way the goal can be achieved is if we renovate the existing housing stock to make it more energy efficient. Canada has 7 million homes that were built before 1980. That’s a lot of opportunity for renovators.

The New Plan: “Alterations to Existing Buildings”

All levels of government are serious about meeting the GHG targets by 2030. To get us there, they have only two methods: they can persuade, or they can regulate.

Persuasion comes in the form of grants, low-interest loans, or tax credits. It makes the offer too enticing for a building owner to refuse. Regulation, on the other hand, removes the element of choice. It mandates minimum levels of performance and enforces it through inspections. A combination of both persuasion and regulation is considered in the draft CCBFC policy paper “Alterations to Existing Buildings” to drive improvements in the energy efficiency, accessibility, seismic resistance, structural integrity, and fire safety of existing homes.

The Roll Out

The policy paper proposes that when new requirements for renovation are adopted, they will not immediately apply to all existing buildings. In other words, homeowners will not get a notice from government to renovate their residences for energy efficiency. Instead, it is proposed that new requirements will come into play only once they have been “triggered.” What will trigger the new code requirements? First, the change to the building must be a voluntary decision by the building owner. Then, depending on the scope of the work and the changes being made, the building code will specify if the changes being made “trigger” the new requirements. If they do, the code will also specify which aspects of that building will need to be upgraded. The extent to which the home needs to be upgraded will fall somewhere between its existing state and minimums of the current code.

For example: Let’s say an owner decides to alter, upgrade, or change the function of a building. This could trigger improvements to the energy efficiency, accessibility, seismic resistance, structural integrity, or fire safety to meet the current code. That scope will obviously mean more work than the owner had originally intended, so to fund this extra work there will need to be persuasive tools such as incentives, grants, and/or tax credits.

What are the Triggers?

At this stage everything about “Alterations to Existing Buildings” is “proposed”. Nothing has been approved or decided upon. The following content is intended to provide you with information, but please note that any of this can – and likely will – change before it is finalized.

Not a trigger:

  • Cost The recommendations at this time clearly indicate that the cost of the change should not be a trigger. Costs change over time and vary across the country.
  • Involuntary changes For example, if a home is damaged by something typically covered by home insurance (for example, a hurricane), alteration requirements would not apply, because the repair is not deemed to be voluntary. Building owners will be able to repair their properties after a natural disaster without triggering requirements.
  • Normal wear and tear If a building owner is doing maintenance or repairs due to normal wear and tear, or replacing a component with something similar, they will be exempt from alteration requirements. Examples of this could include re-roofing or replacing an old furnace with a new one.

What could be a trigger:

“Alterations to Existing Buildings” proposes that the following voluntarily changes may trigger requirements:

  • A system(s) upgrade
  • Space reconfiguration
  • Change of occupancy
  • Addition, and/or
  • Other change (yet to be defined)

In these cases, the significance of the change will drive the requirements of what needs to be done. If the work is deemed to be a “minor” change, requirements will be applicable only to the area being changed. However, if the work is deemed to be a “major” change, requirements will be applicable to all directly affected systems. The criteria to differentiate between minor and major changes will be important, as well as the consistent interpretation of this criteria by building officials across the country.

“Alterations to Existing Buildings” will have a significant impact on the renovation industry in Canada. The Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) is actively involved at all levels of the Association providing input to the discussions on behalf of the industry. Much of this work is being done by CHBA’s Technical Research Committee and the Canadian Renovators’ Council.

As a renovator, your expertise is both needed and welcome. If you’re not a member of CHBA, impending code requirements for alterations to existing buildings should be the “trigger” that gets you to join. If you want to be “in the know” and get involved, talk to your local home builders’ association (HBA). Find a local HBA near you by looking on our website at CHBA.ca.

Stay tuned for more on this important issue in the future.

Gary Sharp
Gary Sharp

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Optional incentives - Want to keep your team? Offer employee share options

Optional incentives – Want to keep your team? Offer employee share options

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Optional incentives – Want to keep your team? Offer employee share options

As a businessowner, you know the value of having a solid team to help drive growth and continued success. How to retain valued employees in today’s evolving market is another matter. Offering a stake in the business is one option that is gaining popularity among construction company owners, particularly when planning for retirement.

In a recent webinar for CHBA members, CHBA CEO Kevin Lee and Eben Louw, Partner of Succession Services at national accounting firm MNP, discussed how to retain your best employees through bonuses, profit sharing, and employee ownership plans. (Visit chba.ca/webinars to watch the recorded webinar.)

In this article, MNP’s Louw delves into the critical first step of structuring such plans: being sure of your business and personal goals. With a challenging environment and a younger workforce that may be motivated in different ways than previous generations, exploring different employee incentive options is becoming critical to achieve company goals. Employee share ownership programs (ESOPs) or employee profit-sharing programs (EPSPs) increasingly are gaining popularity, for retaining or creating incentives for one or more employees, succession planning, or because it worked well for another company.

