Tag Archives: affordability

Ontario web

Ontario government commits to housing action plan

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Ontario government commits to housing action plan

Ontario web
Steve Clark, minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing

The Ontario government says it is committed to a housing plan that makes more good quality places to live available for “the hardworking people of the province.”

“In communities all across Ontario, people are struggling to find housing they can afford,” says Steve Clark, minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing. “We’re taking action to help create more housing faster, give people more choice and bring down housing costs.”

Ontario is knocking down barriers to people getting housing they can afford that meets their needs, through:

 

  • Legislation that would make new rental units exempt from rent control, effective Nov. 15, 2018, while preserving rent increase limits for existing tenants
  • Ending the previous government’s expensive and ineffective Development Charges Rebate Program
  • Seeking public input on ways the government can remove barriers to building the right kind of housing in the right places. This input will inform a broader housing supply action plan. The consultation includes a downloadable toolkit so community groups can host local roundtables and share their thoughts with the province.

 

The demand for housing in Ontario has risen rapidly in recent years, driven by strong population growth and low interest rates. However, the supply of housing has not kept pace, leading to higher prices and rents.

Building more housing will also help make Ontario more attractive to businesses and investors, restoring the province to its rightful place as the economic engine of Canada.

“High housing costs are a barrier to job creators, large and small, because employees need affordable places to live,” says Todd Smith, minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade. “Making housing more affordable will encourage people to start and grow businesses, right here at home.”

BILD reaction

“The Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) of the GTA is very supportive of the development of a Housing Supply Action Plan for Ontario,” says David Wilkes, president and CEO. “Shortfall in supply is a key factor undermining housing affordability, increasing rents and creating barriers to home ownership. We applaud the Ford government’s commitment  to address key issues affecting the housing supply and ultimately the affordability of housing in the GTA.”

TREB approves

The Toronto Real Estate Board, for its part, applauds the Province’s announcement.

“The Toronto Real Estate Board applauds the provincial government for taking action to ensure that our city, region and province have an adequate supply and appropriate mix of housing,” TREB said in a release.

Nowhere are housing supply and mix issues more of a priority than in the GTA, where TREB’s 53,000 members operate, the association says. “TREB realtors work with home buyers and sellers every day and they see the challenges caused by inadequate supply and mix of housing.

“We look forward to participating in the provincial government’s consultation process on this issue and helping our region and province to remain one of the best places to live in the world.”

RELATED READING

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5 steps to solving the housing affordability issue in Ontario

 

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Source: Century 21 Canada

Canada’s most and least expensive places to buy – and guess where Toronto is

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Canada’s most and least expensive places to buy – and guess where Toronto is

Source: Century 21 Canada
Source: Century 21 Canada

In yet another potential dagger in the heart of prospective first-time homebuyers, a new study from Century 21 Canada underlines the growing affordability issue in Toronto.

The price-per-square-foot (ppsf) of downtown Toronto rose more than 10 per cent in the last year and continues to top Ontario home prices. Meanwhile, prices rose and fell turbulently in GTA suburbs and other communities in the province.

Source: Century 21 Canada
Source: Century 21 Canada

The ppsf of a condo in downtown Toronto rose to $903 from $819 last year, making Toronto Canada’s second most expensive city for homes, after Metro Vancouver. Meanwhile, the ppsf for a detached house in Markham and Richmond Hill each fell 24 per cent to $379 and $445 respectively, while condos in Peterborough rose to $255. Home prices in Ottawa and Guelph were more stable, rising 4.65 per cent to $225 and 4.5 per cent to $397 ppsf, respectively.

UNPREDICTABLE YEAR

“It has been an unpredictable year in Ontario housing prices, with the price per square foot rising and falling from community-to-community and even suburb-to-suburb,” says Brian Rushton, executive vice-president of Century 21 Canada. “Much like in Canada’s other major centres prices fall rapidly once you are outside the downtown core of Toronto, and homes in those communities remain relatively affordable. Even with an increase of almost five per cent, Ottawa remains one of the least expensive places to live in Ontario.”

Toronto’s rising prices are underscored in another survey earlier this year by Century 21 Canada, asking Canadians to rate their current living situation. The survey found only 39 per cent of Toronto residents are living in close to their ideal situation (eight out of 10 on a 10-point scale), while 13 per cent reported their situation is far from ideal. At 26 per cent, a large number of Toronto residents say an apartment or condo is their ideal living situation.

