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Composting compost, the magic elixir for your garden

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Composting compost, the magic elixir for your garden

We waste up to 50 per cent of our compostable materials. According to Susan Antler, executive director of the Composting Council of Canada, we’re not very good at composting the organics from inside, and outside, of where we live. “Whether it’s the backyard composter at home, or through green bin composting programs, those banana peels (no stickers please), apple cores, fallen leaves and garden trimmings can be recycled,” says Antler.

Even though approximately 61 per cent of Canadians have access to some form of composting, many of us do not take full advantage of it.

We can do better

This year, Compost Awareness Week takes place from May 3rd to the 9th, 2020. It’s the perfect time to reignite your commitment to save the planet. Convert the raw, organic material from your kitchen and garden into a magic elixir. All plant life relies on it for sustenance.

It’s reported that 45 per cent of households compost their kitchen waste, and 68 per cent of Canadians recycle their garden waste. One of the biggest challenges is to come up with a broad-based program for condos and apartments.

Don’t slip

When you put a banana peel, or other organic waste, in the garbage, it produces gases, which is composed primarily of methane – a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. The decomposition of methane is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide in terms of its global warming potential.

Brown stuff/green stuff

When composting in your yard, the green organic material that you add to your compost pile is nitrogen rich. The brown stuff, including fallen leaves and shredded newspaper, is carbon rich. Ideally, you should include one part green stuff in your compost for every five to 10 parts of brown stuff. This will also help to prevent your compost from smelling bad.

Oxygen is your friend. Keep turning it. Similar to starting a fire by blowing on it, you will ignite the decomposition process in your bin or compost pile when you turn it over with a garden fork every few weeks. It’s okay if you don’t turn it, but you will wait much longer for results.

Soil health

The success that you achieve in your garden is the direct result of proper soil enhancement and natural fertility. Soils are living ecosystems. Susan Antler reminds us that a handful of healthy soil contains more living organisms than there are people on the planet. When we add finished compost to our soil, we enhance the life-giving bacteria, fungi, protozoa and nematodes, as well as other more visible creatures such as earthworms. It’s the perfect time of year to add a two- to three centimetre layer of compost over your garden soil.

In short, composting and adding quality compost to your garden is the ultimate carbon trading scheme, as plants use photosynthesis to fix carbon in an organic form from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Healthy soil enhances soil aggregation and porosity, sequesters nitrogen and other nutrients, and reduces nutrient loss to pollution. It also out-competes disease and pest organisms, enhancing crop yields – and blooms.

Mark Cullen is a Member of the Order of Canada, and provides gardening advice to more than two million Canadians each week. Ben Cullen’s specialty is food gardening. markcullen.com; Facebook @MarkCullenGardening and Pinterest @MarkCullenGardening.

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