The right questions to ask, however, may be deeper ones about your goals that are not short-term but are intended for the next three years or longer. You need to be crystal clear on these goals before a plan for employee ownership or profit sharing can be created and executed successfully.

 

Begin with an end in mind

Unsuccessful bonus or ownership plans often have no criteria attached to them. They aren’t linked to the company’s goals and expected outcomes, and aren’t entirely effective in moving the company forward.

The higher the level of uncertainty regarding desired outcomes, the less the incentive to do better. It is therefore critical to start with goals. Effectively, you have to decide where you want your team to help take your company before you reward them for their hard work.

Goals are varied and unique to your company and your situation. They can be related to company growth, as in a particular product line, division, or geography, or can seek to improve areas of vulnerability such as dealing with increasing competition, employee retention, or high cost of operations, amongst others. You are looking for specific people to contribute to specific outcomes and goals.

A critical consideration while outlining goals is identifying the owner’s or leadership’s personal goals. Plans would be designed differently for owners or leaders looking to retire in three to five years, compared to those who will be operating the business longer term.

Once the objective is clearly articulated, the next step is to create a strategy to help you get to your desired outcome.

Build a strategic program

People often think an employee incentive program related to the company’s success is based on an ownership stake in the company. But there are two forms of rewards to encourage ownership behaviour in employees.

One option allows employees to share in profits, and the other enables them to share in ownership. Both work and can even be used together very effectively.

How you structure these rewards and which options you select – whether a distinct type or a combination of the two – are entirely dependent on your specific business situation and goals, and there is no one-size-fits-all program.

Certain benefits apply to all types of programs, including:

  • Creating an employee ownership mentality.
  • Boosting productivity.
  • Increasing alignment of personal and company goals.
  • Building a self-motivating company culture.

Employee Profit-Sharing Programs

EPSPs, as the name suggests, are formalized profit-sharing programs in which employee incentives are linked to sharing profits and not ownership of the company. Various approaches are possible and some structures even allow for tax benefits.

The benefits of profit-sharing plans are that they can provide immediate rewards and help build motivation, while simultaneously retaining key employees. They are also relatively easier to create and manage than ownership-sharing plans as there are less legal complexities and employee rights to manage.

Employee Share Ownership Programs

ESOPs often incorporate the profit-sharing features of EPSPs and offer an ownership stake to employees. These range from small minority stakes to a gradual transfer of controlling ownership during the management buyout of a business.

The benefits of ESOPs are often longer-term retention of key people, especially if change in ownership is being phased in due to retirement or the owner’s exit from the business. They are a good succession mechanism and can also be a selection ground for future owners.

Share-ownership plans are typically more complex to set up than profit-sharing plans due to additional valuation and legal complexities.

Select the right people

Once your goals are clearly outlined, it is a key time to identify and select the right people to help you get there through ownership or profit sharing.

It’s important to identify the people who are critical to achieving your objectives. The person, group of individuals, or teams that you select should be the ones who will stay with the company, be part of your company’s end goal, and fuel it. They should display the ability to truly believe in the objectives and be self-motivated to lead the company towards success, functioning as dynamos within the organization. The right people will make a large difference and drive growth and change.

It is worth mentioning the people you select should already be displaying ownership thinking capabilities, even before being offered the incentives. Then, when you add incentives to make key parts of the business self-motivated and pointed in the same direction, the collective effort is greater.

Often people are selected for ownership or profit sharing for reasons such as tenure or a sense more is owed to them. While these may be good reasons, they should not be the primary decision-making criteria. A forward-thinking and strategic mindset is critical while making decisions on employee ownership or profit sharing, so the program magnifies the company’s results.

Throughout the processes, two owner behaviours will drive your program’s success: engagement and education. Both the company and the employees benefit from consistent dialogue on the program. The company understands its employees’ motivations and employees understand the company’s desired outcomes and their role in achieving the outcomes. Combined, this mutual support will greatly enhance the success of your company and its people, and how they share in the results they are working for.

To wrap up, employee ownership programs meet more success when you clearly define your end goals and build a program that empowers your people. Once complete, see how they move your company forward in a significant way.

For more information, contact by Eben Louw, CPA, CA, Partner, Business Consulting and Assurance, at 604-853-9471 or eben.louw@mnp.ca.

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This column first appeared in the Spring 2020 issue of Building Excellence, the official members’ magazine of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association. For more information on the benefits of being a member of the CHBA, visit CHBA.ca. To view more content from Building Excellence magazine, visit BuildingExcellence.ca.


