Tag Archives: Consumer Protection

h_apr2018_consumer_prot_1

Consumer Protection: Document All Deficiencies

Latest News


Consumer Protection: Document All Deficiencies

Most new homes will require some adjustments after move-in and Tarion is there to help

When you move into your new home, you hope that everything will be perfect. However, in reality, some aspects of your home may require fixes. In most cases, new homeowners and builders work well together to get the repairs done so that owners can fully enjoy their homes.

But what happens when you and your builder disagree on whether the items that need to be repaired are covered under the warranty?

That’s when Tarion can step in. We can help you settle disagreements about warranty coverage when you and your builder are unable to do so. There are a few steps you need to take to ensure we can help you.

First, you must submit a warranty claim to Tarion within the proper timeframe using one of our forms. The forms include the 30-day form, the yearend form, the second-year form and the major structural defect form.

One of the easiest ways to submit a form is through MyHome, Tarion’s online portal (there’s also an app) that owners of newly built homes can use to manage their warranty.

Once you register with MyHome, you can find the proper form for your warranty claim, fill it out and submit it easily from your computer or mobile device.

After you submit the claim, your builder has a specific number of days, called a repair period, to resolve all the items on your form that are covered by the warranty.

If your builder doesn’t fix all your warranty items by the end of the repair period, you can request conciliation. This is a process in which Tarion decides whether the items on your warranty claim form are covered under the warranty.

Conciliation may include a visit to your home, or what we call a desk assessment – a review of all the documentation related to the claim. You should provide all evidence – documents, photographs, videotapes, etc. – that you want Tarion to consider when assessing your claim.

A Tarion Warranty Services Representative, acting as a neutral and impartial decision maker, will review your documentation, determine if the items on your claim form are covered under the warranty and issue a report that explains Tarion’s decision. If Tarion agrees that your claim items are covered, your builder is given a final 30 days to resolve them. If that doesn’t happen, we’ll resolve your claim directly with you.

Some homeowners are worried that working with Tarion on their unresolved claims will affect their relationship with their builder. However, you need to protect your investment and your warranty rights. So, if you can’t agree with your builder about repairs to your new home, know that we’re here to help.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corporation. His column appears 10 times a year in HOMES Magazine. For more information about how Tarion helps new homebuyers, visit Tarion.com or find them on Facebook at Facebook.com/TarionWarrantyCorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_apr2018_consumer_prot_fi

Consumer Protection: A Cancelled Project Doesn’t Leave You Out of Pocket

Latest News


Consumer Protection: A Cancelled Project Doesn’t Leave You Out of Pocket

If you check out Toronto’s skyline, you’ll see cranes – lots and lots of cranes. They’re a sign of the times in today’s condo construction boom. While the frenzied market we saw for detached homes in 2017 has calmed down a bit, the demand for condos has continued to grow as people see them as the only affordable option.

While there seems to be no shortage of willing condo buyers, however, there is a shortage of preconstruction condos available for sale. Unfortunately, this is due in part to development projects taking longer than expected to be built, or some being cancelled altogether.

There may be many different reasons why some developments don’t ever get constructed – for example, the builders might lack sufficient capital or fail to obtain the necessary zoning or permits. Whatever the cause, a cancelled project can leave purchasers without a home to look forward to. The good news is that it shouldn’t leave them out of pocket.

Under the Condominium Act, if a condo project is cancelled, purchasers are entitled to receive their entire deposit back, including any payments made for extras and upgrades. This is because the builders are required to put these monies in trust or provide alternative acceptable security. If a project is terminated and for some reason the deposits and other amounts are not repaid by the vendor then condo buyers are eligible for protection from Tarion up to $20,000, plus certain accrued interest.

If you’re buying a pre-construction condo, there is always a risk that the project could be delayed or cancelled. There have even been cases where purchase agreements are terminated and then the condos are constructed at a later date.

That’s why it’s important for potential buyers to know that under the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act, a builder must attach an Addendum to every condo purchase agreement that requires them to disclose the status of the zoning approval and construction. It also limits what kind of early termination conditions that they can impose in the purchase agreement and obligates them to use reasonable efforts to meet these conditions before they can cancel the project.

