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Engage in the art of growing

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Engage in the art of growing

More than ever, Canadians are making an attempt to shop at local farms and food markets. You only have to turn on the television and check out some of the celebrity chef programs to get a sense of the growing interest in food preparation. Growing fruits and veggies is at an all-time high.

Community gardens

These are gardens that are supported by a whole community of people. The harvest is shared with everyone who made a contribution of effort. Often a central kitchen is provided for the use by the same community. The growing interest in community gardens tells us that there is a large contingency of people who are looking for better quality produce from their own backyard.

Allotment gardens

These small areas of real estate are planted and nurtured by individuals, and are often supported by municipal government. They are great places to visit with like minded people, even if you do not have an allotment. Without a great deal of effort, you’ll witness a wide variety of garden designs and plant selections, as well as differing methods of growing and maintaining gardens.

Public gardeners have the added benefit of being able to ask questions, and observe practices and techniques that have proven to be helpful to other gardeners. Recipes are shared – not just for dinner, but also for soil preparation, and disease and insect treatment. Check out our website for growing the best tomatoes on the block.

Farmers’ markets

Real food guru, Michael Pollan, weighs in from his book, In Defense of Food. “It is hard to eat badly from the farmers’ market or from your garden. The number of farmers’ markets has more than doubled in the last 10 years, making it one of the fastest-growing segments of the food marketplace. Buying as much as you can from the farmers’ market, or directly from the farm when that’s an option, is a simple act with a host of profound consequences for your health, as well as for the health of the food chain you’ve now joined.”

Time well spent

The expenditure of time is often viewed in negative terms when it comes to food. In other cultures, it represents a good part of the day – growing, shopping and preparing for the main meal.

As we settle into hibernation during the winter season, it’s a perfect time to think about our food culture. Swap recipes, exchange growing tips, and break bread with a host of family and friends on these long, dark evenings.

Now is also the time to start planning your vegetable garden, and to order seeds. This is the beginning of a year-long process of sowing, growing, nurturing and harvesting. More than 30 per cent of Canadians will engage in this satisfying past time. There’s nothing like seeing, and tasting, the fruits of your labour.

Mark Cullen is an expert gardener, author and broadcaster. The New Canadian Garden is published by Dundurn Press. Follow him on Facebook and on Twitter @MarkCullen4. MarkCullen.com

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