 

 

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PEER Review - Introducing the Prefabricated Exterior Energy Retrofit Methodology

PEER Review – Introducing the Prefabricated Exterior Energy Retrofit Methodology

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PEER Review – Introducing the Prefabricated Exterior Energy Retrofit Methodology

As Canada’s existing housing stock ages, more and more homes will need to be renovated – not only to update their looks and adapt to how people use their homes today, but for increased energy efficiency. Our country has 14 million residences, and approximately half of that stock was built before 1985. Given that a home built to code today is 47% more efficient than one from 1985, if Canadians truly want to address climate change within the housing sector, we’re going to have to get innovative.

CHBA and its leading members have been working hard to pursue energy efficiency innovations for voluntary adoption, staying ahead of the curve while advocating that regulation wait until next levels don’t reduce affordability, both for new homebuyers and Canadians who already own a home. When possible, CHBA works with government to find solutions and offer industry assistance for research and development.

One promising approach that is currently being explored is using modular construction technology in renovations. The Prefabricated Exterior Energy Retrofit (PEER) methodology is being championed by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and was recently presented during a meeting of CHBA’s Canadian Renovators Council.

Before
Before

After
After

Using PEER technology in renovations

Applying the PEER technology involves four key steps:

  1. The building is accurately measured.
  2. Large exterior, airtight, super-insulated cladding panels are designed.
  3. The panels are manufactured offsite.
  4. The panels are delivered to the site and installed.

Utilizing PEER methodology will bring Canadian-manufactured housing companies together with renovators to create a market for prefabricated, energy efficient façades which can be retrofitted onto existing buildings.

The pictures (on the facing page) illustrate the potential of the process on a simple construction trailer which NRCan presented as a PEER “Proof of Concept” pilot. This gave the researchers a first-hand opportunity to study the construction retrofit process, assess the opportunities for energy performance potential, and determine the practical implications for construction.

This approach to renovation has several advantages:

  • Speed. Once the industry has experience, PEER has the potential to significantly reduce the time it takes to renovate homes and buildings to an improved level of energy performance.
  • Enhanced Performance. The PEER panels can be designed to add significant levels of insulation and improve the overall airtightness of a building. This improves occupant comfort, reduces utility costs, and protects the owner from future escalation of energy fuel costs.
  • Occupant Convenience. Since the renovation is completed largely from the outside, disruption to occupants is minimized. In many cases the occupants are not displaced by the renovation work.
  • Improved Curb Appeal. The renovation provides a complete facelift for the building. With appropriate material selection, the exterior will remain beautiful and maintenance-free for years.
  • No Loss of Floor Area. Many of Canada’s older homes have limited floor space. Occupants will appreciate the fact that the renovation is exterior and does not affect the useable interior floor space.

A Brief Overview of the Process

Measuring the Building

All seasoned renovators understand the importance of accurate measuring. So how close do the measurements need to be? For the position of windows, the window openings (height and width), and the overall building width, each has to be within ¼” (6 mm). Building height from the top of the foundation to the soffit, the average grade to the top of the foundation, and the centerline of building penetrations (including utility meters and service entrances) need to be within 1″ (25 mm).

The options for taking the measurements include:

  • Measuring by hand – This is the lowest cost, but least accurate.
  • Total Station Theodolite – While many of us have never employed this technology, equipment and operators are widely available. It is extremely accurate but does not capture as many points and as much detail as laser scanning. The data is easily imported into CAD drawings.
  • 3D Laser Scanning – This produces detailed datasets but they may be so large they are hard to work with. This approach has a high degree of accuracy. Special software is required to use the data. The scanner has difficulty capturing data from very dark or reflective surfaces.
  • 3D Photogrammetry – This technology uses a high-resolution camera to take pictures of the building, then uses software to calculate the measurements. The accuracy is lower than the theodolite and the laser. This technology is commonly used today for estimating roofing projects using aerial photos taken from planes or drones.

Designing the Panels

The panels include a “squishy” layer for plumbing the panel where it meets the existing building. Panels need to address the insulation requirements as well as airtightness.

PEER Panel Manufacturing

Panels can be constructed up to 24′ (7.4 m) in length. Ideally, panels will be manufactured offsite in a climate-controlled facility.

PEER Panel Delivery and Installation

Completed panels are transported to the site where they are moved into position with a crane. The panel’s weight is supported on brackets attached to the foundation. The panel is then secured to the framing of the existing walls. Panels are supplied as completed insulated wall assemblies including claddings, with windows and doors installed. The old windows and doors in the existing building wall will be removed prior to the PEER panel being installed.

Pilot Projects

The Butterwick Group, a CHBA member company based in Edmonton, is leading a 59-unit pilot project using wood-framed PEER panels to achieve Net Zero Ready. Ottawa Community Housing will also undertake a pilot to retrofit four townhomes to Net Zero Energy using structural insulated panels (SIP) in 2020.