There are consumer protections in place to ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to complete a condo project, but it is important to understand your rights as a purchaser if it does not. If your purchase agreement is terminated through no fault of your own, you should get your money back within 10 days. If you don’t, Tarion is here to help.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders. Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_mar18_consumer_prot_1

Consumer Protection: Fraud Prevention Month Keeps Buyers Aware of Any Problems

Latest News


Consumer Protection: Fraud Prevention Month Keeps Buyers Aware of Any Problems

Not only does March herald the beginning of spring, it’s also Fraud Prevention Month. And as new home construction ramps up with the warmer weather, we want buyers to be aware that illegal builders may be at work as well.

To help protect homebuyers, fines for illegal building were recently increased under the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act.

The increases are significant: As of the beginning of the year, individuals found violating the law can face fines of as much as $50,000 – up from $25,000 – as well as imprisonment of up to two years less a day, twice the previous jail time. Corporations building new homes will face the heaviest penalties, with maximum fines of $250,000, up from the previous $100,000 fine. Their directors and officers can also be fined up to $50,000.

The increases in fines and jail time are intended to act as a deterrent for illegal builders who may compromise the safety and functionality of your new home, not to mention tarnish the reputation of the entire industry.

So what constitutes an “illegal” builder? The definition applies to any builder who enters into an agreement of purchase or sale or a construction contract for a new home and is not registered with Tarion. It’s also illegal to start building a home or condominium without first enrolling the project with Tarion.

Choosing a legal builder is important and I can give you a number of good reasons why.

As part of their registration with Tarion, legal builders have to pass a written test on the Ontario Building Code and prove that they have the technical competence and financial means to produce a well-built home. Legal builders and vendors also respect the legal requirement to enroll the new home or condo in the warranty plan.

Purchasers of new homes are entitled to deposit protection and delayed closing compensation, a one-year warranty on work and materials and Ontario Building Code violations, a two-year warranty on defects e.g., water penetration, and seven years for major structural defects.

If the home is built illegally, there are at least two concerns. The homeowner is less likely to know their warranty rights. Also, homeowners could end up with a building that may not even be safe to live in or be financially responsible for problems that occur later on.

To be on the safe side you should always check the Ontario Builder Directory on Tarion.com for information on licensed builders.

In line with Fraud Prevention Month, if you believe a builder is not licensed please call the Tarion anonymous tip-line at 1.800.786-6497. All information remains confidential.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders.

Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_nov2017_cons_prot_fi

Consumer Protection: How Do You Know What’s Covered By Your Warranty?

Latest News


Consumer Protection: How Do You Know What’s Covered By Your Warranty?

The first year of homeownership is a critical time to report any problems

When you are buying a new home, you want everything to be perfect. Unfortunately, things can — and do — go wrong. Whether it’s something relatively minor, like unfinished trim around your bathroom door, or a potentially major issue like a crack in your foundation, your new home warranty is there to protect you.

Once you sign your purchase agreement, you should receive a New Homeowner Information Package from your builder. It will outline the package of warranties that protects new homeowners for up to seven years and $300,000 in coverage.

But how do you know if your faulty light switch or unfinished driveway is covered by warranty? It’s not always easy to tell, but our award winning customer service team is here to help answer your questions

As of June, our team had already fielded 23,960 phone calls, 10,734 emails and 1,064 online chats. Approximately two-thirds of all these inquiries came from homeowners, many of whom needed advice on how their warranty work.

When I talk with our call centre reps, they tell me that one of the most common questions they receive from homeowners is, “How do I know if items are covered by the warranty?”

Your new home warranty consists of one-year, two-year and seven-year warranties that cover various elements of your home’s construction. If you don’t know whether an issue will be covered under your warranty, you can consult the Construction Performance Guidelines, which are available on Tarion.com or via MyHome, Tarion’s online portal for managing your warranty. You can also call or email us to ask.

The first year of homeownership is a critical time to report any problems you have with your home. You can submit two forms in the first year after you take possession – one within the first 30 days and one within the last 30 days.

