Tag Archives: JJs Arquitectura

Ice Breakers returns to Toronto's waterfront

Ice Breakers returns to Toronto’s waterfront

Latest News


Ice Breakers returns to Toronto’s waterfront

Ice Breakers will run from January 19 to February 25, 2018 with five art installations located on Queens Quay West.

A giant red bear reclining in the snow, a cozy cabin made from tree roots and a jingling wind chime constellation are just some of the installations that visitors to Toronto’s downtown Waterfront can experience this winter as the winners are announced for the second annual Ice Breakers event.

Ice Breakers, the temporary Waterfront art exhibition presented by the Waterfront BIA and produced by Winter Stations, asked artists and designers to look to the stars for inspiration for 2018, with the theme Constellation.

“After the huge success of last year’s Ice Breakers event, we decided to open the exhibition up as an international competition for 2018,” said Carol Jolly, executive director of the Waterfront BIA. “We were looking for installations that would bring colour, warmth and activity to the Waterfront, attracting visitors from across the city to experience this spectacular wintertime streetscape.”

On October 19, the Ice Breakers jury met to choose the final five art installations that will be built and featured along Queens Quay West. It was a full day of jury deliberations, where over 100 international submissions from around the world were reviewed. “We were bowled over by the high standard of entries this year, and the creative responses to the theme ‘constellation.’ We chose the winners based on their originality, feasibility and how interactive and engaging we thought they could be,” said Winter Stations co-founder Ted Merrick of Ferris + Associates.

Founded in 2015 by equal partners RAW, Ferris + Associates and Curio, Winter Stations is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to bringing temporary public art to the city. The marquee Winter Stations Design Competition is now in its fourth year. Running along Toronto’s east end beaches, Winter Stations asks designers from around the world to transform utilitarian lifeguard stations into creative, imaginative works of publicly accessible art for six weeks of the winter. In 2017, the organization extended its programming slate with Ice Breakers produced by Winter Stations, a new event conceived on behalf of The Waterfront BIA.

Introducing the 2018 Ice Breakers installations:

“Through the Eyes of the Bear” by Tanya Goertzen of People Places (Calgary)

Inspired by Ursa Major, or the Great Bear constellation, this installation uses renewable, recyclable and compostable materials to ask visitors to consider how humans interact with nature, or to see the world through the eyes of a bear.

“Black Bamboo” by Bennet Marburger and Ji Zhang of 2408 Studio (Hangzhou Shi, China)

Black Bamboo is an installation made from 90 painted bamboo poles freely arranged to form a framework in an abstract cubic shape. Like the constellations, the cube as a shape only comes into existence within our heads. Black Bamboo is accessible and invites visitors to walk or climb through it.

“Winter FanFare” by Thena Tak (Vancouver)

Winter FanFare is a series of rotating fan-sculptures that collectively form a circulation playscape for winter exploration. Winter FanFare deploys individual fan-sculptures to create clusters of pockets where the public can meander through or run in and around.

“Ensemble” by João Araújo Sousa and Joana Correia Silva, JJs Arquitectura (Porto, Portugal)

Ensemble merges architecture, music and astronomy to explore the dialogue between humans and the urban environment. The installation is inspired by wind chimes, which visitors can touch to create beautiful abstract compositions and ever-changing soundscapes.

“Root Cabin” by Liz Wreford and Peter Sampson, Public City Architecture (Winnipeg)

Like a constellation, Root Cabin is a mystery waiting to be discovered. Coloured cuts of wood can be seen through gaps in an alluring pile of weathered roots. When further explored by a visitor, the colours reveal a void that can be inhabited, and an iconic nostalgic form of Canadian dwelling emerges.



SHARE  

Featured Products