The Time is Right

To address climate change, future renovations will need to involve deep energy retrofits. CHBA members get a leading advantage on new technologies and ways of doing business. And the Association advocates for factors that will hopefully contribute to homeowners’ interest in renovating for energy efficiency, including home renovation tax credits. With the help of government research and development, methodologies like PEER should allow projects to be completed faster, allowing renovators to help more Canadians each year improve their home’s efficiency. It can also help renovators take on larger residential projects that they might otherwise not consider, since PEER is equally applicable to large homes and buildings. All in all, the future looks bright (and energy efficient) for Canadian renovators.

Mark Carver is a Project Leader with the Housing Team at CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada.
Gary Sharp is the Director of Renovator Services at CHBA.

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Affordable Energy Efficiency

Affordable Energy Efficiency

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Affordable Energy Efficiency

Images courtesy of Butterwick Construction & Carpentry Ltd.

Newly built Canadian homes have been steadily increasing in energy efficiency over the years – a code-built home today is 47% more efficient than one from 1985. Still, the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA) and its members are hard at work pursuing still greater energy efficiency innovations for voluntary adoption, while at the same time advocating that regulation wait until next levels don’t reduce affordability. But to truly address climate change in the housing sector, it is the existing housing stock that needs to be upgraded. Enter CHBA and its leading members again, as the pursuit of innovation for affordable deep energy retrofits working all the way towards net zero renovations kicks into gear.

Increasing Energy Efficiency in New and Older Homes

In new housing, industry leaders are paving the way to greater energy efficiency through voluntary programs such as the CHBA Net Zero Home Labelling Program. Founded by CHBA’s Net Zero Energy Housing Council, which is now five years old, CHBA’s leading members are providing discerning homeowners with net zero and net zero ready homes today, while working to innovate for greater affordability and increasing market penetration with each year.

But improving new homes alone won’t achieve the national goal, and it won’t help the millions of Canadians who live in older homes and want improved energy efficiency. Canada has 14 million residential residences, and approximately half of the current housing stock was built before 1985. Many of these older buildings are far behind new homes when it comes to energy efficiency. Even if all the new homes built from now until 2030 (say 200,000 per year, or 2 million total) were built to zero emissions, we still wouldn’t hit our environmental target – not even close.

Why Retrofits Are the Future

Renovating the existing housing stock is the only way for Canada to reach its greenhouse gases target in the housing industry. And with the half of our housing consuming twice as much energy as everything built since, that’s a lot of opportunity for renovators.

Canadians want their homes to be energy efficient. Maybe it’s a sense of social responsibility, uncertainty around utilities, simply a desire to reduce increasing energy bills, or a bit of each, but today’s homeowners are looking for improved energy performance. In fact, according to CHBA’s Home Buyer Preference Survey, powered by Avid Ratings Canada, nearly 90% of recent homebuyers indicated that having an energy efficient home was important to them. The survey gathers opinions of thousands of recent new homebuyers each year, and their preferences can easily be applied to renovations as well.

As Canadians seek higher levels of performance and comfort, the industry continues to innovate to strive to meet those desires in the most cost-effective fashion. And that innovation is needed to begin retrofitting older homes, which come with their own unique challenges.

Older renovated homes like this extremely efficient retrofit by Butterwick Construction & Carpentry Ltd. in Edmonton, Alta., are voluntarily paving the way to Net Zero renovations.

Setting the Stage

Drastically improving the energy efficiency of an older home requires an in-depth technical understanding of building science. And the best examples we have of that are by looking at Net Zero Homes.

A Net Zero Energy (NZE) home is one that produces the same amount of energy it uses, on an annualized basis. These homes are extremely well-built: they have very airtight, well insulated building envelopes with high-performance windows and doors. They also use efficient, right-sized mechanical systems in order to reach higher levels of energy performance. In addition to being incredibly efficient, NZE homes have built-in renewable energy generation (mostly solar panels). In some cases, they incorporate energy storage systems which allow homeowners to bank energy for future use. A Net Zero Energy Ready home (NZEr) is built to the same level of performance, but installation of the renewable energy component is left to the occupant at a future date – a popular option among NZE builders and homebuyers.

In both cases, the result is a home that delivers unrivaled levels of occupant comfort, minimum environmental impacts, and utility bills with much lower energy consumption.

CHBA is leading efforts to bring NZE and NZEr homes to market as affordably as possible. As the industry voluntarily learns new efficiencies with the technology and building practices involved, building costs are decreasing. CHBA’s aim is to share efficiencies and innovation among industry-leading CHBA members so that eventually the cost of owning a NZEr home is comparable to one built to conventional standards.

The first step was a demonstration program in 2015, backed by Owens Corning Canada and the federal government, that saw the construction of 26 such homes across Canada by five leading residential builders. Based on this success, CHBA launched its Net Zero Home Labelling Program to ensure that each participating home is qualified by a third party to meet the specified technical requirements. The program also includes training requirements for participating builder members and energy advisors.

And now, that scope involves renovations.