RELATED READING

New condos in Toronto hit record high in prices

Canadian housing market to moderate in 2019 but growth to continue in Ontario and Toronto

Home prices and affordability still a concern – CMHC Mortgage Consumer Survey

5 steps to solving the housing affordability issue in Ontario

 

 

 

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GTA 2019

7 factors that will affect GTA housing in 2019 – and 5 reasons to consider buying NOW

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7 factors that will affect GTA housing in 2019 – and 5 reasons to consider buying NOW

GTA 2019

By Wayne Karl

GTA homebuyers, we have some good news and some bad news.

First, the good news: You live in one of the most desirable areas and housing markets in Canada – maybe even the world.

The bad news? That affordability challenge we’re all facing.

“The affordability issue is not going away,” PricewaterhouseCoopers says plainly, in its Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2019 report.

Why? See point number one.

“Potential homebuyers will need to alter their expectations and possibly delay entry into homeownership,” Dana Senagama, manager, market analysis for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC), told Homes Publishing.

Not exactly the most hopeful outlook for those – especially first-timers – looking to buy a home in and around the GTA.

But it’s not all bad. Let’s look at what’s going on in the market, and what would-be buyers can do to help their cause.

1 Return to price growth

Following the introduction of the Ontario Fair Housing Plan in April 2017, recent interest rate hikes and other changes, sales and prices in the GTA have seen some moderation.

But the slowing will be short-lived, Senagama says. Key economic fundamentals such as population and employment growth will continue to drive housing market demand, but the supply of new homes is not being addressed. The result? A return to price growth.

“CMHC is working on data gaps like supply with many industry stakeholders and partners,” she says. “Currently, we are participating in a working group with the province of Ontario to find solutions and best practices.”

PwC says the region is feeling the effects of demographic shifts. Millennials have begun to compete with Baby Boomers for real estate, and over the next decade, almost 700,000 first-time buyers will target the GTA or Hamilton markets, according to a May 2018 report from the Ontario Real Estate Association.

2 Risk of overvaluation

Senagama cautions, however, that the Toronto market is still showing signs of overvaluation.

“This happens when house price growth is surpassing the population and income growth. So, despite some of the moderation you’re seeing, we’re still calling for a high degree of vulnerability in Toronto in the foreseeable future.”

3 Inelastic supply

The GTA housing market is characterized by inelastic supply. “Supply is slow to respond to any change in price, and we’re seeing that time and time again,” she says.

Recent research from CMHC and Altus Group, in fact, shows that of the lowrise new home projects that were started in 2016 and 2017, it took 15 years for those developments to go from the initial land purchase to product hitting the market.

Supply response
Source: CMHC

 

“We have a problem, in terms of supply.”

With very limited new home supply hitting the market, once buyers get used to temporary shocks to the system brought on by policy issues and rising interest rates, they return to buying homes, which in turn drives up prices.

4 Condo demand

With lowrise home prices enjoying spectacular growth in recent years, there was a compositional shift in demand toward less expensive product – namely condos – particular among first-time buyers.

But now, with price growth even in this category – with average condo prices rising 8.4 per cent year-over-year to $552,269 in the third quarter this year – and pre-construction units in the $700,000 range…

“These are not price points for first-time buyers,” Senagama says, “so we’re still looking at very high prices across the GTA.”

5 Mortgage rates

The Bank of Canada has already raised its influential overnight rate target three times since July 2017, to 1.5 per cent from 0.75 per cent. Experts expect at least one more increase this year, possibly as early as the next rate announcement on Oct. 24.

A more moderate pace of rate increases could impact the market, but not significantly since the majority of mortgage holders are on fixed-rate mortgages, CMHC research shows.

6 Rental market

Any discussion about affordability needs to include the rental market, Senagama says. “Much like the ownership segment, supply is a huge constraint in the Toronto rental market.”

Rental

With the average vacancy rate in the GTA 1.1 per cent, and 0.7 per cent for condo rentals, rental rate increases are picking up steam. “Because we have a supply problem. And because we don’t have enough supply of the purpose-built rental units, the gap has been filled in by the condo market.”