While Tarion’s acceptance of your form does not automatically mean that everything on the form will be covered by your warranty, it does provide a written record of your issues. This is why we recommend that you include everything on your form.

As a new homeowner, you obviously want to maintain a good relationship with your builder. If you’re worried about submitting your form, you should remember that you’re not being a tattletale – you’re protecting your rights.

Responsible builders will address warranty issues in a timely manner but if your builder doesn’t, the forms you submit help us help you.

The Tarion team is here to ensure your new home is safe and protected.

Our reward is comments like these from one happy homeowner: “Thank you so much for handling this so quickly. We appreciate the excellent customer service you have always given us!”

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corporation. His column appears five times a year in HOMES Magazine. For more information about how Tarion helps new homebuyers, visit Tarion.com or find them on Facebook at Facebook.com/TarionWarrantyCorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_nov17_cons_prot_fi

Consumer Protection: Building Communities One Home at a Time

Latest News


Consumer Protection: Building Communities One Home at a Time

Tarion is committed to protecting new homes for Ontarians — but more often than not what we consider our ‘tools of the trade’ would be computers and phones, not drills or saws. Last month however, a team of Tarion employees showed what they could do with hammers and nails as they helped build homes for two deserving families in London, Ontario.

The construction project, sponsored by Habitat for Humanity, was the 10th build that Tarion staff have helped support over the past decade. This year, we were helping to build homes for the Kassa and Cooper families.

The Kassa family — a mother and two adult children, one of whom is in a wheelchair — currently live in an apartment that was never built to accommodate someone with disabilities. The Kassa’s new home will be equipped with accessibility features that will enable the daughter with cerebral palsy to move more freely and allow her mother to more easily care for her.

The Coopers are a family of seven that fled a civil war in Liberia and came to Canada in 2005. They have been squeezed into a tiny, cramped apartment ever since. Their new home, while still modest in size, will provide them with a lot more space to grow and thrive together.

Most of our volunteer team had never worked in construction nor had they participated in a Habitat build before. I was able to catch up with a few of the employees who took part and ask them about their experience. Despite being tired and a little achy, all of them said they would do it again.

One employee told me he now has a better appreciation for the hard work and craftsmanship that goes into building a new home.

Another said she felt honoured to play a part in these families’ homeownership stories.

Tarion’s relationship with Habitat for Humanity began over 20 years ago when the organization first registered as a new home builder in Ontario. Since that time, we have waived enrolment fees for over 1,000 of their homes, which amounts to more than $520,000 in savings! Enrolment fees are what builders pay to register every new house or condominium unit in Ontario’s new home warranty program.

Volunteering for Habitat for Humanity is a rewarding and educational experience for staff and a crucial part of Tarion’s culture as a caring organization that is committed to building better communities across the province.

The Coopers and Kassas will soon be able to move into their new homes and we are very proud to have helped change the lives of these two families.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders. Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


cl_nov17_real_insight_fi

Real Insight: TREB Working With Province to Ensure Greater Efficiency

Latest News


Real Insight: TREB Working With Province to Ensure Greater Efficiency

TREB is demonstrating its commitment to consumer protection and efficiency for real estate transactions in meetings with the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services. TREB has met multiple times with Ministry officials to provide input on their ongoing consultations regarding potential changes to the Real Estate and Business Brokers Act, 2002.

We are happy to work with the Province to ensure that the rules governing the real estate industry are modernized and adjusted to ensure consumer protection and an efficient marketplace for real estate professionals and the public. We also believe that consumers deserve to be treated with fairness, honesty, and integrity when purchasing a home, often the biggest financial decision in most people’s lives.

Phase One of the current provincial review is focusing on issues associated with multiple representation situations, consumer understanding of real estate transaction agreements, and penalties for unethical behaviour.

TREB supports, in principle, the proposal to move towards a mandatory designated representation model. This approach is consistent with numerous other Canadian jurisdictions, and we believe that it will allow for the efficient operation of the marketplace, while ensuring consumer protection.