Bringing Net Zero Solutions to Renovations

The move to bring NZE homes and renovations to the marketplace is being spearheaded by the residential construction industry itself, through the work of CHBA’s Net Zero Energy Housing Council.

A broad collaboration involving homebuilders, manufacturers, utilities, design experts, government agencies, and service providers, the Council’s primary focus is on how to support innovation in the industry with the goal of creating a market advantage for CHBA builder and renovator members voluntarily pursuing Net Zero Energy.

Currently, they’re working to extend the Net Zero Program to renovations, so that older homes that meet the program requirements can receive the Net Zero/Ready label. To date, more than 100 new homes in Canada have received the label, which includes third-party verification. The program is growing exponentially each year as demand grows for not only energy efficiency at an affordable price point, but the comfort and health benefits that come with NZE homes.

Learn more about the CHBA’s Net Zero Home Labelling Program at CHBA.ca/nze and NetZeroHome.com.

Sonja Winkelmann, CHBA’s Director, Net Zero Energy Housing


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CHBA Connects - Book Smarts

Book smarts – An exclusive sneak peek inside the CHBA’s new renovators’ manual – Apr/May2019

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Book smarts – An exclusive sneak peek inside the CHBA’s new renovators’ manual – Apr/May2019

As you know from previous columns, CHBA has a Renovators’ Manual in the works. Similar to CHBA’s best-selling Builders’ Manual, the Renovators’ version applies building science to renovations. Existing buildings are going to be important as Canada takes steps to limit climate change. This month we offer a small sample of what readers can expect from the new book, when it is released to the public.

Canada has more than 14 million existing houses. Over half of these were built before 1980. That’s important because these older homes were not built to be anywhere near as energy efficient as houses being constructed today. In fact, a house built today is 47% better in terms of energy efficiency than a house built in 1985.

Building Codes are addressing the energy efficiency of new houses. Current plans are for new houses to reach Net Zero Ready levels of energy efficiency by about 2030. Currently, builders are constructing approximately 200,000 housing units per year. This number has been quite consistent in recent years, although it is expected to slowly drop in the face of an aging population. Some simple math shows us that over the next 10 years, building at the anticipated rate, we can expect between 1.8 and 2 million more houses to be created. While these will be far more efficient than the houses we have now, there is no scenario for reducing the total amount of energy used by homes without addressing the existing housing stock.

The Renovators’ Manual will help with those renovations as renovators are asked to significantly improve the energy efficiency of existing houses. Looking a little deeper, this means that renovators will be asked to “apply” the building science they know to existing houses. This is not as easy as it might seem, since applying building science to the materials and systems that are already installed is quite different than starting with a clean slate when designing a new build. The process also involves combining new materials with the existing structure they are renovating.

Net Zero Ready houses are typically being constructed with R-65 ceilings, R-40 walls, triple-glazed windows, R-35 basement walls, and R-10 under the basement floor slab. They will also have air tightness of less than 1.0 air change per hour at 50 Pa of depressurization (ACH50). Even the most ambitious renovation of an older home would find these performance characteristics difficult to match, but renovators will want to know how close they can come, and how to avoid technical problems in doing so.

The challenge will come from the correct “application” of the building science. The houses that need the most work are expected to be the older ones. Many of these have little to no insulation. Even if these houses have been renovated previously, it is unlikely that the renovation will have added a significant amount of insulation. It will be useful to review the most likely starting condition of the house, for example;

  • 2×4 wood frame or masonry structural exterior walls
  • Little or no insulation in the walls
  • Little insulation in the ceiling
  • Little or no insulation on basement walls or under the basement floor
  • Poor airtightness characteristics (i.e. drafty)
  • Large humidity swings – low in winter and high in summer
  • Large furnace and/or air conditioner
  • No heat recovery ventilator – bathroom fans or windows for ventilation
  • May have a wood-burning fireplace
  • Poor drainage around foundation
  • Double-glazed windows

Other important considerations are the climate where the house is located, and the characteristics of the occupants of the house. A maritime climate has different characteristics than a prairie climate. A house with two seniors has different operational characteristics than a house with young children. As renovators, we can’t change the occupants, so we need to provide a home that suits their specific lifestyle and needs.

In the case of the house described above, lets look at what has been happening over the years since it was built.

  • The house has had little insulation so large amounts of energy has been flowing though the building envelope.
  • The house has numerous holes and air leaks that result in large heat losses, however the benefit of such high air exchange rate is better, if uncontrolled, indoor air quality. If there is a wood-burning fireplace, these typically allow large amounts of house air to exhaust through the open chimney. Even with “tight-fitting doors or flue dampers, the fireplace chimney is generally a huge energy (and air) loss source for the building.
  • Relative humidity in the house is expected to have been low in the winter, due to the high air exchange rate and high in the summer, for the same reason. This would lead to the house being hard to heat and cool, but also uncomfortable.
  • Windows, in particular in the “wet” rooms such as the bathrooms and the kitchen, were likely subject to condensation on the glass in the winter and the shoulder seasons.