About 33 per cent of all condos in Toronto are being rented out by investors, according to CMHC. This results in renters paying a much higher premium to rent a condo versus a purpose-built apartment – on average 50 per cent more, for a two-bedroom unit.

“We talk about affordability, and this raises so many other concerns, especially in a market that is supply-strapped,” Senagama says.

7 Catch 22

investors are buying into the condo market to rent out their units, taking advantage of the tight rental market. But first-time buyers – who typically aren’t equity-rich or wealthy – have to compete for available condo product, which again drives up prices.

 

 

5 REASONS TO BUY A HOME NOW (OR AS SOON AS YOU CAN)

1 Affordability

More supply of new homes is a big part of the solution. But despite ongoing lobbying from the housing industry, and apparent increasing awareness of new elected municipal leaders, this problem won’t be solved overnight. It will take time. Lots of it. In the meantime, as PricewaterhouseCoopers says: The affordability issue is not going away. It might even get worse before it gets better.

2 Market moderation waning

With little relief on the supply side expected, price growth will continue to be strong, even if somewhat muted compared to the double-digit increases seen over the last few years. In short, the longer buyers wait, the more it could cost you.

3 Interest rates

Experts expect at least one more increase this year, possibly as early as the next rate announcement on Oct. 24. To protect yourself against a more moderate pace of rate increases, consider a fixed-rate mortgage product.

4 Pent-up demand

Buyers believe prices are going to increase, but not to the same degree we’ve seen in recent years. This will lead to pent-up demand, which when released over the next year, will contribute to increasing buying activity and rising prices. So, if you’re able to buy before then, you could beat the rush.

5 Rental market

If you’re a Millennial planning to move out of home and into the rental market, consider this: Toronto is the most expensive Canadian rental market, with average rates for one-bedroom units at slightly more than $1,900 per month (up 2.8 per cent from August to September); $2,374 for two-bedrooms (up 7.1 per cent). Try saving up for a down payment at those rates; maybe staying at home a little longer isn’t so bad after all.

Wayne Karl is Senior Digital Editor at Homes Publishing. wayne.karl@homesmag.com 

RELATED READING

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5 steps to solving the housing affordability issue in Ontario

5 affordable neighbourhoods for detached homes in 416 and 905

Vast majority of GTA Millennials fear buying a home is out of reach, poll says

GTA housing market correction coming to an end, ReMax says

 

 

 

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Mortgage

Home prices and affordability still a concern – CMHC Mortgage Consumer Survey

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Home prices and affordability still a concern – CMHC Mortgage Consumer Survey

Mortgage

Rising home prices and affordability continue to weigh on prospective homebuyers, according to Canada Mortgage Housing Corp., in its 2018 Mortgage Consumer Survey.

Indeed, for first-time buyers, price and affordability are the most important factors they consider when buying a home – more than type of neighbourhood, proximity to work and overall condition of the home.

While decreasing steadily for four consecutive surveys, more than one-third (37 per cent) of homebuyers continue to feel concern or uncertainty when buying a home. “Concerns related to affordability top the list with more than 50 per cent of concerned buyers worrying about paying too much for their home while nearly one-third worry about rising interest rates and mortgage qualification,” the survey says.

Other survey highlights include:

  • Eighty-five per cent of first-time buyers spent the most they could afford on their home purchase.  However, a majority (76 per cent) are confident that they will be able to meet their future mortgage payment obligations.
  • Sixty per cent of first-time buyers and 69 per cent of repeat buyers indicated that, if they were to run into some financial trouble, they would have sufficient assets (such as investments and other property) to supplement their needs.
  • About 50 per cent of homebuyers agreed they would feel comfortable using more technology to arrange their next mortgage transaction. However, the majority agree it is important to meet face-to-face with their mortgage professional when negotiating and finalizing their mortgage.
  • Slightly more than half (52 per cent) of homebuyers were aware of the latest mortgage qualification rules. About one in five first-time buyers indicated the rules impacted their purchase decision with most opting to decrease non-essential expenses, purchase a less expensive home or use savings to increase their down payment.
  • Consumers continue to show confidence in their homebuying and mortgage decisions, with 80 per cent believing that homeownership remains a good long-term financial investment and 66 per cent believing the value of their home will increase in the next 12 months.
  • More than one in five (22 per cent) first-time buyers were newcomers to Canada and almost 50 per cent were millennials (aged of 25 to 34), down from 60 per cent in 2017.