Under Mandatory Designated Representation (MDR) that the government is proposing, where a circumstance arises that a buyer and seller are represented by the same real estate brokerage, the brokerage would be required to designate different representatives from that brokerage to represent each client. A salesperson/broker within a brokerage would be prohibited from representing both the buyer and the seller, or more than one buyer, in the same trade with limited exceptions such as a private arrangement between family members or there are a small number of registrants in areas serving a small market or community.

However, TREB is advocating that there should also be provisions (transactional representation) to allow for consumer choice in how and by whom they are represented when working with their brokerage and licensed representative. Transactional Representation will be an option when a representative is representing both a buyer and seller in the same potential transaction with their consent. Three options will be presented to the consumer: unrepresented; represented by another representative for that transaction; or Transactional Representation.

Transactional representation eliminates the ability for a representative to represent both clients by restricting the services they can offer to both a buyer and seller. If they consent, the representative becomes an impartial facilitator.

The vast majority of TREB Members are ethical and comply with the Real Estate and Business Brokers Act. There should be a review for consistency in enforcement and disclosure of fines and penalties. Any actions in this area should be evidence-based. With this in mind, we look forward to continuing to work with the Province on all aspects of this and other important issues such as raising educational standards and requirements.

Tim Syrianos is president of the Toronto Real Estate Board, a professional association that represents 48,000 professional realtor members in the Greater Toronto Area. You can contact him At TREBpres@trebnet.com. For updates on the real estate market, visit TREBhome.com. If commercial property is what interests you, contact a TREB realtor by visiting TREBcommercial.com.

SHARE  

Featured Products


Consumer Protection

Consumer Protection: More Proection Coming To Ontario Condominium Buyers

Latest News


Consumer Protection: More Proection Coming To Ontario Condominium Buyers

I am pleased to announce that more protection is coming to Ontario’s condominium buyers.

Tarion has been working with the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services to extend warranty coverage to certain condominium conversions that are proposed to take effect in January, 2018. This addition to the warranty is an important part of updating the overall protections for new home buyers as the housing market continues to change and evolve.

Converting older buildings into new condos has been occurring not only in Ontario and across the country, but around the world. As availability of land becomes progressively scarce, existing buildings – such as factories and churches – have become attractive development opportunities. Developers keep many of the beautiful and historic architectural features of these older structures intact, while renovating the interior and bringing them up to date with today’s building code. Buyers get to enjoy living in a repurposed space with a modern twist.

Today, condominium conversions are not included under Ontario’s new home warranty. But that is about to change. Tarion is currently consulting with the public as we work on implementing a warranty that protects consumers should their builder not fix certain defects in their newly converted condominiums. While some aspects of the warranty may differ from the current new condo warranty in Ontario, it will still be a robust and comprehensive warranty with consumer protection at its core.

This new warranty protection would apply only to condos that are being converted from non-residential buildings. This means that former factories, churches, or anything previously used for commercial or non-residential purposes may be eligible for coverage. Rental apartment buildings that are converted into condos would not be covered. This means that the stock of rental apartments will not be reduced, which is particularly important for urban centres experiencing a shortage in rental units.

The proposed warranty is proposed to be comparable to the existing new condo warranty. Buyers would benefit from deposit protection and delay compensation and any new elements would have the same first-year warranty that exists today on new condos. Preexisting elements would also have to comply with the Ontario Building Code and be fit for habitation. Both new and pre-existing elements would be covered in the two-year warranties for water penetration and defects in electrical, plumbing and heating delivery and distribution systems, and the seven-year warranty for major structural defects.

There is one exception to this warranty: it would not cover first year workmanship and materials for pre-existing elements since older elements cannot be expected to have the same look, feel and performance as new elements.

Another important way we are strengthening consumer protection is the proposed requirement for builders of condominium conversions to be registered with Tarion before they start a conversion project. This means builders would be evaluated by Tarion to make sure they are competent and have the financial resources needed to undertake these projects.

Earlier this year, Tarion consulted with the public on the development of these new regulations. We are now accepting submissions in response to the draft regulations and new rules. Visit Tarion.com to find out how you can have your say – the deadline to submit your thoughts is September 11, 2017.