When looking at such a typical existing house the first step is to examine the decisions that need to be made. In this case, let’s pick a traditional war-time, Victory Home which are common in many cities across the country.

Blown opportunity: most older homes have little to no insulation in the wall cavities, an obvious first step to improving energy efficiency.
Blown opportunity: most older homes have little to no insulation in the wall cavities, an obvious first step to improving energy efficiency.

General

The renovator will need to decide on the building science features which need to be addressed.

  • If the drainage is poor, this needs to be fixed, regardless of what the house is made of.
  • The basement floor is uninsulated. This will not be a comfortable floor without insulation. It is unlikely that removing the basement floor, adding insulation, and then re-installing a concrete floor makes sense unless the existing floor is in poor condition. Therefore, insulation can only be added to the top of the floor. This will be limited by the basement ceiling height.
  • New triple-glazed windows will be needed to improve the envelope.
  • The wall thickness will need to be increased to accommodate the increased insulation.
  • The key building science features needed:
    • Weather barrier
    • Rain screen
    • Thermal barrier
    • Air barrier
    • Vapour barrier
Historic victory: across the country, many WWII-era victory homes, originally built as temporary housing for industrial workers, are still standing as permanent but inefficient homes.
Historic victory: across the country, many WWII-era victory homes, originally built as temporary housing for industrial workers, are still standing as permanent but inefficient homes.

Victory Home

This house will be wood-frame. It is unlikely that the exterior of the house is historically significant, and therefore the renovator has options. The insulation can be added to the interior or the exterior of the building. While working on the inside of the home is easier, the Victory Home is a modest size and the owners may be reluctant to reduce their floor area. To accommodate this, the decision may be made to add thickness to the exterior. The method of increasing the thickness of the wall studs will be the most problematic decision. This can be done in a number of ways and an architect should be consulted for a suitable solution. Typically, the frame of the existing house is structurally sufficient enough to allow the extensions to be “hung” from the existing walls. If that decision is made, then several items fall into place.

The weather barrier is the exterior cladding. Unless an air space is incorporated into the cladding by the nature of the cladding itself, it needs to be installed on strapping to provide an air space.

The rain screen is the air space between the cladding and the house wrap or the insulation installed over top of the studs.

The thermal barrier could be selected to do “double-duty” by selecting foam insulation which also has air barrier properties.

The selection of the vapour barrier is required. Keep in mind that vapour diffusion is a relatively weak process for moving moisture and is dependent on the surface area covered. If 90% of the surface is covered, then 90% of the vapour diffusion is prevented. Moving air is the primary transport mechanism for moving moisture. If the air barrier feature is being handled by another material, the vapour barrier can be a vapour retardant paint (if the interior drywall was not removed, the vapour barrier may already be in place with the existing, multiple coats of paint). If the walls were opened, there is an opportunity to install a sheet-type vapour barrier. This can be polyethylene, or it can be one of the materials where the vapour permeance changes with humidity. This will allow any moisture which happens to get into the wall due to poor flashing details or poor window installation to dry.

The ceiling can be sealed by removing the existing ceiling insulation and applying two or three inches of spray foam insulation to provide the air barrier properties. The desired amount of insulation can then be blown in on top of this to provide the thermal barrier function.

The basement walls and rim joist space decisions will generally be based on the type of foundation present. The most likely options are concrete block or poured concrete. Poured concrete is considered an air barrier, while concrete block is not. If poured concrete, spray foam insulation may be the best solution for connecting the air barrier in the walls, the rim joists, and the basement wall. If concrete block was used, an alternative such as airtight drywall, a vapour permeable, air barrier sheet material or spray foam insulation against the concrete block wall. Typically, drainage is poor in these older houses so a mechanism to allow these walls to dry to the inside is preferred. A provision must be made to ensure that the air barrier is connected to the concrete floor as well. How to do this detail will depend on the method chosen to provide the air barrier for the basement wall.

Now, with the house better insulated, with better windows and more airtight, the air conditioning and heating systems will be over-sized. If left as-is, oversizing will lead to short cycling and this may lead to inadequate distribution of heat and cooling in the house. Also be aware that with the improved air tightness, mechanical ventilation will be required to eliminate cooking odours and to control humidity levels. Therefore, the renovation should include an upgrade to the heating and cooling equipment as well as adding a heat recovery ventilator.

Hopefully this example highlights some of the challenges that renovators might expect and demonstrates the role the new CHBA Renovators’ Manual will play in helping renovators with the decisions they will be making to improve the energy efficiency of housing across the country.