RELATED READING

5 steps to solving the housing affordability issue in Ontario

Build For Growth: Housing Affordability

Higher Rates and New Rules Cooling the Condo Market

 

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Detached homes

5 affordable neighbourhoods for detached homes in 416 and 905

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5 affordable neighbourhoods for detached homes in 416 and 905

Detached homes

by Wayne Karl

Looking for a detached home in the GTA and not sure where to look? Despite what recent reports would have you believe,  there are still some affordable neighbourhoods for single-family homes in the 416 and 905 areas.

Affordable being a relative word, of course, as compared to average prices. As of Sept. 30, 2018, the average price of a detached home in the GTA is $1.01 million – $1.34 million in the 416, and $905,722 in the 905.

Indeed, there’s been no shortage of stories recently about the challenges of the housing market – namely supply, pricing and affordability – on both the resale and new homes sides of the market.

The most recent, in fact, coming this morning.

“While higher borrowing costs and tougher mortgage qualification rules have kept sales levels off the record pace set in 2016, many households remain positive about home ownership as a quality long-term investment,” Toronto Real Estate Board President Garry Bhaura said Oct. 3 in releasing TREB’s Market Watch Report for September. “As the GTA population continues to grow, the real challenge in the housing market will be supply rather than demand. The Toronto Real Estate Board is especially concerned with issues affecting housing supply as we move towards municipal elections across the region.”

For the purposes of this story, let’s focus on resale homes. (We’ll prepare a follow-up focusing on new detached homes in a subsequent report in the coming days.

First, let’s look at some of the hottest areas of the GTA in terms of price growth.

Top five GTA neighbourhoods for price appreciation

Detached homes in 2018
NEIGHBOURHOOD Q1 Q2 % Change
Palmerston-Little Italy,
Trinity-Bellwoods $1.60M $1.87M 17
Brock $498,966 $573,951 15
The Beaches $1.32M $1.50M 13
Edenbridge, Humber Valley, Islington $1.43M $1.57M 10
Georgina $538,817 $590,255 10
Source: ReMax Integra Ontario-Atlantic Region, TREB

 

Double-digit price growth in one quarter is fantastic if you currently own in any of these areas. But if you were hoping to buy there, your purchase price just got a lot more expensive in a matter of months.

Now, let’s take a look at some of the comparatively more affordable areas for detached homes in the GTA.

 

MOST AFFORDABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS IN THE 416

Detached homes, Q2 2018
NEIGHBOURHOOD Average Price
West Humber, Claireville, Rexdale-Kipling,
and Thistletown-Beaumond Heights $732,854
Bendale, Woburn and Morningside $742,670
Malvern, Rouge $752,292
Rockcliffe-Smythe, Keelesdale-Eglinton West, Weston $783,141
Downsview-Roding, Glenfield-Jane Heights, Black Creek $859,215
Source:  ReMax Integra Ontario-Atlantic Region, TREB

 

MOST AFFORDABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS IN THE 905

Detached homes, Q2 2018
NEIGHBOURHOOD Average Price
Essa $547,970
Oshawa $556,309
Brock $573,951
Clarington $585,562
Georgina $590,255
Source: ReMax Integra Ontario-Atlantic Region, TREB

 

As you can see, some of the still-affordable areas for detached homes in the GTA – such as Brock (Durham Region) and Georgina – are also performing well in terms of price growth.

Durham Region, Simcoe County and Dufferin County, in short, are hot.

In particular, Brock  and Essa (Simcoe County), Burlington, Halton Hills, Brampton, Orangeville and Scugog are all showing promise in detached home price growth, according to ReMax Integra, Ontario-Atlantic Canada Region.

“After an extended period of housing market inertia, the floodgates are breaking open,” says Christopher Alexander, executive vice-president and regional director, ReMax Integra. “Upward movement in detached housing values and the threat of additional interest rate hikes in the future are prompting homebuyers to get off the fence and into the market. Rising consumer confidence, job security and an economy firing on all cylinders should continue to support healthy home-buying activity in the GTA for the remainder of the year and into 2019.”

Next in this series, we’ll explore some of the new home developments and buying opportunities in some of these areas, as well as those for multi-family homes and condos.

Wayne Karl is Senior Digital Editor at Homes Publishing. wayne.karl@homesmag.com

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