And if you plan to purchase a converted condominium in 2018, be sure to check if it is covered under the warranty. Take some time to understand what is covered, when you need to fill out your warranty forms, and how the warranty process works at Tarion.com.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders.

Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_may2017_cons_prot_fi

Consumer Protection: Tarion

Latest News


Consumer Protection: Tarion

It is business as usual at the new home warranty provider.

In late March, the Ontario government announced it intends to make substantial changes to the regulation of the building industry and Tarion. You may have read about these proposed changes, as the announcement generated quite a bit of media attention.

As a result, shortly after the announcement, Tarion staff began to receive a lot of enquiries from both new homeowners and builders, asking how these changes affect them. They wanted to know where they can get help on warranty questions and issues.

I would like to assure new homeowners and builders that, for the time being, it is business as usual at Tarion.

The government’s plans for changing how the industry is regulated are wide-ranging and complex. They will significantly affect how Tarion operates in the future. However, I expect it will likely take some time before these changes come into effect.

In the meantime, our staff remains ready, willing and able to provide information, resources and answers to homeowners and builders alike on the province’s new home warranty.

I think it is worth reminding consumers that Tarion is more than just a warranty provider. For more than 40 years, we have proudly served to protect new homebuyers and owners by anticipating and responding to changing markets and consumer needs.

Some of our improvements and initiatives have raised the bar for builders, which ultimately benefits consumers. For example, we introduced construction performance guidelines to ensure a consistency in construction quality and we recently brought in new education requirements for new builders to improve qualification standards for builders entering the industry.

Our warranty program has also seen significant enhancements over the years, again in response to the changing needs of consumers and the industry. For example, warranty coverage limits have increased to reflect the rising costs of homes and repairs.

The seven-year warranty covers illegally built homes – something no other warranty in Canada offers. And, we were the first and only province to provide coverage for radon gas remediation and for delayed closings.

Along the way, our staff has won international awards for customer service. This is not surprising to us. In annual surveys we sent to new homeowners and builders, Tarion consistently scores above an 80 per cent approval rating for its customer service.

Given that we help administer the warranty to more than 350,000 homes and regulate more than 5,000 builders, I believe that rating is a strong indication of our dedication to customer service and consumer protection.

One hot issue in today’s housing marketing is deposit protection coverage for buyers of new homes and condominiums. This is especially important now, as house prices continue to escalate.

That’s why, as a consumer protection organization, we support changes to deposit coverage limits to better protect consumers against builders who, for one reason or another, are unable to complete building homes. We are therefore pleased that the government indicated it wants to work with Tarion to review deposit protection coverage limits in the coming weeks and months.

To sum up, I believe the changes the government is proposing could take considerable time to put in place. So, for the time being, our staff remain committed to delivering their award winning customer service, and new home owners and builders should take comfort that it is business as usual.

Howard Bogach is president and CEO of the Tarion Warranty Corporation. His column appears five times a year in HOMES Magazine. For more information about how Tarion helps new home buyers, visit tarion.com or find them on Facebook at facebook.com/tarionwarrantycorp

SHARE  

Featured Products


Consumer Protection

Consumer Protection – Illegal Building – Why It Matters!

Latest News


Consumer Protection – Illegal Building – Why It Matters!

Since March is Fraud Prevention Month, you would have heard a lot about how consumers can protect themselves from being victims of fraud.

There are all kinds of fraudulent schemes, but one that may not get as much attention as it should is the illegal building of new homes.

Certainly, it affects consumers and registered builders alike. So, it’s no surprise that when I am out at events speaking with Ontario consumers or new home builders, the subject regularly comes up as a topic of conversation.

What is illegal building? And why is it important that we work to stop it?

First of all, for consumers, it can mean that their new home is being built by someone who does not actually have the financial or technical expertise to build new homes. It can also mean that the home is poorly built and does not meet Ontario’s Building Code specifications. It may even be a hazard to live in.

The buyer or property owner may also encounter unexpected liability issues during the construction of an illegally built home, especially if an on-site accident happens during construction. And the buyer may not be aware of their rights or responsibilities under the statutory new home warranty once the home is completed.