Gary Sharp, CHBA

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Lowrise Feature: Lucchetta Homes

Lucchetta Homes is Niagara’s award-winning builder

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Lucchetta Homes is Niagara’s award-winning builder

Davis Heights is one of Niagara’s finest new addresses by Lucchetta Homes, featuring a limited selection of bungalow/bungaloft custom towns, backing onto a lush ravine and the Niagara escarpment.

The LUXE Collection is custom-curated by the renowned interior design firm – Raphael Gomes Interiors. The Versailles model home is now open for viewing, and features a vertical glass wine-cellar embedded in the staircase and filled with local wines.

Occupancies are scheduled for late 2019, and into 2020. Interiors include double masters with ensuites, a panelled library, 15-foot vaulted ceilings in the living room, gourmet kitchens with two-tone cabinets, and an oversized island. The lower-level features a spacious guest suite, a games room, a wet-bar, a great room with a home theatre, and a personal gym. Every detail has been considered on these homes that range from 1,530 to 2,600 square feet, priced from the $744,900s.

Join Lucchetta Homes on May 25th for their Sip and Savour charity event. Lucchetta will be matching all donations and presenting the proceeds to Wellspring Niagara. At the event, guests will be treated to an oyster bar, hor d’oeuvres, local wine, craft beer, and live entertainment, while viewing the new releases. Davis Heights is currently 60 per cent sold.

Riverside

As part of Riverside‘s grand opening special at Hunter’s Pointe, new home buyers will receive $10,000 in upgrades with the purchase of a luxury, single-detached bungalow. Walkout, waterfront lots, single detached lots, and award-winning bungalow towns, are priced from $499,900, with occupancy scheduled for April 2020. Move-in-ready homes are available with 30-, 60- or 90-day closings.

Now open, and designed by Wendi Pelfrey, is the award-winning, Net Zero Ready Lancaster model. Addressing the needs of those new home purchasers who are downsizing, everything is meticulously designed and accessible. The Lancaster was recently nominated as the Best Home in Ontario and in Canada by both OHBA and CHBA. It also won Best Kitchen and Best Sales Team by the NHBA in 2019.

This resort-style, adult community includes world-class amenities and services. “Buying a home here is a fraction of the cost of comparable homes in the GTA,” says Kim Kopyl, director of sales and marketing for Lucchetta Homes. “And the quality of life is far superior.”

Celebrated builder

Ugo Lucchetta started the company more than 60 years ago. Sons, Robert and Ed, carry on the traditions started by their father. Their hard work has paid off with ongoing appreciation and word-of mouth praise from their loyal customers.

In 2018, alone, Lucchetta Homes won, or were nominated for, more than 30 awards by all levels of builders’ associations – local, provincial and national. Most recently, they won Community of The Year by CHBA and EQ’s Energy Star Builder of The Year. In addition, they received the Excellence in Green, and Community of The Year, by the NHBA (2019).

Lucchetta Homes was the only builder in Ontario this year to have been selected as a finalist by the CHBA National Awards in five categories, including Best Detached Home (one-storey bungalow); Best Attached Home (under 1,500 sq. ft.); Best Print Ad (Riverside); Best Attached Home (1,500+ sq. ft.); and Best Brochure (Davis Heights). “Just to be nominated amongst the very best in the industry in Canada is a tremendous achievement, and a testament to our entire team,” says Kopyl.

Robert and Ed Lucchetta commented on the fact that it’s very prestigious to be considered for national awards as a boutique builder. They build every home as if they would live in it themselves, and constantly reinforce their mantra – legendary luxury. They not only build homes, but sustainable foundations to live your best life.

lucchettahomes.com


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EDITOR'S CHOICE: Georgian International

EDITOR’S CHOICE: Georgian International

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EDITOR’S CHOICE: Georgian International

Live Remarkably by choosing a home in a pastoral setting with vacation-like amenities close at hand

Developed by the multifaceted company Georgian International and recognized as the Best New Home Community in Canada (2016) by the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA), as well as its award-winning sales centre, Braestone Estates continues to gain recognition for the down-home, up-country lifestyle community that it promotes.

Located in Oro-Medonte, within the beautiful Horseshoe Valley, the 229 homes at Braestone are situated on 566 acres of aesthetically appealing landscape. Braestone is well-known for its distinctive architecture, which is a modern interpretation of the country-style dwellings of the Oro-Medonte region.

Born of the land, Braestone’s Remarkables feature timeless designs that are a natural reflection of the magnificent landscape surrounding the community. Remarkable experiences that all homeowners can enjoy include horseback riding and Nordic skiing, as well as picking seasonal fruit, tapping maple sugar trees, playing baseball and hiking on the private trail system.

WINDFALL

In addition to the award-winning community of Braestone, Georgian International is building a lifestyle community at the base of Blue Mountain. The Windfall at Blue Mountain encompasses 148 acres, one-third of which will be dedicated to parks, ponds and trails, as well as wildlife and nature preservation areas.

Winner of Simcoe County Home Builders’ Association’s Project of the Year (2017), the community of Windfall includes a wonderful selection of mountain-chalet-inspired detached and semi-detached designs.

MOUNTAIN HOUSE

The newest project by Georgian International is Mountain House at Windfall. Released in January, this project has been well-received. Construction has begun on the 230-unit Mountain House lowrise development, which is positioned in an idyllic setting.

Two-, three-, and four-storey buildings feature chalet-style terrace suites, complemented by a community building and a bike repair station, in addition to a sauna, relaxation room, as well as hot and cold pools.

Collingwood, Blue Mountain and Wasaga Beach are all easily accessible from Windfall and Mountain House. There’s no shortage of things to do. Nearby activities include boating and fishing on Georgian Bay, as well as skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, water parks, golfing and hiking.

CREATING DIVERSITY

In addition to their residential real estate projects, Georgian International acquired the former Orillia Golf & Country Club in 2017. Since then, the course has been renamed Braestone Club and is a stone’s throw away from the development that shares its name. The company has begun to revitalize the course, and has plans to include a multipurpose club house and events venue.

Real estate prices continue to rise in Toronto, and Hamilton is experiencing major growth, making home ownership out of reach for many. New home purchasers are now looking to make their full-time home in a more pastoral setting with vacation-like amenities close at hand. Georgian Bay and Oro-Medonte are wonderful lifestyle alternatives. Georgian International’s tagline is “Live Remarkably.” At any one of its three new developments, you can do just that.

GEORGIAN INTERNATIONAL

Go online for more about Braestone, Windfall and Mountain House.

GeorgianInternational.com


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Georgian International

Georgian International

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Georgian International

Creating Remarkable Communities

Choose a full-time home in a pastoral setting, with vacation-like amenities close at hand. Georgian Bay and Oro-Medonte are wonderful lifestyle alternatives.

Developed by the multi-faceted company, Georgian International, and recognized as the Best New Home Community in Canada (2016) by the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, as well as a CHBA award-winning sales centre, Braestone Estates continues to gain recognition for the down-home, up-country lifestyle community that they promote.

Located in Oro-Medonte, within the beautiful Horseshoe Valley, the 229 homes at Braestone are situated on 566 acres of aesthetically appealing landscape. Braestone is well-known for its distinctive architecture, which is a modern interpretation of the country style dwellings of the Oro-Medonte region. Born of the land, Braestone’s Remarkables’ collection features timeless designs that are a natural reflection of the magnificent landscape surrounding the community. Remarkable experiences that all homeowners can enjoy, include horseback riding and Nordic skiing, as well as picking seasonal fruit, tapping maple sugar trees, playing baseball and hiking on the private trail system.

WINDFALL AT BLUE MOUNTAIN

In addition to the award-winning community of Braestone, Georgian International is building a lifestyle community at the base of Blue Mountain. The Windfall at Blue Mountain encompasses 148 acres, one-third of which will be dedicated to parks, ponds and trails, as well as wildlife and nature preservation areas. Winner of Simcoe County Home Builders’ Association’s Project of the Year (2017), the community of Windfall includes a wonderful selection of mountain-chalet-inspired detached, and semi-detached, designs.

MOUNTAIN HOUSE

The newest project by Georgian International is Mountain House at Windfall. Released in January 2018, this project has been well-received. Construction has begun on the 230-unit Mountain House low rise development, which is positioned in an idyllic setting. Two-, three-, and four-storey buildings feature chalet-style terrace suites, complemented by a community building and a bike repair station, in addition to a sauna and relaxation room, as well as hot and cold pools.

ACTIVE PURSUITS

Collingwood, Blue Mountain and Wasaga Beach are all easily accessible from Windfall and Mountain House. There’s no shortage of things to do. Nearby activities include boating and fishing on Georgian Bay, as well as skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, water parks, golfing and hiking.

CREATING DIVERSITY

In addition to their residential real estate projects, Georgian International acquired the former Orillia Golf & Country Club in 2017. Since then, the course has been renamed Braestone Club, and is a stone’s throw away from the development that shares its name. The company has begun to revitalize the course, and has plans to include a multipurpose club house and events venue.

Georgian International has been carving their own path for more than 30 years. In addition to real estate development, company divisions include Georgian Chevrolet Buick GMC and Air Georgian, which operates as an Air Canada Express partner, carrying more than one million passengers on an annual basis.

Real estate prices continue to rise in Toronto, and Hamilton is experiencing major growth, making home ownership out of reach for many. New home purchasers are now looking at making their full-time home in a more pastoral setting, with vacation-like amenities close at hand. Georgian Bay and Oro-Medonte are wonderful lifestyle alternatives. Georgian International’s tagline is; live remarkably. At any one of their three new developments, you can do just that.

CONTACT INFORMATION

georgianinternational.com


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