Illegal building also contributes to the underground economy. So, for the majority of good registered builders, the practice can create unfair competition. Since many illegally built homes are eligible for warranty protection under the legislation, registered builders effectively subsidize the warranty on these homes.

Illegal building can also have a negative effect on the reputation of the industry overall.

One challenge we face in combatting illegal building is that not every new home buyer knows that all builders, by law, must be registered with Tarion and that they have an obligation to provide the new home warranty. Consumers who aren’t aware of this can be deceived by stories of the warranty being optional or too expensive.

An illegal builder, meanwhile, may want to avoid the accountability and warranty obligations that come with building a new home. They may also be trying to avoid municipal building code inspections or workplace health and safety legislation.

They are gambling that no one will report them to Tarion. Not the homebuyer, neighbours, municipal building departments, subtrades, suppliers or other registered builders. That is why we work closely with everyone in our industry to raise public awareness about this issue and to create confidence in our new home marketplace.

Tarion’s ability to combat illegal building depends in part on purchasers and others in the community reporting suspicious activity. Here are some red flags that may suggest your builder is operating illegally:

  •  They say they built the home for themselves, but then decided to sell it;
  • They say you don’t need a Tarion warranty because they offer their own;
  • They give you an inflated cost for the Tarion warranty — the maximum cost is $1,500; and,
  • They give you a short contract to sign; or worse, no contract at all.

In short, illegal building affects everyone. It can create liability risks for the purchaser, impact the building industry, including its reputation, and prevent the homeowner from understanding their warranty rights and responsibilities.

That’s why illegal building matters.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders.

Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products


h_mar17_con_prot_fi

Consumer Protection : Getting The Most Out of Ontario’s New Home Warranty Program

Latest News


Consumer Protection : Getting The Most Out of Ontario’s New Home Warranty Program

Value for your money is top of mind for consumers these days, a notion that was reinforced in a New York Times article I read recently about extended warranties.

The article talked about the practice of encouraging consumers to purchase an extended warranty, above and beyond the manufacturer’s warranty, when they buy a product.

It got me thinking about warranties in the context of new homes, specifically the Ontario new home warranty. In Ontario, new home builders by law are required to provide a set of warranties that last up to seven years on every new home they build. The builder must enroll the home in the warranty program before construction even begins.

h_mar17_con_prot_1

The enrollment fee — ranging from $385 to a maximum of $1,500, depending on the value of the home — is paid by builders. And yes, this cost is often passed on to the purchaser, like almost every other cost a builder incurs, including overhead or administration fees.

Yet, for this one-time investment, new homebuyers are provided with a wide range of protections.

The core of the Ontario new home warranty program provides coverage for defects in workmanship and materials and violations of the Ontario Building Code for up to seven years to a maximum of $300,000. However, there are a number of additional protections, not available in other jurisdictions, that provide extra value to Ontario’s new homeowners.

For example, even before you move into your new home, the warranty program protects your deposit up to $40,000 for freehold homes and $20,000 for condominium units. In addition, there is compensation for delayed closing or occupancy. If your builder agreed to deliver your home by a certain date (whether the original date or a date that was properly extended) and fails to deliver on time, your builder may be required to compensate you for that delay. The maximum compensation is $7,500.

The warranty also protects you against unauthorized substitutions. If your choice of baseboard trim was contained in your Agreement of Purchase and Sale and accepted by the builder, then your builder must provide that trim. If it’s not available, your builder must ask you in writing to make another selection.

Coverage for radon gas is another warranty feature not found elsewhere in Canada. If excessive levels of radon gas are found in your home anytime during the seven-year period of your warranty, you may be covered for remediation of the gas.

Tarion also addresses risks associated with illegal building. Illegal builders typically avoid enrolling a new home in the warranty program. This means the homeowner is likely unaware of their rights and responsibilities under the warranty. The good news is that if the builder fails to enrol a home, there may still be a warranty for the home.

All of these protections add up to provide Ontario’s new homebuyers with comprehensive warranty coverage that is also affordable.

HOWARD BOGACH is president and CEO of Tarion Warranty Corp., a private corporation established to protect the rights of new homebuyers and to regulate new home builders.

Tarion.com

SHARE  

Featured Products